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ROTOGRAVURE SUPPLEMENT 





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bringing less heat to the lips. 

It is a smoother and milder ciga- 
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has taken out all the harshness 



and bitterness in the tobacco. 

It is a more fragrant and pleas- 
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the pick of the choicest Turkish 
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in aromatic smoking quality. 



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What Is 
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One whoexecutesand delivers 
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other words, a person whose 
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You can obtain confidential in- 
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Bureau, John Hancock Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., 107 Clar- 
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Tol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2926 



UNLIMITED CUTS 
TO HIGH STUDENTS 



\ v \s Plan in Effect this 
Honor Groups Announced. 



Term. 



FRATERNITIES GET 

MANY FRESHMEN 



Results of Strenuous 
Season Announced. 



Rushing 



I he list of honor students for the fall 
term hat recently baaa posted on the 
loin's Board. The junior class placed 
the largest number in the First Mourns 
Group wit' 1 ■ total of four of its members 
with scholastic averages between 90 and 
[00. The seniors hold the lead in the 
,ad Group and the sophomores head 
the third. All those students in the fire! 
two groups w '" ne avowed great freedom 
in the matter of class attendance, with a 
[e« restrictions. Full information in re- 
ord to the privilege of unlimited cuts 
will appear in the next issue of the 
Collegian. 

The lists of the three Honor Groups 
l follows: 
First Honors Group— 90 to 100 

Harold E. Clark '28 of Montague, 
Maxwell H. Goldberg '28 of Stoneham, 
Hartwell E. Roper '28 of Closter, N. J., 
Mary Ingraham '28 of Millis, Ruth H. 
Parish '29 of Great Barrington, Eliza- 
beth A. Steinbugler '29 of Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Second Honors Group— 85 to 90 

Max Bovarnick '27, Caltori O. Cart- 
wright '27, Wendall B. Cook '27, Richard 
C. Foley *27, Edwin J. Haertl '27, Ralph 
\Y. Haskins '27, Lewis J. Maxwell '27, 
1 r mcis R. Mullen '27, Josiah W. Parsons. 
Jr. -'7, Herman E. Pickens '27, Otto 11. 
Richter '27, Donald (*. Savage '27, 
Frederick W. Swan '27, Almeda It. 
Walker '27, Jennie If. W'iggin '- 7 . 
ISlanche D. Avery '28, Ellsworth Barnard 

38, Lara M- RttchtlriVr '-'.s, Hans Baum- 
n, ■[• 2S, (iordon E. Bearse '-*. 
Dorothy M. Cooke '28, Seth J. Ewer '28, 
Harriet P. Hall 38, Wellington W. 
Kennedy '28, Karl G. Laubenstcin *3B, 
Walter R. Smith '2S, Ernest L Spencer 

28, George \V. Dattoa '38, William (.. 

KM '-">, Roman A. Kreienbaum '29, 
Kliz.th.th P. Love '29, Kenneth F. Ml 
Kittnck '29, Boleslaw Nitkiewicz _"', 
William R. Phinney '29, Roliert S. Siidl 

Dickran Yartanian '2'.». 

Third Honors Group— 80 to 85 
Robert C Ames '27, Frank J. Bodea 
J7, Robert W. Hurrell '27, Edward A. 
CoaneJl '27, James E. Greenaway '27, 
Raymond G. Griffin ''21, George F. 
Hatch. Jr. '27, John J. Mahoney '27, 
Everett J. Pyh '27, James B. Reed '27, 
Lawrence D. Rhoade* '27, Ezekicl Riv- 
n.iy 27, Neil C. Robinson '27, Herbert 
1. Verity '21, Leo L. Allen '28, Alexander 
I Hudson '28, Margaret A. Little _'s, 
(oeephtM Panzica '28, Oliver S. Plan- 
(Continued on Pane 2) 



Taking stock alter the close- of the 
rushing Mason ihowi more than a hun- 
dred pinrlp buttons being worn on the 
Campus, with a It u bidl still tO be heard 

from. The number pledged It slightly 
higher .than last year, though there an 

main freshmen who have Stayed non- 

frateraity for th<- time being at least. 

The following is .i list of the pledges t<> 
the various fraternities: 



1929 
Morrison, L \\ . 

1930 
Dean, Lucien 



T. v. 

Horwett, Leoaard 
Niins, Russell 
Packsarian, John 
Stacy, Paul 

Phi Sigma Kappa 



1886 

Babson, Osman 

Bartch, Nelson 

Bond, Richard H. 

Burbank, O. F. 

Crane 

Drew, William B. 



Hall, Addison S. 
Howard, Lucius 
Potter, Stewart H. 
Pray, Francis C. 
Sleeper, Ralph 
Taft, Jesse A. 
Wadleigh, Cecil H. 



Goodnow, Robt. G. Yeatman, Alwyn F. 

Kappa Sigma 

1930 Smith, Raymond 

Hammond, Clarence Smith, VVinthrop 
McChesney, H. L. Tiffany, Don C. 
Phinney, Paul T. White, Harold 
Robertson, Harold 

Kappa Gamma Phi 

Eldridge, Francis Smith, R egin a ld 
Renaud, Hector (Incomplete) 

(Continued on l*-«ti»- 2) 



GOOD PROSPECTS FOR 
CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 



Five Veterans of 1925 Team Report 
to Coach Derby. 



Loss to College in 

Miss Goessmans Death 



Daughter of Noted Chemist had 
been Member of Faculty Since 1914. 




On August 19, Miss Helena T. Goess- 
nian passed away in the Dickinson Hospi- 
tal after a very short illness. Miss 
nan has been associated with the 
MAC. faculty as an instructor in 
h since 1914 and was Assistant in 
Kiu'ish from 1910-14. Her father was 
head of the Chemistry Department for 
its, and the new Goessman Labora- 
tory is named in honor of him. 

Miss CoessmAn studied in Boston, New 

York, England, Paris, and Munich. She 

I tin degre e of Ph.M. from Ohio 

ratty in 1895. Her interests were 

many and varied and as a result she was 

led a place in the 1886-27 Who's 

She was a member of the Amherst 

rical Society, chairman of the ad- 

board of the Woman's Auxiliary of 

itliolic Summer School at Cliff 

New York, since 1888, Miss 

an was the organizer in 1900 and 

st president of the Elmhurst 

Alumn u Y--ociation. She was an honor- 

raber of the Delta Phi Gamma 

Miss Goessman was a member 

Pen and Brush Club of New York 

*he has published several books and 

it plays. 

The tleath of Miss Goessman is a great 

the college and many pupils and 

vends will mourn the passing of a life 

a| tno-t entirely devoted to the teaching of 

other-. 



■<■< i - are good with five 
veterans back on deck for the cross 
country team. Coach Derby has some 
fine material to pick from in the under- 
classmen who were out for track last 
year. The veterans from la>t \..tr Ml 
Capt. Crooks, Preston, Biron, Swann, 
and Nottebaert. Among the most prom- 
ising candidates are Fo wl ami Hemee* 

berrv. Forest won one race last year 
when Crooks was out with a sprained 
ankle and coming along good. Henne- 
berry is exacted to make a ha.d try for 
the team. 

1 ushman track started Monday with 
a large numl>er present. Coach Derby 
hesitates to make any predictions, it 
being still early in the season. 

The schedule: 
Oct. 9— Tufts at MAC, 

16 — Williams at Willi amstown 
22— Wesleyan at M.A.C. 
29 — Amherst at Amherst 
Nov. ti — Boston Univ. at Boston 
15— N. E. I. at Boston 



Eldred Memorial Award 

Under New System 



Scholarship and Service in Athletics 
to Determine Winner. 



The method of awarding the F rederic! 
Cornelius Eldred Award has been changed. 

The amount of the prize has been in- 
creased from fifty and thirty dollars to 
one hundred dollars. The original method 
of choosing the winner was to require 
each candidate to present an essay con- 
taining constructive suggestions for the 
physical im p ro vem ent of the students, to 
the trustees of the fund. 

The new award of one hundred dollars 
is to be made to the member of the senior 

class who has represented the college in 

intercollegiate athletic contests for a 
period of at least two years. This student 
must also have attained the highest 
average standing in S cho la r ship during 
his course. 

Frederick Cornelius Eldred was a 
famous oarsman and a prominent pioneer 
in athletics at MAC. He trained, 
coached, and stroked crews in four inter- 
collegiate races, two of which were 
victorious. Mr. Eldred was a member oi 
the class of 1873. 



INFIRMARY HOURS 



Out -Patients 

Week days) n a. m. to 1 p. m. 

."> p. m. t«. 7 p. m. 
Sundays: 8 a. m. to 10 a m. 

il*.:*o p. in. to ;{.:«) p. m. 

Emergency cases will be received .it 

any time; otherwise' students are cv 

|>ected to come during office hours only. 



Ames to Head 
R.CX T.C. Unit 



Other Appointments of Cadet Officers 
Announced by Military Department. 



Robert ('. Ames, of the class of 19-7, 
has been awarded the position of Major 
in the Cavalry Unit, R.O.T.C, of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. The 
unit which consisted of a regiment last 
year, has been reduced to one squadron. 
This reduction in sire does not mean that 
there are fewer men in the unit, hut that 
each troop in the squadron will have the 
full number of squads. There will be five 
troops, one of which will consist of the 
band. 

The list of officers for the ensuing year 
is as follows: 

Major 
Robert C. Ames Squadron Commander 

Captains 
Lewis J. Maxwell Troop A 

Raphael A. Biron Troop B 

( larence H. Parsons Troop C 

Lewis II. Black Troop D 

Janus B. Reed Service Troop 

Robert W. McAllister Adjutant 

First Lieutenants 
Earl F. Williams Troop A 

Frederic J. Fleming Troop B 

Lawrence D. Rhoades Troop C 

Herman E. Picken- Troop D 

Harry ('. Nottebaert Service Troop 

Second Lieutenants 
Horace II. Worssam Troop B 

Charles E. Russell Troop A 

Frederick R. Bray Troop (' 

Charles I". Clagg Troop I) 

Continued on I'uti*- 2) 



Aged Alumnus 

Of College Dies 



George A. 
Hartford. 



Parker Passes Away in 



George A. Parker, prominent nieinlxr 
of the dam of 1S7C of M.A.C, died ill 
Hartford on Septcmlier 18, after Ixinv; 
■trickea with heart disease while waiting 
in a restaurant. Mr. Parker was Su|>cr- 
mtendent of Parks in Hartford until last 
January when In- resigned the position 
to devote his time to landscape archi- 
tecture. 

Mr. Parker was born in Fitzwilliam, 
N. IL, April 28, lH.>f, and was educated 
in the public schools of that town. After 
graduation from M.A.C, he took up 
landscape gardening and the develop- 
ment of parks. 

His most inqiortant work was done 
while superintendent of parks in Hart- 
ford, an office which he held for nearly 
twenty years. During this time Colt 
Park was developed, and a number of 
smaller parks were acquired by the city. 
Under his supervision, Hartford parks 
came to be known as some of the most 
extensive and beautiful in the country. 
Mr. Parker was also president of the 
juvenile commission and had served M ■ 
member of the state park commission and 
the city planning commission. 



ROPE PULL POSTPONED 



The freshman-sophomore sixty-man 
rope pull, which was to have taken 
place last Saturday, has been po-t 
poned until there is more water in the 
pond. It is now scheduled for Satur- 
day, Sept. -'.->, but unless a good deal 
of rain falls before that time, further 
postponement will probably be Bt 
sary. The other contests between the 
two lower classes which formerly fea- 
tured the first week of college, namely, 
"Razoo Night" and the "Nightshirt 
Parade ', will be conducted on the 
same plan as last year, and will take 
place sometime later in the term. 







Entering Class One f*f 

Largest i History 

Increase in numbers proves tuition no deterrent to prospective 
students. Many co-eds in class of 1930 



FOOTBALL. TEAM 

COMING FAST 



Many Alumni Aid in Coaching Re- 
cruits. Injuries to Candidates Hold 
Back Squad. 



Fifteen Aggie graduates nave evidence 
of their affection for their Alma Mater 
this fall by returning for several days to 
help "Kid" Core instruct candidates for 
the l'.Uti eleven, which has only three 
letter men available. 

Among the voluntary coaches were 
Wilbur Marshnian ''2'A, in charge of the 
ends and backheld, and Linus (iavin '2(1, 
line coach, who will remain for the entire 
season, as will "Pop" Clark '87, who will 
once more direct the activities of the 
second team. The large number of tem- 
porary coaches gave the squad of thirty 
men who reported the first week an ex- 
cellent optiort unity to receive profitable 
instruction. W. I. Goodwin 'IS, "Red" 
Ball '21, C. H. Roser "2'2, "Ken" Salman 
'24, Sterling Myrick '24, < .eorge Shum- 
way '25, Charlie McGeoch '2, r ), and Cou- 
hig, Fessendcn, Gustafson, Jones, Sulli- 
van, anil Tulenko of last year's team, all 
devoted considerable time to the squad. 

William (.. Amstein '27 of I >ecrheld 
has been named ai ting captain to fill the 
place lelt vacant by Joseph Hilyard '27, 
who was declared ineligible tor the season. 
"Joe-" expects to return to college in the 
spring, and will probably play with the 
1927 outtit. Flection of a permanent 
captain for the season will not be held 
until several contests have taken place 
and berths on the eleven have been more 
definitely assured. 

Although the squad has .sustained the 
loss ot several valuable men by ineligi- 
bility rulings and by injuries, the spirit 
■howfl by the players promises a team 
which will be a credit to M.A.C Black 
whose knee was severely injured, Cox, 
( oukos, Johnson, and Mahonev have been 
i Continued on Pug ■ t) 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 
WELL ATTENDED 



M.A.C. Christian Association Extends 
Hearty Welcome to New Students. 



The welcome to the incoming freshmen, 
sponsored by the Christian Associations 
proved to be a very successful affair. It 
was estimated that there were between 
:M) and 400 present, including students, 
faculty, ministers, and friends. Robert 
C Ames '27, master of ceremonies, and 
Elmer E. Barber, secretary of the men's 
association, told of the work done by tin 
Association here in college. Miss Almeda 
Walker '27, spoke about the many possi- 
bilities for good work in the Y.VV.CA. 
Miss Edna Skinner and Miss Margaret 
Hamlin addressed trn»girls especially ami 
gave them a welcome and a few words of 
advice. 

President Edward M. Lewis proved DO 
be a popular man on the program when 
he told several of his p ers ona l e.\|x rien. BS. 
He emphasized particularly that the new 
students should welcome the privilege of 
being able to attend their own chun lies 
while here at M.A.C Neil Robinson '21 
drew much applause by his lather dry- 
way of presenting the opport unit ies in 

academic activities open to the students, 

Lawrence Jones, captain of the 1!*2<> foot- 
ball team urged the new men to partici- 
pate in HON form of athletic s. I le asserted 
that no one need neglect his studies if he 
li an athlete. Sidney B. Haskell, director 
of the Experiment Station a d dres s ed (In- 
gathering on behalf of the faculty and the 
alumni. Mr. Haskell was |xculiarly fitd-d 
to advise the new students, for not only 
has he graduated from this institution 
himself, but also is a member of t he fac ulty 
and the president of the Academic Activi- 
ties Board. Tfie guests enjoyed several 
selections by Bate's Collegians. Much 
enthusiasm was shown in the college 
songs and cheers. Ice cream and cake 
completed the program. 



The entering class of freshmen, with a 
total number of ISO students, has five 
more members than last year's class. 
While there were- ilS women students 

entering taet year, tln-ic- are 88 in the 

class of 1830, The increase speaks well 
for the college, for in spite of the- added 
expense of tuition there seems to be no 
diminishing of popularity of M.A.C. as a 
higher educational institution. It is ex- 
pected that there will be I few additional 
freshmen later. The complete list in the 
Regis! rar'l < Man to elate is as follows: 



Adams, Charles S. 


Woice-stcr 


Allen, Herbert A. 


Fitchburg 


Alien, Raymond C. 


11 olden 


Andrew, John A., Jr. 


West Box ford 


Armstrong, Robert L. 


East Sandwich 


At wood, Rachel 


( .recnfield 


Babson, Osman 


( iloucestcr 


Bailey, lleadley E. 


Jamaica, B.W.I. 


Barney, < icorge A. 


Hamilton 


Barms, ( '.eorge A. 


Lit hia 


Bartsch, Nelson E. 


Waverley 


Bedford, Harry 


Whitinsville 


Benoit, Edward G. 


Chicopee Falls 


Berggren, Stina M. O. 


Worcester 


Bernard, Sergius J. 


North Adams 


Billings, Samuel ( '. 


Belmont 


Bishop, Frank M. 


Nalie k 


Blac kintou, John R. 


L. Compton, K.I. 


Bond, R. IL, Jr. 


Need ha m 


Brown, Jessie E. 


Fitchburg 


Brown, Phillips ( '. 


1 ramingham 


Buckler, May F. 


I'lttsliclel 


Burbank, Oscar 1., Jr 


Won ester 


Burns, Theodore C. 


Taunton 


Call, Reuben II. 


( cilrain 


( ampliell, Harold \\ . 


I.eyden 


Clieiiowe-th, Winifred 1 


..\ciiih Amherst 


( levcland, .Maurice M 


East Pepperell 


Cook, Charles IL 


Beverly 


( 'otter, Monica Q, 


Somcrville 


Coven, Milton 1. 


Indian Orchard 


Crane, Kendall B. 


Millbury 


< unninghani, Robt. < 


. Quincy 


Daniels, A. Richards 


Dec Hi a m 


Davis, Arnold M. 


Berlin 


1 )ean, l.in ien W. 


Millis 


Decker, Charlotte M. 


Hotyoke 


Denny, M\ rtle- A. 


Northampton 


1 )enton, E. W'einyss 


Norton 


Dickey, Robert D. 


Merrimac 


Dix, Raymond A. 


V Springfield, Vt. 


Donovan, Margaret P 


. Bondsville 


Dorey, Albe-r! 1 . " 


Bih'he rtown 


1 lover, Evelyn 


Methnen 


Drew, Win. B 


< ,|. eliwii ll, ( t. 


Eldridge, Francis K. 


( .e-orgetown 


Ellert, Fred C 


Holyoke 


Fenton, J. Hopkins 


Winthrop 


Franklin, Paul F. 


Springfield 


Frost, l.duah 


Province-town 


< •auiuoncl, Alice 1 ). 


Southhridge 


< .iaiidomeniei), Stephen WalpoM 


< dick, Ina 1 


Amherst 


• loldberg, Max < 


Maiden 


t.oodell, Herbert A. 


Southhridge 


Goodefl, Hermon U. 


Southhridge 


t'.oodnow, Robert G 


Hopedale 


Grant, Win. E. 


N.-w York, N. Y. 


Grunwaldt, Lucy A. 


Springfield 


' num. Ralph E. 


S. Jacksonville, Fl. 


Haley, Edward F. 


Orange 


Hall, Addison S. 


A M field 


Hammond, Clarence E 


Ne e-dham 


Harris, (has. W'., Jr. 


Leominster 


Ilaiibre-nrciscr, Elsie 


Springfield 


Hemaa, Richard 


Gilbert ville 


1 line hey, Ann< 1 


Palmer 


lb, ward, |ohn B., Jr. 


Reading 


Howard, Lucius A. 


Ridgewood, N.J. 


Howard, Martin s. 


Northfield, Vt. 


Howe-, Norman M. 


( .reenfield 


Horwitt, Leonard 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


Hunt, Kenneth W 


Arlington 


Hunter, Howard W. 


Hotyoke 


Kenneth G. 


Amherst 


Jacobean, John 


V Dartmouth 


Jensen, H. W. 


Jamaica Plain 


Johnson, Catherine G. 


Amherst 


[one s, Fred W. 


Amherst 


Joy, Ji>hn L. 


Amherst 


Kingsbury, Kermit K. 


li ominster 


Kne-. bud, Ralph F., Jr 


. Attlelwro 


Knight, Kathryn R. 


Greenfield 


Lawlor.fohn T., Jr. 


Marblehead 


I.abarge, Robert R. 


Hoi yoke 


Lake, Walter S. 


Plainville 


I.e-ader, Anthony W. 


Worcester 


Leonard, John M. 


Fall River 


'Continued on Pafte 2) 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 1926 



TUF MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN of customs whieh had come down through SEVERAL CHANGES IN 

TMMAWAuiuatna ., ,.„„ „,n.,d ,,f .inu, b* w *«**| FACULTY ANNOUNCED 

Official MWHMptf ol tlu- MaSSaC&UMttl 

Agricultural College, PupHihed ever) 
Wednesda) b) the students. 



BOARD <)!• EDITORS 

Kelitoi-in-< "liit-t 
Managim Editoi 



Win iam I.. D"i ■ 27 
BLI swiikim K\ksaki> '2H 



Editorial 

AtliU-ti. * 
Canpoa Newi 



DEPAR1 WENT KDIToks 

Will IAM 1-. I >« »« I tl 

|1AK<.I.1> K. CLASS '2K 

Kkmm l. si-i s. ra '2»; 
W (.c.KDi.N II' sim 21t 

Will MM K. I'lllNMV ft 

Ki»w\ki> II. NM MU "*> 

Pbaw n C. H«« ' ■ -" 
jonentiMi Pahsst* "■ 



Faeulty Nsarf 

Jnti-riolli-tiiiiK- EdltOI 
Co- Ed News 



BIS1NKSS DEPARTMENT 

chaki.I'.s k. ( i \(.(. "27 i miw w M*mm 

Lawn ii wnnAKKK '27 AdvartWag Uamam 

Joan I Whiie - 27 < i" IlkUfaS MaiiiiK.-r 

l)nl (,l is W. LOSING '-'* 

Kiwis A. Wiidik '2H 

IIaroio K. Anski.i. 2(t 

Lawki.ni I. A ( AKKIIII '29 

Will. 1AM A. Kl.AN '2<t 



Subscription *2.(K) per year. Single 
copies Hlceiiis. Make all orders payable 
to The Massac hi HTN ( oi.i.ecian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as |>ossible. 



I-nte-n-d a s lllpinl rlSSI mutte-r ;it I hi- Amli.-rs! 

Post Office. Accepted for mallini si tpecuJ rate 
of pottage provided it >r in Metion 1108, Act <>t Oc- 
tober. 1!)17, authorized Augtltt -'•>. HUH. 



Welcome 

We an writing i)rincipally to the fresh- 
men; therefore, the numbers of the three 
upper classes need not read this editorial. 

Perhaps you have become hardened to 

welcomes and perhaps you are sick of 
them. However, Hich ■ repetition of 
welcomes from all source shows how 
whole-heartedly the college does bid you 
welcome. We are going to add another to 
the long list. The CotXEWAW board 
heartily welcomes you to Massachusetts 
Aggie. The most complimentary remark 
we can make is that you are no different 
from the oilier tre-luii.in classes that we 



time we have tried to see the problem 
from a broader point of vi*V, and as a 
result, we have changed our convictions 

considerably. 

In the lirM plate, similar changes are 
taking place throughout all the colleges 
of the country. Many colleges, with 
which we are well acquainted have almost 
completely abolished freshman rules. It 
is a tendency which is becoming more 
and more widespread. To buck this 
tendency on our part is like diving into 
a huge wave. We shall come to on the 
other side, left behind. 

Moreover, we have already made many 
changes and to rechangc to the old order 
would be retracing our steps. Pond 
parties have been abolished for over a 
year. Why should we go back a whole 
year just for the sake of renewing one 
sac red tradition? There have been many 
changes in the freshman rules this year. 
These changes haw been received with a 
spirit of resignation rather than one of 
enthusiasm. This attitude would seem to 
indicate that the student body were not 
wholly in favor of the change. 

Those who have expressed themselves 
against the change have used as a princi- 
pal argument, that college spirit has been 
torn down. We admit that it has; but, 
we believe now that it can be built up 
again in a much saner way than that of 
digging up skeletons. Of course, there are 
other reasons for the waning of college 
spirit, for example, varied interests. Years 
ago, a college man, especially one out in 
the wilds of Amherst, almost had to live 
on the campus, fot it was too difficult a 
process to go anywhere- else. It is not 
very hard now for a man to "go places". 
As we see it college- spirit, college 
patriotism, is a by-product of individual 
effort for one end. The members of any 
society all love that society if they all 
get out and work for the society. Lven 
three years ago we all boasted of our 
wonderful college spirit. What have we 
to boast of now? Let us get together and 
work up something to boast of. 

The most immediate way that we can 
get together and work for the good of 
the college is through these same tradi 




have mc 11 at Aggie. We see in you all 

the possibilities of your predecessors. We 

see the usual failings of college men in i 

" ' , . , , ,-. tons that we have been fighting about 

the bltd; but we already see a rosy tint , — " ... . f . 



showing through the calyx 

All welcomes seem to be followed by- 
friendly hints. We wish to second the 
remarks made under the text, "Do not 
tweedle away your oodles and oodles of 
time." You may be filled with the idea 
that you are going to spend every minute 
poring over books and attending clases 
so that you cannot take on any extra- 
curriculum activities. Most of us, however 
have discovered that there is still time 
for one thing or another, in some cases, 
for two or three things. Mr. Jones pointed 
out, at the reception last Friday night, 
that for your own good you should engage 
in some extra-curriculum activity. Such 
a statement may be looked at from another 
angle. Probably you have been told 
already that you are the ho|>e of the 
college. In any case, the fact remains; 
you are the hope of the college. It is 
for your class as individuals and as a 
group to take up the work of the college. 
The various athletic teams must be sup- 
plied with men from your class, the glee- 
club must have members from your class, 
the CoLLSGlAM will soon call for volun- 
teers for its staff, the Roister Doisters 
will need new material, and three years 
from now, the undergraduate leaders in 

every branch of the college will be picked 

from your ranks. Do not let your latent 
abilities be wasted, but give them to the 
college and so improve them by the 
giving. Just because you have never given 
yourself a chance is no alibi for continuing 
to hide your light under a bushel. Many- 
men have developed from non-partici- 
pants in athletics to leading athletes. 
Many who have never acted have been 
given lead parts in college dramatics. It 
is no sin to try a thing and then find you 
are not fitted for it; the sin is in failing 
to try when you could just as well as not. 
If you have never tried you do not know 
what your possibilities are. 



Whether you are satisfied with the fresh- 
man rules or not, they stand as the 
freshman rules of Massachusetts Aggie. 
They are the college's for the members 
of the college to live up to. We admit 
that the rules require less of the freshmen 
and there is less to get excited about. But 
this very fact makes the challenge to 
support them whole-heartedly all the 
greater. The sophomores are the ones 
who are most directly concerned. If is 
for them to do the work ol enforcing the 
rules. Let us see if the class of 1929 can 
do its duty as it should! It is for the 
Senate to boss the job. The Senate, in 
the past, has sat back and handed out 
the penalties and let it go at that. The 
Senate is the leader, it can do more than 
any other group or individual to make 
these rules successful. The frosh, of 
course, must not l>e forgotten. It is for 
them to co-operate with their lords and 
masters and reaped the orders from above. 
The other two classes seem to think that 
they did their duty in years past and that 
campus rules are for their amusement and 
for nothing else. However, a little urging, 
an occasional criticism, and respect for 
the mandates of the Senate, in short, 
the showing of a little interest would do 
an immense amount of good. We can all 
co-operate; and, if we do, we shall not 
have to worry alxnit the effect of taking 
away rules and customs. There is more 
than the rules at stake, the most funda- 
mental part of the college organization, 
the college spirit must be kept burning. 



A number of additions have been made 
to the MAC faculty this summer. The 
number of new appointment! is somewhat 
larger than usual. Several graduates of 
the college are among the new members 
of the faculty. L. l-eland Durkee, Philip 
II. Couhig, and Linus A. f.avin are the 
representatives from the class of 1096, 
Philip Couhig is an instructor !n Physical 
Education and will have charge of fresh- 
man athletics, lie succeeds Malromb K. 
Tumey and is well known for his prowess 
on the football field. L Leland Durkee 
has been appointed instructor in Carman 
to take the place of Paul Keller. Linus 
Gavia another star of last year's team is 
back in the capacity of line coach. He 
succeeds (ieorge Cotton '22. 

Other new members of the faculty who 
are graduates of the college are Chauncey 
Gilbert '25 who will take the place of 
Cordon King as instructor in Zoology. 
Linus H. Jones '16 will hold the position 
of Assistant Research Professor of Botany. 
Mr. Jones received his degree of M.Sc. 
from this college in 1919 and received his 
Ph.D. from Rutgers I'niversity. Willard 
A. Munson '05 takes up the duties of 
the Director of the Extension Service in 
the place of John D. Willard who resigned 
last spring. 

Mr. Gerald J. Stout comes to the 
college from Michigan State College to 
be instructor in Vegetable Cardening. 
Mr. Harold D. Houtelle, H.S., Ch.E., is 
a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute and takes the place of C.eorge 
Shumway as instructor in Mathematics. 
Dr. Miles H. Cubbon, a graduate of 
Cornell I'niversity, will hold the position 
of Assistant Professor of Agronomy. Dr. 
Frederick M. Cutler will hold the position 
of Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology. 
He is a graduate of Columbia I'nive-rsity 
and has taken advanced degrees at Cnion 
Theological Seminary and Clark I'niver- 
sity. He is a teacher of wide experience 
and is also an ex-captain in the United 
States Army. 

James E. Fuller, A.M., comes to the 
college to fill the position of instructor in 
Microbiology. He is a graduate of Colo- 
rado College and was Assistant Professor 
of Biology there this past year. Oliver 
W. Kelley, a graduate of the Colorado 
Agricultural College and a graduate stu- 
dent at M.A.C. this last year, will be an 
instructor in Agronomy. 

Alfred Nicholson, M.A., takes the place 
of Belding F. Jackson as instructor of 
English. He is a graduate of Princeton 
University. 

Richard W. Smith returns to the college 
this fall, after a year's leave of absence, as 
Assistant Professor of Dairying. He has 
had a year's further experience and training 
in this subject at the University of Illinois 
and he is well fitted to carry on as a 
teacher in this department. 

Marion K. Forbes takes the place of 
Harriet Woodward as Assistant State 



John Temple is going to attend the 

Harvard Medical School this year. 

Davenport is the manager of a farm 
in Fast Colrain. Mass. 

Phil ( ouhig is the coach of freshman 
athleticsat M.A.C. this year. 

Buck Sweetlaad is landscaping la Ohio. 

Al Stevens is working in the Brockway- 
Smith Corporation warehouse- in Boston. 
He is planning on starting at the bottom 
and some clay writing an article in the 
American Magazine on how 1 worked up 
to president from shipper's assistant. 

Harry Fraser is a landscape? for the 
City of Haverhill. 

Tiny Thurlow is working for his father 
on the Cherry Hill Nurseries. 

Red Sullivan studied at Cornell this 
summer. He is going back to Deerfield 
Acad my this fall. 



AT THE ABBEY 



Marcus, Theodore 
Maylott, Gertrude 
McChesney, Herb. L. 
Mc Isaac, Donald W. 
Miller, Walter E. 
Morgan, Isabel E. 
Morawski, Farle L. 
Morse, Beryl F. 
Mullen, Edwin J. 
Murphy, Donald F. 
Murray, Kathryn ('.. 
Nelson, Cordon 
Nims, Russell E. 
Noble, George W. 
Noyes, George H. 
O'Connor, Eileen 
Parksarian, John 
Parks, Stillman H. 
Patch, Fldrcel K. 
Paulson, John E. 
Phinney, Paul T. 
Phinney, Wallace S. 
Pillsbury, W. Gale 

Putin, Ida 

Pottala, Arne E. 
Potter, Stuart II. 
Pray, Francis C. 
Purely, Wilfred G. 
Pyle, Arthur G. 
RapittS, Harry E. 
Riley, Yincent J. 
Renaud, Hector H. 
Robertson, Harold M 
Ronka, Lauri 
Roper, Harold J. 
Root, John C. 
Rosa, Albert U. 
Rubin, Theodore 
Salikorn, Lamchiag J 
Sanl»rn, Alice G 



Roxbury 
Worcester 
W. Springfield 
East Weymouth 
Bethany 

Schenectady, N.Y 
Attleboro 
Southbridge 
Holyoke 
Lynn 
Lee 

Roslindale 
Greenfield 
Pittsfield 
Haverhill 
Worcester 
Franklin 
Gloucester 
Stoneham 
Holyoke 
Hyde Park 
Willimansc-tt 
Amesbury 
Sheffield 
Fitchburg 
Framingham 
Amherst 
Merrimac 
Plymouth 
Agawam 
Sommcrsct 
Walpole 
. Leyden 
( iloucester 
Westminster 
N. Attleboro 
East Boston 
Springfield 
. Washington, D.C 
Attleboro 



Fast Sunday afternoon at four o'clex k 
the Y.W.C.A. gave an informal reception 
in the Rhododendron Gardens in hi. 
of the new girls who have just joined 
the group at the Abbey. Almeda Walker 
'27, chairman of the organization, pre- 
sented the women members of the faculty 
who were present to the girls. Refresh- 
ments in the form of "hot dogs" aiul 
apples were served on the top of the hill. 

M 

(ieorge Hanscomb '25 and Mary T. 
Boyd '20 were married at Ortega, Florida, 
July 10, 1920. 

M 

Ruth Putnam '20 spent the week-end 
at the Abbey. 

M 

Rachel Purrington and Margaret M. 
O'Connor both of the class of '28 have 
entered Simmons College this fall. 

M 

Barbara Hall ex'28 is teaching in 
llvannis, Mass. 

M 



Adelaide Prentiss ex'28 has entered the 
B. U. School of Art. 



FRATERNITIES GET 

MANY FRESHMEN 

(Continued from Page I < 
Theta Chi 

1930 Denton, E. W. 

Adams, Charles S. Gunn, Ralph E. 
Cook, Charles H. I larris, C. W., Jr. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



1929 
Henderson, E. S. 
Young, P. T. 



1930 
Dix, R. 

Wacchter, P. H., 
Young, E. 
Ciandominico, S. 
Alpha Sigma Phi 



1929 
C limey. George G. 

1930 
Bishop, Frank M. 
B Lie king! on, J. R. 
Cunningham, Robt. 
Jacobson, John 
Joy, John 

Kneeland, Ralph F, 
Mclsaac, Donald 
Morawski, Earle L. 
Murphy, Donald F. 
Miller, Walter E. 



Parks, Stillman 
Riley, Yincent J. 
Rosa, Albert U, 
Kingsbury, K. K. 
Pillsbury, W. Gale 
Pyle, Arthur 
Sederepiist, Arthur 
Shepard, Lawrence 
Singleton, Eric 
Skogsburg, Frank 
Tomfohrde, K. M 
Wa"- ,n 
Wc 



Club Leader in the Extension Service. 
She will have charge of Home Economic s 
Extension Work with boys and girls 
throughout Massachusetts. Miss Forbes 
has been Assistant Club Leader in Middle- 
sex County where she has been very 
successful in conducting a very popular 
and efficient junior extension service. 
Marion L. Tucker is returning to the 
college from her studies at Columbia 
I'niversity, to fill the position of Assis- 
tant Professor of Home E co n om ic s made 
vacant by the resignation of Miss Mary 
A. Bartley. Miss Tucker was formerly 
Extension Specialist at the college and 
her return is very gratifying to her many 
friends. 



New Plan for Freshman 

Discussion Groups 

Upper Classmen as well as Freshmen 
Invited to Attend. 



Elmer E, Barber, 
Remember, We are welcoming you to ' Christian Association 
M.A.C, to its halls of learning not re- 
stricted to the class room but including 
the Whole campus, and to a place- where 
you will find duty and r e spon sib ility as 
well as stuck and pleasure. 



on 



J 



secretary of the 
plans to conduct 
the- freshman discussion groups on a new 
plan this year. Instead of confining the 
meetings to freshmen alone-, uppe-re lass 
met! are- invited to attend. Mr. Barber 
will not lead these discussions, but will 
arrange to have different members of the 
faculties of both Amherst College and 

M.A.C. take charge. These- iiii-n will 

ion was heard speak to the assembled groups, answer 
any questions which may be brought up, 

and direct the dtSCUSStons by the- students. 
It is planned to have tin or I do/e-n of 
these- discussions, the time for which will 



More on Traditions 
Last year editorials were written 

traditions and nun li dis 

about the campus on the same subject. 

Most of llic- discussion was confined to 

discussing the abolition of definite tradi- 
tions. At that time- WC were as rabid M 
any in denouncing the wholesale slaughter j be- announced later 



UNLIMITED CUTS 

TO HIGH STUDENTS 

Continued from PaRe 1) 
tinga '28, Sarah T. Plantinga '28, Marjorie 
J. Pratt '2S, Frank Stratton '2K, Alden 
P. Tuttle '28, Stephen Adams '20, Stanley 
F. Bailey '29, Irene L. Bartlett "SB, 
Kendall K. Davis '29. Walter G. Hunter 
'29, Alice L. Johnson '29, Janet M. 
Jones '2«.l, Constantine P. Laelas '2<>, 

Warren H. Lyman '29, Taylor Iff. Mills 

•39, Earl C. Pronty '2«», John Iff. Regan 

'•_><•, Leonard F. Sargent '-".», Walter E. 

Southwi.k '2«i. Phillips B. Ste-e-re '29 and 
F.arle A. Tompkins '2'.l. 

KNTKRING CLASS ONF OF 

LARGEST IN HISTORY 

Continued from I'afte I] 

l.cH.mis, Randall M. Easthamptou 

Loud, Miriam J. IMaiulield 

I Mid-, l.e wis M. Taunton 

MaeCauslanel.Maliel.Y West Newton 
Madden, An hie II. No\ a Scot ia, Mass 

Mann, Raymond S. Dakon 



Sandstrom, Evelyn C. Auburn 
Saraceni, Raphael 
Schantz, Joseph H. 
Scrima, Paul A. 
Sederquist, A. B., Jr. 
Shepard, Moody L. 
Singleton, Eric 
Sirois, John J. 
Skogsberg, Frank A. 
Sleeper, Ralph E. 
Smith, Raymond F. 
Smith, Reginald 
Smith, WinthropG. 
Spooner, Laurence W. 
Stacy, Paul 
Stanford, Sixmcer C. 
Stanisiewski, Leon 
Stevenson, Errol B. 
Stone, Ruth W. 
Suhr, Maurice 
Sullivan, Pauline E. 
Sullivan, Wm. N\, Jr. 
Swett, Margaret E. 
Swift, Frances H. 
Swift, G. Dean 
Taft, Jesse A. 
Taft, Roger S. 
Tank, J. Richard 
Thatcher, Christine 
Tiffany, Don C. 
Tilton, Arthur F., Jr. 
Tomfohrde, Karl M. 
Tudryn, Fid ward W. 



Sigma Phi E. 






Lynn 

Alletown, Pa. 

Monson 

Auburndale 

West Boylston 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Andover 

Worcester 

Rowley 

Needham 

W. Springfield 

Needham Heights 

Brimfield 

Webster 

Rows 

Amherst 

Brockton 

Holyoke 

Holyoke 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Gloucester 

Springfield 

Melrose 

Mendon 

Sterling 

Chatham, N.Y. 

Cummington 

Cambridge 

Salem 

W. Somervillc 

Hadley 

Milford 



1929 
Albert i, Frank 
Tourtellot, Samuel 

1930 
Armstrong, R. L. 
Bernard, Sergius J. 
Burns, Theodore C. 
Howard, John B. 
Hunter, Howard W. 
Lynd, Lewis 
Mann, Raymond 



Mi 

Ne on Gordon 
Noble, (ieorge 
Pot tola, Aine E. 
Sirois, John 
Tank, Richard 
Saraceni, Raphael 
Stanford, Spencer 
Taft, Roger S. 
White, F. T., Jr. 
Zuger, Albert P. 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



1928 
Schappelle, N. A. 

1930 
Andrew, John A. 
Allen, Raymond C. 
Bedford, Harry 
Brown, Philip C. 



Cleveland, M. 
Davis, Arnold If. 
Goodell, Herb. A. 
Goodell, H. U. 
Lawler, John 
Stevenson, Errol 
Tilton, Arthur F. 



Delta Phi Alpha 

1929 1930 

Berman, Hyman Coven, Milton I. 

Lynsky, Myer Goldberg, Max ( 

Poltenson, Hyman I. Marcus, Theodore 
Simcovitz, Robert Suher, Maurice 
Kappa Epsilon 

1929 Phinney, Wallace 

Winton, Alexander Scrima, Paul A. 



1930 
Benoit, Edward G. 
Ives, Kenneth 



Paulson, '"' 

Raplus, 

(Incompl 



SI 



Wadleigh, Cecil H 

Wacchter, Peter H., Jr. Walpole 

Warren, Allen J. New Haven, C 

Wells, Marie E. 

White, Frank T., Jr. 

White, Harold J. 

Williams, Inez W. 

Woodcock, Alf'elH. 

Wood, PriscillaG. 

vYoodia, Elizabeth M 

Yeatman, Alwvn F. 

Young, Edward II. 
Zuger, Albert P. 



Nova Scotia 
Holbrook 
Brighton 
Brockton 
Daytona Be ach .Fla. 

\V. Bridgewater 

. Adams 

Springfield 
Northampton 
New Haven, Ct. 



Oberlin College has recently appointed 
a committee to see- what can be done- to 
make the- college more attract ivc to men, 

in order to increase the male attendance. 
lb- suggests, "Why not improve the 
quality ol the co«ede? w 



AMES TO HEAD R.O.T.C 

(Continued from Page I) 

Staff Sergeants 

Donald R. Lane Squadron Sergt. Major 
Horace T. Brockway Color Sergeant 

George S. Tulloch Color Sergeant 

Sergeants 

TROOP A 

Stanley G. Blejmquist 
Dana J. Kidder, Jr. 
Robert A. Lincoln 
Cecil C. Rice 
Edwin S. White 

TROOP B 
Bertram II. Holland 
Kenneth Me Kittrick 
Harold L Morhmd 

Albion B. Kicker 
Hart well F. Roper 

TROOP C 
Thomas W. Ferguson 
Robert L I'ox 
Robert J. Karrer 
Ernest I.. StR-ncer 
Warren J. Tufts 
Continued on Pnjte 4i 



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AMHERST. MASS. 



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Kodaks and Films, Victrolas, Victor Records 

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PLUMBING AND HEATING 



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UNITED STATES HOTEL 

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BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



FOOTBALL TEAM COMING FAST 

Con i in net! from I'.iur |i 
out with injuries and illnes>, but the- lad 

named quartet should l>c- in action aoon. 

t'exjk, one ol the three remaining I * 1 1 « ■ i 
men, has been shitteil lioin end to lull- 
back, while several oilier ehakeupe have 
taken place in the effort to develop a 

smooth- working aggregation. 
Evidence ol the rivalry lor poeitione on 

the team is found in the close scon- ol last 
Saturday's practice session, in which A 
nosed out B, 7-0, with a touchdown in 
the first period. The game- was not 
spectacular for, although the pJayere arc- 
well-grounded in fundamentals, inexperi- 
ence prevents polished football being ex- 
hibited. The improvement made during 
the next two weeks will determine- largely 
the possibilities of winning at least half 
of the encounters scheduled. 

The lineup for A team on Saturday in- 



e hide d (Jiiaui, Cook, III. ill, and lulls 

in the backfield; McKit trick and Rice, 
ends; Walk* ten ami Cart wright, guards; 

Mine', u^li ,,ii. | \ni-r. In, tacklee; .end 
Mills, center, lean! II was made up ol 
Tuttle, Speltnan, Karrer, and Nitkiewicr, 

backs; Sullivan ami Howie, ends; Nobb 

and Plantinga, guards, Helton and Andei 

son, tackl) s; and Mulli in at center. 

I he- schedule this year does not include 

games v\ ; th Norwich and Lowell Tech, 

but WY.Iian s. one "I the "Little Three", 

will be met instead. Advance repofti 
prophesy \i teratl teams as op|K)luut- ol 

the Agates. The li-' of contests follows: 

Oct. 2— Hales at M U \ 

\\ Comic die in Aggie a< M.A.C. 

HI- Williams al WiUiamstosrn 

-'.; W.IM.ai W. ...si,-. 

30 An hem al M.VC 
Nov. ii Springfie Id Ct ll> x<' at ffp'ghetd 

L'0- Tofts ai Medford 



1 930 
M. A. C. STATIONERY 

Old Hampshire Vellum 
A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

I PLBA8ANT STRBBT. (up ... ai*>t) 

(Hull* I. Prescription. FlUcM. Br.k«a Imm 
accurately r.pUcarf 

BIG BBN At ARM CXOCB8 sad •*•* 
cli.bl. makcM 



The Rest in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Rest in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 




With thm hmmimpharicml integrator thm illuminating angin—r mamauram light 
intanaitiaa and distribution. Thaaa laboratory finding* arm piactically 
apptiad to improve our avaryday illumination. 

When the sun goes down 

More than 350,000,000 incandescent lamps, wrth a 
combined light of nine billion candlepower, make 
city streets, stores, and homes brighter than ever 
before. 

In bungalow or mansion, workshop or factory, 
dormitory or auditorium, there is no excuse for 
poor illumination. We have cheaper and better 
lighting in the electric lamp than ever before; for 
the dollar that bought 1,115 candlepower-hours of 
light with the carbon-filament lamps of 1886, 
now buys 16,200 candlepower-hours of light with 
the MAZDA lamps. 

Not only more light, but correctly applied light, is 
the order of the day. The electric lamp, with its 
nameless yet highly concentrated light source, 
lends itself ideally to reflectors, shades, and screens. 
It is controlled light — safe light. And illumina- 
tion becomes an exact science. 

During college days and in after life, correct light- 
ing must ever be of paramount importance to the 
college man and woman. Good lighting is the 
worthy handmaiden of culture and progress. 



The General Electric 
Company is the world's 
largest manufacturer of 
incandescent lamps. And 
behind the G-E MAZDA 
lamps are vast research 
laboratories dedicated 
to cheaper and better 
electric ilium j na t ion , and 
to the conservation of 
eyesight. 

A series of G-E adver- 
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electricity is doing in 
many fields will be sent 
on request. Ask for 
booklet GEK-1. 




44 «ir>M 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 



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(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUfLDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Maun St., Amherst, Mass 

Our , sundry Firal Clin.* 

Our P.llry C;uarant«««l 

RBPAIRING AND ALL KINDS or 

WASHIsr, IKiNK AT REASONABLE 
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Ops—I ts PtMl eifii. ,- 



LET'S GO! 

We take great pleasure in welcoming back the upper classmen; and in extending our best wishes to the class of 1930. 
We offer for your approval a line of CLOTHING FOR FALL that is unsurpassed. Come in and compare. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HVANNIS 

AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 22, 1926 



IMPORTANT! 

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with Oil* summer- 

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Jewelry Service Station 

Tel. 541 -VV 

46 Pleasant St. - Amherst. Mass. 



You will nnd an eicellant 

SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the mo.t up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
uuof SHINING PARLOR 
at mfi&St" " ^.brovltz Block 

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pared to meet your needs, 
ill work guaranteed. Shoes skined and dyed, 

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Men » Half Soles. Rubber HeeU - - • «•" 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - - '•» 

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Open tillS P.M. 



We, too, have 

JUST RETURNED 

(from a buying trip) 

Gifts 

Greeting Cards 

Articles for your Room 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



AMES TO HEAD R.O.T.C. UNIT 

Continued from PaU«* I) 

TROOP D 
( .ordon E. Bears* 
Francis Crowley 
Robert D. Hem 
Charles J. Smith, Jr. 
John B. Zielinski 

SERVICE TROOP 

Charles E. Clifford 
Walter R. Smith 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



"Pointer Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



The Geology department of Princeton 
University gave what is believed to DC 
the first university course on "wheel-" 
I** summer. A party of professors and 
undergradutes travelled about ten thou- 
sand miles in a Pullman ear in order to 
make a thorough study of the geology 
and the natural resources of the United 
States. 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 
Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Not just a hurried sab lure, but 
tinued sei\ in and satisfaction long after 

the cost oi your radio i> forgotten. 

Authorized Dealer R. C. A. 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANE 



WELCOME TO AGGIE STUDENTS! 

We have already in stock the most up-to- 
date Oxfords for college wear, also we uvt 

established > *>"»• repsirtns ttepsftmset m 

naction with >>ur regular shoe store. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



G. Edward Fisher 



DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



Following the example set by Harvard 
University a few weeks ago, the faculty 
of Yale University has announced that 
after a certain rank in scholarship has 
been attained by members of the senior 
class, they may attend lectures and 
classes at their own discretion. 



Butler University has abandoned final 
exams and has substituted a series of 
quizzes throughout the year to determine 
final grades, 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 



BRBRY'SBAKM)) 



JAMES^TlOWELL, bookseller 
M. A. C. Seal Die Stamped Stationery 



Ripple or Corded Finish 

$1.00 Boxes 

NOW 

79c 



Letter Packets 

50c 

NOW 

35c 



BOSTON1ANS" 

START THE FALL TERM 
RIGHT. BUY A PAIR OF 
BOSTONIANS. A REAL COL- 
LEGE SHOE . • • 



BOLLES SHOE SI ORE 

AMHERST 



MAIN STREET 








L C O M E 



We're glad to have you with us again. 
Glad to see the older classmen again and 
to greet the newcomers. 

As usual we are ready with a com- 
plete line of high grade clothing of all 
kinds for college men at prices that are 
as low as the lowest, and lower than 
most. • 

Black crew neck sweaters at $6 to $ 

NONE FINER MADE 







10 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



When 

peg-tops 

were in flower 

PRINCE ALBERT has been the campus favorite 
since the days of long-haired fullbacks, high 
button shoes, turtle-neck sweaters, and hand- 
painted dormitory cushions. This same won- 
derful tobacco is even moire popular in these 
days of plus-fours. 

And no wonder. Throw back the hinged 
lid of the familiar red tin and release that rare 
aroma of real tobacco! Tuck a load into your 
pipe and pull that fragrant P. A. smoke up the 
stem! That's Prince Albert, Fellows! Nothing 
like it anywhere, 

When problems press and your spirits slip 
over into the minus column, just get out your 
jimmy-pipe and load up with this really friendly 
tobacco. P. A. is so kind to your tongue and 
throat and general disposition. Buy a tidy red 
tin today* 

FRINGE ALBERT 

—no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. I* told everywhere h$ 
tidy red lini, found and hMf- 
pound tin humidors, smd 
pound crystal-glass humidort 
with tponge-moistener top. 
And always with erery 
of bite and parch ran" 
the Prince Alb' 





© 1926, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



COl „!gf daS 2" a^Reaay-to-Wear and Tailored to Order. 



Cleaning, *£«£££*%*:* HEADQUARTERS. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUM 



(gfo fMaflMrfrttfigtifi (Enlkgtan 



Vol. xxxvn. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29, 2926 



Number 2 



CHANGES IN CUT 
SYSTEM EXPLAINED 

Honor Students in Three Upper 
Classes Receive Unlimited Cuts, with 
Reservations. 



I he change in the tut system which 
u.is announced last spring term is now in 
vogue. This change is ot interest to 
those students who attain an average oi 
v", or over as they will be granted un- 
limited cuts as long as they maintain 
their average. 

The discussion which brought about 
tats change in the system \\a> started 
last fall at the Student Forum. \o 
definite action was taken at that time 
although the majority of the undcr- 
! nates were in favor that unlimited 
. uts be allowed those students who achieve 

a prescribed average for a definite period. 

I hiring this past spring term the adminis- 
tration considered the question and de- 
rided on the present poUcy. 

Under the new system a list of names, 
which will 1h- divided into three gr o ups , 
will be posted at the beginning of each 
term on the Dean's Hoard. All those 
students whose- average grade foe the 
preceding term lies between '.*> and 1(H) 
will make up < iroup I; those between .K."> 
nil (H) (iroup II, and those between XU 
ind 85 GfOUp 111. Those students within 
Continued on Pafte 2 



Work on Index 
To Begin at Once 

First Croup Pictures on October i. 
Competition for Open Positions on 
Board Now Under Way. 



Notable Paintings 

On Exhibition 



Prof. Waugh Responsible for Display 
«>l Paintings and Charcoal Portraits. 



\n Manual exhibition of oil paintings 
and charcoal |>ortraits by OKndo Rieci is 
now on exhibition in the Memorial Build- 
up. The exhibition is unusual becanee "t 
the versatility which Mr. Ricci's work 
tbows. Mis jiortraits are especially tine 
sad two of his paintings have won the 
first prize in the National Academy of 
I lesign. 

Sevan! of the subjects are familiar to 
Amherst people. Many of the pictures 
wire made here recently, as Mr. Rieci 
ipent the summer working in Amherst. 
Although the pictures now shown have 
been on exhibition at the Jones Library, 
several additions have bean made to the 
roMrrtiea since then. Prof. Frank A. 
Waugh is to be thanked for the exhibition 
which contains pi ctu res to delight the 
fancy of nearly e v er yon e, and the two 

|>ri/.e winners entitled, "The- Struggle" 
•tnd "The Feat" are worthy of more- than 

•i passing fiance. 



TRACK AND CROSS-COUNTRY 

AROUSE MUCH INTEREST 



Harriers Meet Tufts October 9 in 
First Race of Season. 



•Her seventy-five men, including the 

*- country sepjad, are out for fall 

'r ii k, and Coach Derby may arrange an 

interclass track meet later on if the 

interest shown warrants one. 

lime trials for the harriers will Ir- held 
thin Saturday to determine the personnel 
"' the team which will meet Tufts in the 
initial race of the season on Oc tober Oth. 

With five letter-men, Captain Crooks, 

won, Nottebaert, Swan, ami P re st on, 

available for the cross country squad! as 

is Forest and He nn eber ry , two 

■ u hill-anel-dalers. on hand, .mother 
-itii year is anticipated. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday 

(>. m. Collegian Competition, 

Collegian office. 

uex Compel it ion. Index < Knee. 
Thursday 
v j Assembly. 

00 p. m . 00 Man Rope Pull. 
Prida) 

90p.m. Mass Meeting, Target Pit 
' *5 p. in. Parade leaves O.TA . 

House. 
Saturday 

rsity football, Bates at Alumni 
Field. 
^ ednesday 
Mountain Day. 



Preliminary arrangements for taking 
photographs for the RI2K Index have- 
been made, and the first installment of 
group pictures will be taken on Sundav , 
October •'{. at the Kinsman Studio in the 

Lincoln Building. 

The pictures will be- taken at fifteen 
minute intervals, so promptness in mect- 
iiiVi several minutes before the scheduled 

time will be essential. All the co operation 

the various organi/at ions tan give will be 

greatly appreciated by the fades board. 

Individual pictures of the juniors will 
probably be taken early in the first week 

of Octo ber. Further announcements will 
l>e forthcoming in time- to avoid conflicting 
dates. 
Although the stafl <>t the- 1MB Index 

has not been fully decided on at present, 

ne vert he-less the preliminary details are 
being worked out l»v the beads of the 

various departments until the board is 

completely organised Competition for 

the other positions on the board is now 
under way. All members of the junior 

class who are interested ami wish to 
compete should re-|>oit at the Index office, 
tonight, at s o'clock. 

The he-ads e>| the various departments 

of the 1088 Index wen- elected last Com* 
mencement by the 1027 Index Hoard. 

Harold K. (lark was appointed F.d it fir- 
m-Chief and Albion H. Richer as Husiness 
Manager. They will be assisted by Lrne-st 
L. Spencer, Literary Editor; Dana J. 

'Continued on Page i> 



CORRECTED LIST OF 

FRAT. PLEDGES 



With apolog i es, the Collegian re- 
prints the list ol pledges of the following 
three- fraternities. 

Theta Chi 

I'M) Pyle, Arthur (.. 

Adams, Charles S. Scdcnpiist, A. H. Jr. 

Cook, Charles H. Shepard, Moody L. 

Denton, K. W. Singleton, Kric 

( lunn, Ralph K. Skogsburg, Frank A. 

Harris. ( . W. Jr. Toinfohrdc, Karl W. 

Kingsbury, K. K. Warren, Allen J. 

Pillsbury, W. Gale Woodcock, A. H. 
Alpha Sigma Phi 

1880 Murphy, Donald F. 

Caaney, Ge o rge G. Miller, Walter E. 

1880 Parks. St illmaii 

Bishop, Frank M. Riley, Vincent J. 

Hlatkington. J. R. Ross, Allien I. 

Cunningham, Root. Sa ra ce ni , Raphael 

Ja ckob se n , John Stanford, S|x-ncer 

Joy John Taft. Roger S. 

Km-eland. Ralph F. White. F. T. Jr. 

Me Isaac. Donald Zuger, Aliiert P. 
Morawski, Farle L. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

1880 Lynd, Lewis 

Al b erti . Frank Mann, Raymond 

Tourtellot, Samuel Mullen, Edwin 

1080 Nelson, ( •ordon 

Armstrong, R. I.. Noble, < ieorge- 

Bernard, Sergius J. Pbttote, Arm- E, 

Hums, Theodore C. Sirois, John 

Howard, John B. lank. Richard 
Hunter, Howard W. 



Early Start for 

2 -Year Football 



Only Three Letter Men will Return 
to Form Nucleus of 1926 Club. 



Only three letter men, including cap- 
tain-elect Hurrill. will re|>ort for Two- 
Near football practice which begins on 
Tuesday, S e p te m be r 28th. Registration 

will not take- place until October 4th, but 

an early start in football is imperative 

because Of the nearness of the- first 

scheduled «<•'">■ "" October 12th. 

Coach Hall has announced a partially 
completed schedule which includes con- 
tests with some of the Strongest "prep" 
BChoo! and freshmen te-anis in this v icinit v. 
The date-s are- as follow-: 

Oct. l- M.A.C Freshmen hen-. 

l.", Conn. Akuic Freshmen here. 
22- Vermont Academj here. 
30 Open. 

I'itt-tield High School here. 
13 Trinity Freshmen at Hartford. 
icj—Deerfield Academv at Deerfield. 



Nov 



1°2H INDEX PHOTOGRAPHS 

SCHEDULED FOR SUNDAY 

MORNING. OCTOBER i 



!l. 

«.» 

10. 
10. 
10. 
10 

II 
II 
II 
II 
I? 



lit) — Interfraternity Conference 
4.-> Q.T.V. 

(Ml— L.C.A. 

I.". K.C..I'. 

:«>— K.K. 
45— T.C. 
00 S.I'.F. 

ir» A.G.R. 
80 A.S.P. 

f.-» K.S. 
.(Ml I'.S.K. 

i:. D.P.A. 



MAX. TEAMS AT 

EASTERN STATES 



Individuals Do Excellent Work in 
Judging Dairy Cattle, Dairy Products, 
and Fat Cattle. 



One of the outstanding features of the- 

Eastern States Exposition each year is 

the group of intercollegiate judging con- 
tests. In this year's content the- Massa 
chusettS teams st»io<l ninth in Dairy 
Cattle, third in Dairy Products and 
fifth in I- at Stoe-k with nine, four and six 

teams competing respectively. However 

(Continued on Paite 2) 



Athletic Meet Won 

by R.O.T.C Unit 

Harvard, Yale, and Norwich De- 
feated by M.A.C. Team at Fort 
Ethan Allen. 



The R.O.T.C. I nit, at Fori I than 
Allen last summer, won the silver loving 
CSjp, offcre-d by the Post F.xchange of 
Fort Ft han Allen, for excelling in ath- 
letics. There were three- other teams 
competing for the- MUM cup, Harvard, 
Vale, and Norwich. It is to Ik- noted that 
the enecaea <>f the M.A.C. team was 
brought afjOBt ptintipu'ly by the- head 
(Continued on l*aa«- 4) 



Candidates Report 

for Fall Baseball 



Six Veterans of 1926 Team Among 
Those Reporting to Coach Ball. 

Six veterans of the 1880 baseball nine- 
have report e d fe>r fall practice, which con- 
sists mainly of impromptu names between 
two teams. Captain Me Vcy at first, 
Mortality at short. "Norm" Nash on the 
rubber, and Griffin ami Thompson ill the 
outer nanlen were regular pmfuillliri last 
spring, while BriggS saw considerable 
action behind the plate. Haertl ami Rice, 
regular infielders, are playing football and 
therefore are unable to be present. 

Other candidates for positions are lane- 
'Continued on Pafte 1) 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 
CompetJtiea for the Editorial De- 
partment of the CoLLi-:<;iAN. Open to 

m e mb e r s of the iwe> lowe-r classes, 

iK-gins Wednesdav evening at e-i^ht 

o'clock in the Memorial Building, and 

will run daring the remainder of the 
term. A large number of candidates 

is desired. 

ROPE PULL 
Tin- long postponed Freshman- 
Sophomore sixty-man rope pull will 

lake place next Thursday afternoon 
at 4 p. m.. rain or shine. Consequently, 
there will be no Assembly this week. 



MASS MEETING 

The first mass meeting of the vear 

will be held at the Pit on Friday 
evening, October I, at 7 p. 111. The 
parade starts in front of the Q.T.V. 

house at 6.46. Every member ol the 
student body should make an ellort to 
be present. The team which will 
represent Aggie in the clash with 

Bates on Saturday is a "nn-en" team, 

and the- kind of stip|>ort which it is 
given by the undergraduates will un- 
doubtedly be reflected in the- playing 

of the team. Let ever y one show his 
loyalty to the < <>li- 



Football Season 



Opens Saturday 



Bates to Bring Veteran Team. Aggie Lineup Still 

Uncertain. 



R. 0. T. C. CORPS 

UNUSUALLY LARGE 



Many Juniors Elect Advanced Course. 
Total Enrolment Includes 262 Men. 

Sixteen seniors, 21 juniors, SS sopho- 
mores, and 137 freshmen are taking the 

courses in Military Science and Tactics 

offered by the R.O.T.C. luit here at 

M.A.C. The- squadron, with ■ total of 
L'tiL' ini-ii shows a high representation 
bom each class, of the I wo classes taking 
tin- advanced courses, the juniors, with 

24.1] ol the men of their class in the 
Corps, have the highest average. The 
seniors have- 20.8£ of their men in the 
ranks. Ii is ex|>eetcd that there will lie- 
two additions before the vear is ended. 
Albertinl and Httyard, both of the- dasa 
of 1027 are expected to return to M.A.C. 

The sophomores have- a little- inoie- than 
half as many man taking the basic ionises 

as have the freshmen. Fewer of the- new 
min were bailed from military training 
this year because of physical disability. 

Apparently the men of the entering class 
are more physically lit than some of I he- 
men of former classes have been. On tin- 
whole- the- unit is prospering and is becom- 
ing more popular each vear. 



M.A.C. STOCK WINS 

AT EXPOSITION 



Percheron Horses, Milking Short- 
horn and llokt cin Cattle Carry Off 
Many Prizes. 



The Farm Dc|>artinciit of the Massa 
ehusetts Agricultural College- e xhibited 
seven Ben heron horses, ten milking 
Shorthorns, ten Holsteins, and one- 
Ayrshire, last week at the Eastern States 
Exposition. All animals except three 
which were exhibited were in the prize 
money, and all classes in which we e-.x- 
hibited, M.A.C. stock were in money 
eXCSfM two. In horses, eve-rv class was 
won except two and in these- classes 
.M.A.C. horses stood second. 

The Pen heron Show was rather small, 

the-re- being only seven exhibitors. The 

judging was done by W. II. I'e-w of Free- 
dom St, it ion, Ohio. Revelation, college- 
stallion, repeated his performance of last 
year, winning first prize- and grand 
champion. The six-year old mare, Dope's 
Primrose, itood second, Ix-ing defeated by 

a fine big mare, exhibited bv A. • ■. 
Soderlierg of OsCO, III. One <> f the bee) 

exhibits in the- three-year old class, 
Daffodil's Queen, was shown arh+>wi>n her 
elass. She is a mare bre-d on the College 

Farm, being sired by Bridgator, The two- 
year old class was probably the strongest 
I'crchcron class, there lx-ing eight entries. 
This class was won by Highland's Pride, 

exhibited by Pennsylvania State College. 

M.A.C.'s mare, Hay State l.ily was 

second, and Bay State Rose, fourth in 

the- same (lass. The filly, Hay Slate 
I avorell, was awarded the ribbon in the 
yearling (lass, and her sister, filly fosj 
Hay State Chocolate, won the blue- 
ribbon in her (lass. Hay State Lily and 
Bay State I- avorell Were awarded blue 

ribbons as produce ol Pentoila'i I avorite. 

In the milking Shorthorns there were 
eighteen exhibitors and competition was 
vcrv strong. This was the largest show of 
this breed ever held at the Eastern 
States. The age bull (lass had eighteen 
contributors, and the college owned bull, 

Flintstone Waterloo, placed sixth. Flint- 
Mom- Crusader, t yearling bull, landed in 
the same place iii a cfauw of equal sise. 

The bull Calf, Bay Sgate Waterloo, wis 
seventh iii a class e>f twenty-one. He 
showed at a disadvantage, being the 
youngest in the elass. Rhodors and Sue 

of lliiistom- were both placed in the 
ntOttey in a lar^e 'lass of mat lire cows. 

In the young cow ctass Gift's Rose was 

exhibited and also placed in tin- money. 
In the- two-year olds, Hay State Rhod.i. a 
daughter of llintstom- Waterloo and 

Rhodora, place second in a class of t arenty- 

two. Judge John O. Kowe. of Davis, Cal., 
(Continued on Pafte .1 



The- 1880 football season commences 
next Saturday OH Alumni lie-Id with a 
clash with Hates ( olh-ge in what should 
prove to be- a keen struggle. < 

Freshman eligibility rules are- not in 

vogue in the- Maine- institution, so the 
visitois will descend with a sepiad of tell 
letter -men, several ol whom have already 

had three year's experience. Among the 

veteran backs an the- Ray brothers and 

Errickson. 

The line-up will probably include Kiel 
at (enter, Nile-son and I'e-ables, guards; 
Foster and I liner, taekles; Palmer and 

Sedger, ends; Ei rkdmon, qsjaftoibaek; C. 

Ka\ and Haker at hall; and D. Rav, 
fullback. 

Ill Con tras t, the Agate eleven will in- 
clude only three vete-i.ins at the most. 
New faces will be in evidence in Ixitli 
the line and the b.u klield. CoSBpet it ion 
for all positions is strenuous, but a ten- 
tative lineup would probably include 
MeKittriek at right end; act ing captain 
Anisteiii, right ta< kle ; Cartwright or 
Kelton, light guard; Mills ot M, Alliste-r, 
((liter; Audeisein, left guard; Murdough, 
lell tackle; Rice- or Howie, left end; 
Cox or Ouinn at epiarter; llae-rtl and 
Johnson, halfbacks; and S|H-llinan, Mu- 
honev. Cook, or Coukos at fullback. 

I'he visitors, coached by Wiggin, a 

stiong adherent ot western football, will 
probablv I. inn. h an o|mii and an aeiial 
attack, but Aggie rooters an- looking 
forward to another "Little Reel Machine-" 
which will lie as game and as persistent 
in its attack as were its predecessors. 



Frosh and Senior 

Elections Announced 

Freshmen Elect Two Co-eds to 
Offices. Griffin to Lead Class of 1927. 



The class ot HMO started its e-areer as 
an organized unit when it held its first 
(lass meeting Wednesdav afternoon, Sept. 
lfi. The frosh met in the Arena after 
Assembly under the sii|>erv ision of several 
S-nate- hiciiiIm-is. Thcv < lected their first 
i lass officers by the time honored method 
of selecting the- best looking ones fremi 
among a group of < andidate-s. S e veral 
sophomores, assembled outside lor the 
Poster Rush, added a novel feature- to the- 

meeting by Introducing Henrietta the 

Farm mule into the Arena with the- 
suggestion that she In- elected president. 

Henrietta evidently did not care to join 
the (lass howe v er, and signified her die- 
approval by backing out. 

Continued on Page A) 

Maroon Key Informal 
To Follow C.A.C. Game 



Coe| D'Or Orchestra to Furnish Music 
for First Informal on October 9. 



The Maroon Key Society starts of the 

informal season with its informal after 
the C.A.C. lootb.tll game on October 0. 
Many couples .in- expected to start the 

season right when they "step out" to the 

tunes ot the well known Coq D'Or or- 
chestra, under the dire, (ion e>f "Eddie" 

Haertl. Mian Dietber will cater at l)ra|x-r 
Hall. The committee which is making 
preparations lor a big time, is composed 
ot the members ot tin Maroon Key 
headed by "Stan" Bailey. Tickets may 

be obtained t rom anv member ot t lie- 
Maroon Key Society. Those who e.\|»e-e-t 

lee go .oi aafced i" -■ ' same memb er e»f 
the- Maroon Kej <i i- possible in 

regard to chaperones. 

FKATERM'I V 
TELEPHONE DIRKCTORV 



Alpha ' ..iinma Rho 


720 


Alpha Sigma Phi 


K<77 


Kappa Epsilon 


K702 


Kappa ' .amma Phi 


K.W, 


Kappa Sinma 


170 


Lambda ( hi Alpha 


8380 


Phi Sigma Kappa 


880 


O. T. V 


888 


Sigma Phi Epsilon 


8888 


Theta Chi 


880 M 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29, 1926 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the M.i-.»ae liuse-tts 

Agricultural College, Puplwtaed every 
Wednesdaj by the students. 






BOARD OF EDITORS 



William l. Dot i "87 

Kl 1 SWOBTH Babnako '-'N 



Editor-ln < Iiki 
Managing Editor 



DEPAR1 Ml-M II" rORB 
l-.,lit,.r:..l Wi.iiam I. DO! i tl 

Atiiini, - rUscaa ». Clam 518 

Campus Ne«i B*K**1 L. S«KI KB 28 

w. GoasoM Huimn "-*■• 

William k Panorav "-'!» 

Fa.uity Nam BBWAM H. KlCHOI 

[attKolMfktc EdiUM Fkav(kv ( . Bki i i -'7 

Co- Kd News J0MWMIM1 tWMtCA 88 



m BIN ESS DEPARTMENT 
Chasus k. Clam '-'7 Bummm Mmm» 

Lawn li Warns** 87 Adverttaba Mana*w 

Jens E. Will 1 1 87 Circulation M.maKe-r 

DeuotM W. Lmbn "88 

Kdwin A. Wiiukk 81 

Habolo k. Awssli 89 

LlllWII A. (AKKl 111 81 

William A. Eoais "-"•» 



Subscription 12.00 pet year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts COLLEGIA*. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon M pceetWe. 



Entered us we onel-class matter at ttie A.nh.t-t 
Pom Oflke. Accented for mailing at ipee *•*.*■? 
of pottage provided Cor in sin ion 1 103, Act of Oc- 
tober, 1817. authorized Aiittusl 80, 1818, 



Mass Action 

PankM us for reiterating our college 
spirit idea. 1'ossiblv we can get some 
results by autosuggestion, at least M 
>li.ill COBM as near to it as we dare. There 
is no more important and no more fortui- 
tous time to start on such a campaign, I 
am referring now to an individual, personal 
campaign, than the present. Saturday is 
the day set for the first football game on 
the Mass. Aggie schedule. The mass 
meeting Friday night was designed pri- 
marily to lend a helping hand to those of 
us who are obstinate enough to discourage 
such childish things as enthusiasm and 
patriotism. The trouble with the program 
is that those men who need the effect of 
such a mass meeting most will not even 
come. We cannot send out engraved 
invitations to all of you but we ask you 
with all the more sincerity to expose 
yourself to such a meeting's Unign in- 
fluence. 

We ask you again to read some of our 
doubtful logic. First of all, what is the 
impelling force of college spirit. Well, to 
make a long story' short, it is mass support. 
If we are correct, then, the way to gain 
college spirit is by mass support. Let us 
pick on the football team. I am sure they 
will not mind. It will do us an immense 
amount of g(*xl, it will do the team more 
good, and it will do the college the BAOal 
good. Maybe you are ashamed ol our 
college in name, in reputation, in athletic 
prowess, or IB most anything, but we are 
here to tell you that your aspersion* art- 
all mental. The college is one of the best 
in the light of many Of its eotirses. The 
athletic teams are doing well and we are 

too blind to appreciate them. We have 

all been called lounge li/.mk How are 

we going to justify ourselves if we cannot 

evefl cheer. 

It seems to us that some of the student 
body get tired of hollering, yes. we mean 
it literally, a weakness of the lar\nx. 
Training brought Jack DetUfacy from a 
movie star to a psctido- lighter, at least. 
Can it be that some are BO dignified that 
cheering is beneath them? Possibly, al- 
though we have not seen all this dignity 
elsewhere on the campus. Maybe we are 
sclf-cnnseious; one of those PeOfNC who 
would SWOOCI at the sound of his own voire 
About twelve o'clock some nights, we 
begin to think that there are some excep- 
tions to this classification. Answer some 
of the advertisements in cheap magazines 
if you cannot get well any other way. 

Let us net the Aggie spirit. Make it SO 
much of you that you cannot help showing 
it anywhere and everywhere. The I 1 
Club helped greatly last year. Let M 

establish a win every game, go to every 

game, tight for every game club Every 

one get behind it. It it goes it will be the 
revival of one of the most vital traditions 
Massachusetts Aggie ever had. 

See you at the mass meeting next Fri- 
day night. 



anil think of it as one of those good old 
years. We are trying our best to Ik- OfMO 
minded on thU subject . as well as on more 

unpoetaaj oaaa. It is not too hard to 

like the idea Urban the freshman dresses 
neatly; but we do hate to see uieii chs- 
pl.iv inn their oldest and most untidv wear- 
ing apparel. Perhaps they may have the 
idea that wearing old clot lies is collegiate. 

It that u being collegiate, au prefer to 
be something dee. 

Let u> hark back for ■ moment to the 
days whin freshmen wore coats. I he 
purpose nl the COal rule was t0 start the 

neophytes ia habits of neat spperaance. 

Perhaps it did not always stem to accom- 
plish its end. but it seems to us that it 
worked wonders. At least then- were no 
freshmen in chapel without this much 
discussed article. Another advantage, of 
indubitable importance, is that no fresh- 
man w.'s caught in the middle of the 
winter in his shirt sleeves. 

There is little question in our mind 
that the relegation of this rule to t hi- 
st rap pile has no uncertain advantages. 
Imagine all the brilliant sweaters we 
should miss seeing if the frosh had to 

ke.-p them locked ap i" ■ dark closet or 

hung up on the wall. Moreover, it cer- 
tainly does help out the large number 
who cannot have a different suit every 
cloudy Thursday. We wore our military 
uniform an extra hour every other dav 
in order to save wear and tear on our 
precious coat. Some even went as far 
as to wear their "Monkey suits" all day. 
Thus there is little question about the 
virtue of this new freedom. 

The college has given the freshmen free- 
dom which has never been given to any 
other entering class. It is up to the 
frosh to do their part. Instead of merely 
saying thank you (we have assumed that 
they have I, the wearers of the green 
button might help the college out in a 
real manner by dressing like college men. 
In fact, members of all four classes might 
try the shoe on. A little mirror gazing is 
good exercise for the eyes. You have all 
heard of the "Inst dressed gal in town." 
Are we to be the "worst tlressed college 
in the country"? We aiwlogize for using 
up space on such a seemingly trivial 
subject, but in an attempt to save ourself 
an occulist's bill, we have resorted to this 
alternative. 



PERSONALS 



It is always easier to laugh at the ex- 
IHiisc ol others than at your own. These 
items are not derogatory but are printed 
in the same spirit as the remarks that 
may be heard among any group of under- 
graduates anywhere <>n the campus. It 

is hoped, UK), that there will bt an atom 
,,t news in each one which will be ot 
general interest. This column is still on 
trial; any comment* from our readers will 

be appreciated. 

P 

Traffic was slowed Up all afternoon 
along fraternity row last Thursday while 
the- members of Prof. Waugh's art course 
looked over the fraternity front yards 
and waited for inspiration. 

P 

There were forty ringside seats in 
Dutch Ansell's room last Thursday 
evening. Needless to say, it was as 
crowded as the space around the ring in 
Philadelphia. 



With The Faculty 

The wedding of Miss Joyce Willmot 
Butler, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen l.athrop Ibitler of Northampton, 
to Captain Dwight Hughes, Jr., Inited 
States Cavalry, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Dwight Hughes of Charleston, South 
Carolina, took place in the First Congn 
gational Church, Northampton, on Sept. 
11. A full military ceremony marked the 
wedding, the young couple passing under 
an arch of saliers, outside the church, 
formed by the officers taking part in the 
event, augmented by non-commissioned 
officers from the college. Major N. 
Butler Briscoe and Captain Daniel J. 
Keane were- two of the six ushers at the 

ceremony. 



AT THE ABBEY 



last Thursday evening at the Irst 
meeting of the Women's Student ( iov 
mint Association elections were held to 
fill the positions which were left vacant b) 
the Kir ,s who failed to return to coik-ge 
this fall. Dorothy L Leonard '2S wa* 
chosen secretary of the W.S.C..A. in p 
Of Susan Duftield ex'l'X who was elc 
last spring. Miss Duthcld had also b I 
chosen a iiiciiiImt of the Honor C ou n cil 
under the new ruling of that body, wh ■ i 
allows the women of the COltsSBj 

members on the board. Edith McCabe 2 

is to succeed Miss Dutheld and. with Ella 
Buckler '27 president of the W.S.C. V 
will serve on the Council for the- year. 

M 



c n 
wh 



CHANGES IN CUT 

Continued from Page 1) 
(.roup 1 and II will In- granted unlimited 
cuts for one term whereas Croup III is 
only an honorary group. 

Seniors, juniors, ami sophomores in 
Group 1 and II will »>e granted unlimited 
cuts, but they will, however, have to 
conform to a few regulations. These 
regulations are that BO cuts may be taken 
during the first week of the term, im- 
mediately before ami after holielays. from 
preannounced UUtttUM and te-sts or from 
Chapel and assembly exercises. These 
students will also be- held re-s|>e>nsil>lc lor 
the complete requirements of each course 
including the- final exaininat ion. 

It is the belief of the administration 
that the pr i vilege of unlimited cuts as a 
reward for high stantling should make- a 
marked improvement in the scholarship 
Of the College. It should be distinctly 
untlerstooel that this privilege is granted 
tor one term 00 the basis ol a student's 
average for the preceding term and that 
no student will be- granted unlimited cuts 
for more than one term if his work docs 
not place him in the first two groups. Ne> 
student who has a condition in any 
course will be included in anv ol t he- 
three groups. 



Lewie Whittaker's car has not been 
wrecked. We flon't know whether he can 
not buy gas t>r whether he started to 
sympathize with the rest of us. 
p 

Grace Waller, who transferred last 
year from the Connecticut College for 
Women to the class of 1988, has returned 

to Connecticut this fall. What will 
happen to psych classes unless an under- 
study appears? 

P 

Jack Amatt says he gins home evev 
we-e-k-end to work. One suspects that he 

docs not earn Bumey for all of his activities. 
P 

Appointing Be-ssie- Smith one of the- 
proctors at the Abbey was one- way of 
making her keep epiiet. 

P 

Eddie Hacrtl has added ■ ukelele to 
his list of accomplishments. His "brothers" 
wish he would stick to the traps. 

P 

Mini l-ontaine has returned from a 
week's vacation in the Infirmary. 

P 

Itchie Burgess and Freddie Thayer are 
competing for manager of baseball. This 
looks ho|H-ful U-eause emly one man has 
survived the spring grind in the past two 

years. 

P 



Mr. Clayton L. Farrar has come- to the 
collage to till the ixisition left vacant by 
the resignation of Prof. Morton H. 
Cassidy. Mr. Farrar is a graduate of the 
Kansas State College and he is an experi- 
enced beekeeper. He has recently been 
with Dr. Tanquary, who has an apiary in 
North Dakota. The position which Mr. 
Farrar now holds has been changed from 
Assistant Professor of Beekeeping to that 
of instructor in Kntoniology ami Bee- 
keeping. 

Professor Cassidy resigned because of 
ill health, ami he has gone ftir that same 
reason to the Hawaiian Islands. He is 
now teaching science in the Kanawaena 
School at Kealakekua, Hawaii. 



Another of the offices left vacant was 
that of Treasurer of the House. Elisabeth 
Moray "88 was elected to fill this posit on 
in place of Truth Heminway ex'2S, win. 
transfered to the North Adam* Normal 
School this fall. 

M 



On Julv 1 1th. Miss Hazel L. White, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred N. 
White, aa* married to Prof. Marshall 0. 
Lanphear at the bride's home in Worces- 
ter. Pro' ssor Lanphear is Assistant Pro- 
lessor of Agronomy and graeluated from 
the college with the class of 'IS. Mrs. 
lanphear has been an assistant in the 
Dining Hall for several years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lanphear are now living at the 
home of Prof. Fred C. Sears on Mt. 
Pleasant. 



Bessie M. Smith '20 is to be Gent I 
Manager of the Women's Athletic Asso. i- 
ation for this year. She was manager of 
track last year and is well q u a lified (or 

the responsible |>e>sition. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 



Abolition of active football c a pt a in s was 
affected by the Executive ( onimittee of 
the Student Body at Stanford University. 
Hereafter the jxisition will be honorarv 
and only awarded at the end of the season . 
An active field captain will be apfXXnted 
for each contest by the coache -. 

The initiative for this move e ame from 
the coaches. They favor the plan lice 
it will give them more freedom in the- 
selection of men to play in each partie u'.n 
game. 



Mr. John S. Bailey, Investigator in 
Pomology, has been granted a year's 
leave of absence in order that he may 
take graduate wtirk at Cornell Cniversity. 



Betty Pomeroy '2« and Chet Kicker 
'24 were married in Springfield last 
Wednesday. Another score for the Abbey 

Matrimonial Bureau. 

P 

Ruth Faulk was the victim of an "un- 
fortunate" accident last Sunelay. Moral: 
don't chin rails em Sunday. 
P 

The first hundred cracks are the 
hardest. At last the Abbey is rejoicing 

in an honest -to-gexdness sidewalk. 



Mr. Gerald M. C.illigan, Investigator 
in Chemistry, who has been in the em- 
ployment of the Experiment Station for 
two years has accepted a position as re- 
search chemist at the Delaware Experi- 
ment Station, Newark, New Jersey. 



Professor Ashley is away this term on 
account of illness. His work is being 
divided between several members of the 
faculty. 



Dr. Clarence E. Cordon has been 
selected to be acting nead of the Division 
of Science during the time which Dr. 
Female! plans to be away. 



CANDIDATES REPORT 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

anel Richards, catchers: Ku/meski, pitcher 
Barnard and Robertson, outfielders; and 
R. Nash and Tompkins, infielders. 
Several freshmen have also appeared, 
prominent among whom are- Hall and 
Tudryii, two promising hurlcrs. 

An inere-ase- in the size of the pitching 
statf should materially aid the 1927 Aggie- 
nine, whkh will be- com posed principally 
of veterans. 



Coats 

We undergraduates cannot get accus- 
tomed to seeing freshman caps and bright 

sweaters or shirt sle eve* <m the ante 

person. How strange it must be- tor the- 
alumni who come back to the campus 
from time to lime! Already we have 
begun tO look back tO our freshman vc-ar 



WORK ON INDEX TO BECIN 

(Continued from Pufte I 

Kidder. Art Editor; Frames Thompson, 
Photographic- Editor. George B. Yoctsch, 
Statistics Editor; Robert I., box, Adver- 
tising Manager; and George S. Tulloch 
as Sales Manager. 



M.A.C. TEAMS COMPETE 
(Continued from Page 1) 

as individuals the college has a lot to In- 
proud of, due to the fact that Miss Ella 
Buckler was high individual out of thirty 

competing in the Fat Stock cosrtest. This 

is the first time such an honor has ever 
been won by a woman contestant. In 
placing first, Miss Buckler- won a S40 
prize and in the same contest Miss South- 
Kate- won a prize of 818J8 and Baum- 
gartner a prize of *H>. In Dairy Cattle. 
Kenneth Milligan was high individual in 
judging Ayrshire cattle and received a 
medal significant of this fact from the 
Ayrshire Breeders' Association. The 
team consisting of Milligan. Foley and 
C. Parsons was high team in judging 
Ayrshire Cattle. 

The Dairy Products team, consisting 
of Foley, Milligan and C. Parsons tied for 
first place with Penn. State in the judging 
of Ice Cream. In the individual standing. 
Fohsy ranked highest of the men on t he- 
team with fourth place in the judging of 
all dairy products. 

No prize money was awarded in the 
Dairy Products contest. The money 
available for this purpose was prorated 
to the various contestants Ofl the basis 
of the mile-s travelled in order to partici- 
pate it' the contest. 



Captain Daniel J. Keane- has In-en 
transferred to the Fourth Cavalry. Fori 
D. A. Russell. Wyoming. No replacement 
officer has been detailed yet. 



Dr. G. Chester Crampton collected 
during part of the summer in Cuba and 
Jamaica anel later in Canada and Maine 



Dr. Charles P. Alexander 'spent a short 
vacation in Maine. 



Professors William K. Cole and Ralph 
A. Van Meter went with an excursion 
party, made up mostly of fruit growers. 
to Oregon, Washington, and other fruit 
growing sections of the northwest. 



Prof. Fred C. Sears visiteel several 
fruit growing regions as well as various 
points of interest in Nova Scotia this 
summer. 



A student entering the University of 
California must be- able to spe-ll correctly 
800 given words. 



But When Oberlin considers the plight 
Of the CO-eds of the University of Cali- 
fornia, where there are 5,000 girls to l.(MH) 
men. she may take heart. The "Inter- 
eolle-giate Worhl" reports the girls as 
saving. "We are looking for new talent." 
Indeed, the shortage of men has been so 
acute at this school that Cniversity of 
Southern California undergraduates have 
been drafted as escorts for the poor girls. 



Dr. Jacob K. Shaw conducted a school 
for nurserymen, in the nursery identi- 
fication Of fruit trees, at Shenandoah. Ia. 



Prof. Frank A. Waugh was with the 
United States Forestry Service during 
the- summer, in which time he traveled 
through the national forests of the 
southern Appalachian Mountains. 



What Is 

A Life 
Underwriter? 

One who execute* and delivers 
a life insurance policy. In 
other word*, s person whose 
business It is to offer the 
known benefits of life insur- 
ance to individuals, to corpor- 
ations, to partnerships, etc. 

But further, the life under* 
writer is one who must con- 
vince those clients of the 
benefits offered. Thi* means 
stimulating contact with hu« 
man character, and with large 
affair*. Some underwriters 
prefer the game of character 
and deal mainly with indi- 
viduals. Others prefer affairs; 
to them is open the great field 
of business insurance. 

Furthermore, the business of 
life underwriting pays highly 
for initiative and ability. 

And still more, the life under- 
writer offers to his client a 
commodity which has no risk 
in it, does not deteriorate, and 
adds no burden of mental 
worry. The life underwriter 
sells absolute security, the 
foundation of serenltyof mind. 

It is worth while to think 
these things over now and to 
remember them when, per- 
haps, you find yourself wrong- 
ly placed in whatever business 
you may have chosen. 

You can obtain con/iaenrial in- 
formation from the Inquiry 
Bureau, John Hancock M utual 
Life Insurance Co., 197 Clar- 
endon St., Boston, Mass. 



Professors Frank Prentice Kami and 
Edgar L. Ashley went abroad this summer. 
Professse.r Rand spent the summer in 
England, principally at Stratford-on- Avon. 
Professor Ashley spent mtist of his time 
in Switzerland. 



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M.A.C. STOCK WINS 

Conllnurit from I'tiUr I 

had her ia iir*t place (or ■ long time, but 
before the ribbon* were' lieil *lie w.is 
forced t < » ^ive way i<> .1 heifei from lis* 
Farms, Alton. V Y. In the junior yeari* 
inn class, three heifers »«re exhibited, 
Baj State Queen, t/inning fifth, and 1 . 1 1 1 > 
Batchelder, placing >i\th. There were 
twent) five contender* in the heifei class. 
I In college exhiliite-el heifer, Baj State 
Blytheaome, ■ daughter ol Lad) Blythe 
soma, the United States three year old 
milk champion, eras awarded fifty place. 
In the K r °up daases, the yearling herd 
placed second. A pah of calves were 
awarded lonrth place, and i\u- mi of 
Klinisieine Waterloo was awarded fifth 

plaee in a class of sixlee-n entires. 

The llolsteins WCTC iilil^ecl li\ \\il 
Hanson of Savage, Minn. The llolstein 
Show was pronounced l>> main a- the 
Ust quality show ever exhibited in the 

United Slates. There- were thnt\ eight 

exhibitors from all over the country. In 
the yearling dull class. Sir Star laka 
Superior, of the college stock, landed in 

HVOBth place-. In the- font \ear olil class. 

Beth Blossom Ku|H'rt was awa rd e d fourth 
ribbon, and Faync Kuinrt Countess, 

sixth. This heifer did not make- as ^ihmI 
a showing as -he did the previous w.u 
when she was awarded dlue riddon in the 

two-year old class. The reason lor her 
iMK>r showing was the fad thai she was 
producing heavily last December. Prob- 
ably the' most creditable showing ia the 

whole show was made- dv her daughter, 
Bay State (HI, inther Pietje Countess. 



SIh w.is shown in the lie ilei class in which 

there were torn six entries. s '» finally 
finished second, being defeated d\ ■ call 
shown l>\ 1 In Pabbs I lolstein Farm*. 

Only one Ayrshire •ras shown by the 
College, a soling dull recently. He was 

expel led to stand well up l*. 'lis < lass, I mt 
lor seme unknown reason In tailed to 

meet with the approval ol the judge. 
However, several otters were made to 

purchase' the dull dv Other dreedcis. 

Mr. Sagendorl kindl) offered t" exhibit 

the dull In tin National Dairy Show, 

where be will be shown in October. 
Ringleader, a dull formerly owned by 
the college, and now the property ol Mi 
Sagendorf, has made a verj creditable 
showing in the laiis 1 ,, aau he das been 

the first prize scnioi and grand prize at 

the New York m<\ Maryland State Fain. 

He was second at the Scsipiieenteimial 

Exposition. 

KROSH AND SENIOR ELECTIONS 

( onlintie'tl from I'liftr I 

Election* to the various office* were as 

follow*; Kenneth \\ . Hunt, president; 

Eric Singleton, vice president; Miss I n< \ 
A Grunwaldt, secretary, Miss Rachel 
At wood, treasurer; Ge or ge W. Noble, 

captain, and Raymond S. Mann, set 
He-.uil at ai ins. 

At .1 meeting <>t the class ol l!»27 held 
Thursdaj afternoon the following officer* 

were eleiUel: Raymond G. Griffin, presi 

dent; Kdwin |. I l.n-n I, vice- p r es id e n t ; 
Miss Etta M. Buckler, secretary; Robert 

( \iues, treasurer; William < .. Amstein, 

captain; and lewis II. Black, sergeant at 

.11 His 



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•14 

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tlveryone gets in the rough 
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Circular 822 explains it. 
Write for copy. 

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BEHIND THE FRONT" 
The story of a roufth-neck 
and a Hap who fouflht the 
whole <;erman army for a 
ftlrl Mary Brian with Ray- 
mond llatton and Wallace 
lieery, the laughable musk 
eleers of "Adventure." 
New* Fable* Comedy 



Friday 



4.45. K.iO 



Saturday 

Ml 

• 45 8.SS 



Rudolph Valentino & Aft 

Ayre»ln"THF. SIIF.IK 

An amazing ph<itoplay 
which shows you how an 
Arab chief ma ken love to a 
beautiful KnUlUh girl he ban 
captured. A thousand wild 
mounted Hedouins with 
lonii rifles and flowing robe* 
ohey hln slightest wish. She 
sees the slave-brides dance 
beneath the great canopy 
for his sultanic pleasure. 
ShsU to become one of then, 
unless faterulesolher-wise. 
That Is the plot of It. 
News 2 Reel Comedy 

Raymond (•rlfnth in pa 
"WET PAINT." Ray, dis- 
appointed In hue. sets out 
to marry the first girl he 
meets — and wow ! tall ones, 
thin ones, fat ones, lean 
ones, short ones, broad ones 
In between ones. He meets 
"em all In "Wet Taint." 
Lavish, laughlsh him enter- 
tainment for everyone. 
Newt Comedy 



ATHLETIC MEET won 

Continued from Page I 
work and team work of OUT EMM, r«t»€f 

d.aii by individual play. The scores 

Were; M.A.C. 70, Yale 66, Harvard 80, 

and Norwich 80. 

because <>t the difference in the number 
of men on the lour teams, Harvard and 
Norwich, earl, bavin* between loriy-hve 

and fifty man, and M.A( and Vale, 
numbering about twenty each, were 
grouped together. Neither Harvard or 
Norwich could enter one man ... more 

than one event. The other two team 
could enter I man in as many events M 
they saw fit. While MAC did not take 
fesl place in any event except the short 

put, a judicious entering of the competl- 
ton made it poaaiWe far in to take many 

second and third place. I or example, 
Harvard'* man won first place in the 
half-mile. Their man was Waters, who 
ran in the Olympic game*, 0J eouise, 
Harvard WOO the principal award, but 

M.A.t . took second place. Every Aggie 

man entered in sonic event. 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the beat in everything 



sVOsvTlNG GOODS 
SPORTING GOODS 
SPORTING GOODS 
SPOUTING GOODS 



SPORTING com,,, 
sportim; (.oods 
S PO R TING COOOl 
SPORTING GOOOi 



THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



WELCOME TO AGGIE STUDENTS! 

We have already in stock the most up-t» 

date Oxfords for < ollege wear, also we have 
established a shoe repftirins deparUBenl 

Mctlofl with our ragMM BBSS ItOCS 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



G. Edward Fisher 



We, too, have 

JUST RETURNED 

(from a buying trip) 

Gifts 

Greeting Cards 

Articles for your Room 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 



DRURY'S BAKERY 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

M. A. C. Stationery 

Fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

AMHERST 



MAIN STREET 



The place where nearly all the college 
men trade. Styles that have been se- 
lected with the first thought of the exact- 
ing taste of College men. 



u 



SEE OUR DISPLAY OF 

BOSTONIANS" 




SLICKERS 

Yellow or Olive - - $5.50 
Black with buckles - 600 

Laundry Cases $1.75 to 2.25 

Black all wool sweaters 

$9 and $10 

If you need a suit this Fall drop in and 
look them over. Real values at $25 = $40 




Camels add the charm of living 



Blue Twill Suits at 



$40.00 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



WHETHER through the tasks of 
every day, or in life's moments of 
crisis and great reward, the com- 
fort and understanding of Camel 
cheers us on our way. For no other 
cigarette was ever so friendly, so 
loyal as Camel. The unfathomed 
goodness, the deep underlying 
quality of Camel tobaccos is 
ever-dependable . 

The world's largest tobacco or- 
ganization buys the best of every- 
thing for Camels. The choicest 
Turkish and Domestic tobaccos 



grown. The kind of blending that 
only such a group of experts could 
give. Regardless of what you are 
willing to pay, there is no other 
cigarette like Camel; there can be 
no better cigarette made than 
Camels. Camels never tire the 
taste, no matter how indefatigably 
you smoke them, never leave a 
cigaretty after-taste. 

If you don't yet know Camel 
enjoyment, just sample the most 
exquisite fragrance that ever came 
from a cigarette. Have a Camel! 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



© 1929 




Men Who Want ^ ^©^ es ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ h a ^^ man , s wardrobe _ 

Know that it pays to rely on us. . -, 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUL 1 




iiafi0arijit0rtt0 ffinlbfltatt 



XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 1926 



Number 3 



Freshmen Win Decisive 

Victory in Rope Pull 

Urge Crowd Watches Sophomores Go Through Pond As Frosh 

Triumph Easily 



It baa been three yean lince toe Iran- 

waters «>i the Aggie l> "'" 1 ll,iV '' l "''" 

irbed in the Mime way in wliirli they 

last Thursday afternoon, when Bitty 

-Jinn sophonaorea were dragged ig- 
througfa the pond by the ferreetttibte 
,t an equal number of freehmeii. 

,., , aiioti was the annual freshman- 
araorc si\ty-man roi*- pull, one of 
ieat known d Aggie traditions, which 
r tails t.. aroute widespread interest, 
.1,. the College as well as in the 

..,„ bady, The struggle usually lakes 

. oa the Saturday following the apeu- 

,1 college, but this year it wa- poal 

poned in hope that there would SOBO be 

„ 11 ,re water in the pond. This hope taile.l 
,,,,-riali/.-, however, and it wu- decided 

t0 have the event take |»la. * ThundU) 
BOOB, September M). 
! he contest was scheduled for 4 P- •"•• 
I b« appointed hour found the opposing 

clartBi i„ position, the (reshmen on the 

Mdeot the pond; and the sophomores 

opposite, A large number of ■pectatora 

were present, lining the banks ol the pond 

CTOWtling against the rope- which 

r^ted them from the contestants, 

. a line of automobiles was parked on 

-idcof the roped -oft area-. The Mart 

struggle wa> delayed for lome 

m i, jt« while the member- of the oppos- 
ing tassei arranged themselves along the 

and dug in their heels. Ippcrclass 

,,„.„ passed up and down the lines, the 

n on the freshman side, the lenionj 

the -o|ihomores, pnesi ng out resin, 

I ,ug final irords of encouragenient 

.,„,.. Then the phnol cracted, tod 

the battle was underway. 

I of the Bret mcrrnfH or 1*0 the rope 

| bach and forth, sometime- in one 
ction and sometimes in the other, 
r moving more than a few fi 

however, il WO* •«■ « ,u " *■ 

. ,U when t he freshmen had I he ad\ au- 

aere becoming more frequesM and of 
rt duration, and soon becanM ■ 

iphant and uninterrupted man h. 

,rted, there was no halting them. 

tad, ->ne by one, the sophomore*, pulling 

.inly but in vain, were dragged n : 
til.lv down the bank and through the mud 

water of the pond, to be greeted on 

the ->ther side by the jeer, of then one- 
tin ■ rivals, the juniors. 

(.Continued on Pafte 4 

New Officer for 

R. O. T. C. Unit 



MASS MEETING 

DRAWS LARGE CROWD 

Much Enthusiasm Manifested as 
Aggie Supporters Watch lliuili Fire. 

A large enthusiastic gathering oi under- 

graduate- and friend- of the College 
turned out for the first mass meeting of 

the year la>t Fridaj evening at the Target 
Pit. The parade, which left the o.T.Y. 
fraternity bouse at <*>.4."> p. m., was headed 

b\ "Dutch" Ansell and a 14-pfeOB band 

and iijxm reaching the campus it had 
gathered over .'i(K) loyal supporters, 

When the parade reached the pit, the 

huge pile of wood which had been gathered 

by the freshmen under the leadership of 
George YV. Noble, class captain, hla/cd 
forth with such intense beat that the 
supporters were forced to recede. 

Dean William I.. Machmer opened the 

program by urging the student body to 

siip|>ort all the various activities of the 

College whethei they be athletic or .t< a 

demic. Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey spoke on 
the sympathy and praise which is due 
"Kid" Gore for his entailing efforts and 
earnest endeavors. "Spike" M alley dealt 
with the potentialities <>i the team and 

was followed by Captain Amstein who 

rep r e sen ted the team. "Dick" Muller 

and "Pop" t I. ii k were the la-t speakers, 
The meeting was brought to a ctost bj 
singing "Alma Mater". 



SCHEDULE OF PICTURES 
FOR 1«»2S INDEX 
Sunday, October 10 
9.30 M.A.t '.( .A. 
9.45 YW.C.A. 
10.00— Delta Phi Gamma 

10.16- <'.irls' (dee Club 

10.30 Women's Student < kn t, 

I0.4.-V Collegian 

11.00— Senate 

11.15 I fonor Council 

11.30- Adelphia 

1 1 . 15 Maroon Kej 
12.00 Theta Chi 

11'. 15 Alpha ( '..iiiinia Rho 



(apt. Sumner Succeeds Capt. Daniel 
J. Keane in Military Department. 

pt. Edwfa M. Sumner. 1 .S.A., 

(D.O.L.), is to take the place of Capt. 

1 J. Keane. C.S.A., D.O.I. . who 

been sent to Fort D. A. Russell, 

Mine, Wyoming. Capt. Sumner has 

i he Adjutant of the Nt Cavalry at 

Marfa, Texas, the old regiment of Major 

Kol be and Major Briscoe. Capt. Sumner 

»at horn in this state and was formerly 

niber Of the Massachusetts National 

I. He is a graduate of the Fort 

' avalrv School. 



Index Pictures 

Now Being Taken 

Orders for Croup Pictures Sill Woon 
Be Called For. 



COLLEGIAN BOARD 
ANNOUNCES CHANGES 

Rearrangement of Fditorial Hoard 
Made Necessary as Paper Oets Under 
Way. 



Although it is not cuslomaiy to make 
a change In the editorial board of the 
( 'ollegian at the beginning of the fall 
term, nevertheless a partial reorganiza- 
tion has been deemed necessary because 
of the present condition-. Willi. un L. 
Dole J7, who was elected editor-in < hit I 
last spring but was ineligible tO hold the 
position because of his vanity baseball 
managership, has now taken up his duties 
and will act in this capacity for the re- 
mainder of his term ol office. 

Ellsworth Barnard '- >s > has automat ically 

beco m e managing editor as ■ result of 
the policy which S/as adopted last spring, 
lie will hold lbi> position for the remainder 
of the term, at which time Harold K. 
(lark '28 will take over the office. 

< hiring tO the resignation ol I.. Kockwell 

Smith, Jr. '-H, it has btea Beceaaar) to 

alter the athletic and (.iinpus depart- 
ments somewhat. W. Cordon Hunter ':_".» 

who has served in the campus department 

for the past two terms, has been trail 
ferred to the athletic department, when 
he will assist Harold Clark '28, who has 
been elected head of that department. 

Ernest I.. Sprntw '38 will continue as 

OSSMsaaSSSl on l'.ni>- 2) 



Croup pictures foi the IMS hi'l<\ are 
now in the process of preparation, as are 
aim photographs of members of the junior 

i la— . A representative of the 1 mlrx Board 

will call at the various fraternity houses 
ill the near future to -ecure orders for 

group pictures. 

Schedules tor junior individuals will be 
|X)sted in prominent places, and pictures 
will be taken on Monday, Tuesday and 
(Continued on Page i) 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR 

FRESHMAN TEAM ANNOUNCED 

Phil Couhig's Proteges to Meet Some 
Stiff Opposition. 

A tentative schedule tor the Ireshman 
football team has been arranged which, 
although it calls for few games, will give 
the yearling aggregation plenty of chain • - 
to prove it- worth. The schedule is as 
follow-: 

Oct. 12 — Amherst freshmen, there. 
27— Two- Year. 

Nov. 3 — Williston, there. 

10 — Sophomores (numeral game/. 

Aggie Revue 

To Be Movie 



Cross Country Team 

Has Many Veterans 

Time Trials Show Improvement Over 
East Year. Victory Over Tufts 

Expected. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



nous <ue the noods in their latest 

gold and crimson . 

• ' our full-leaved u-illtnvs are in 

their freshest green. 

a kindly autumn, so w.ernUdly 

dealing 

Vitk the growths of summer. I natf 

vet have seen." 

— Hrvant 



Ihursday 

nibly: Rev. J. B. Parry ol Hope 

* ongregational Church, Spr'fiekf. 

Friday 

Saturday 

-it \ football: Conn. Aggies at 

Vlumni Field. 

v cross country: Tufts, hen. 
Maroon Key Informal. 
Tuesday 
Holiday: Columbus Day. 
reshman football: Two-Near. 



Time trials for the M.A.I , harriers, 
which man held last Saturday, sho we d 
onnaidernbte improvement ovm those 

held la-t tall. Five of the first nine men 

bettered their mark- established a year 

■go, and will probably run again-t the 
TuftS team which inaugurates the mmsoii 
hen- 0O Sat anlay. 

"The order in which the com p et itors for 
I he Aggie BOUnd finished according to I la- 
trials w.i-^ as follow-: Ileum bei r\ , Swan, 
Nottebaert, biron. Preston. Crooks. Roper 

fiemeyer, Forest, TonrteUot, Panae and 

ConneB. Bailey and Snell have not yet 

been tested. 

The M.A.C. cross country team will he 
a veteran one, and should overcome Tufts, 
although the visitors will have a star 
p el fo rmer in Captain Lester. 

EXTENSION WORKER DIES 

IN AUTO ACCIDENT 



Local Color Will Be 
Leading Actors Chosen. 



Introduced. 



In continuance of the policy of making 

the Aggie Revue something different each 

year, it has been decided to present it 

thi- fall in the form of a real b onCSt -tO 
goodness movie. Director \ erbeck of the 

Short Course- has very kindly consented 
to lend for this purpose ihe camera and 
other necessary apparatus belonging to 

hi- departments. The scenario, written 
by Prof. Frank P. Rand and Neil C. 
Kohinson. is the story of a farm lioy who 
goes tO an agricultural college, and deals 
with his experiences and problems in his 
attempt tO make good. It is prop., 
introduce considerable local color into the 
picture, with the possible end in view of 
using it to make M.A.C. better known to 

people throughout the state. 
Many of the final detail- of the work 

have not been arranged, but the Students 
who have been selected to a< t the leading 
part- .ire Miriam Huss '29, Neil C. 
Robinson 'J7. and Robert L. Fox '28, all 
of whom have seen service in the Roister 

Dcastera. 



Miss Knight Had Been Clothing 
Specialist in M.A.C. Extension Ser- 
vice. 



\Ii-s Bertha Knight, clothing specialist 
in the M.A.C. Fxten.ion Service was 
killed Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 28, with 

two other women in an automobile SO i 
dent at the grade c ro ss ing in West Marti 

-table. 

Mi-- Knight ana born August 26, lxxd. 

She wa> a graduate ol tin- I'niversity ot 

Chicago and had been employed as a 

clothing Specialist in South Dakota, 
Iowa, and Maryland. She came tO \m 
her-t a year ago to take the position 
which she occupied at the time of her 

death. 

Mr. Ralph W. Redman and Mi>- M.r. 

Foley of the Extension Service identified 
the body. 



Agates Lose to Bates 

in Opening Contest 



"Little (ireen Team" loses Hard I uck GfsflM by 2-0 Score. 
Sophomores Show Up in Clash with Bates' Veteran Aggregation 



Frosh Eleven 
Wins First Game 

Knecland, Yearling Quarterback, 
Stars in l.*-0 Win Over Northampton. 



The freshman eleven defeated North 
ampton High by a score of 18-0 here 
Wednesday in the opening fame of the 

ICaiOn for both teams. The frosh made an 
auspicious stait ami rolled up two touch- 
down- and one extia |H>int ill the carlv 
part of the game. Knecland caught a 
punt in the fust quarter and ran seveat) 
yards for a touchdown, but failed in his 

try for |M>int. Soon after, Northampton 

was pushed back to it- own god line and 
Knecland .arried the ball aero.— . He 
made the extra |M»int bv a dropkick. The 
neophytes seemed unable to keep up I he 
pace for the rest of the game and the 
ball see sawed back and forth on the held 
with the frosh making several tumbles 
and Northampton making g<»od gains 

through the line. Salvo of Northampton 

played a good game but, although he 
proved a hard man to slop, wa- unable 

to score. 

The lineup: 

Freshmen Northampton 

C.oldberg.le W, Young 

Warren, Drew, It 

it, Hanks, l'ogg, badger 

Crane, bj rg, Parrel, Donahue, Artman 



Morawski, c 

NcImiii, rg 

Mann, Adams, rt 
< riandomenico, re 
Knecland, <|l» 

l.llert, Ihb 
bond, (lib 

Burbank, Babaon, lb 



c, Smith 

Ig, Breor 

It, Don !,■ 

I. , ( in ut i. Keefe 

qb, Salvo, Banner 

rhb, Sullivan 
Ihb, Saner 
lb, Allen 



Store: M.A.C. !• reshmen 13. 

Touchdowns: Knecland 'J. Goal after 
touchdown, Kneehuid. Referee, "Red" 

Ball. I mpire, Salman. Head line-man. 

Hanson. Time, two 12 and two 10 minute 
periods. 

Aggie Ready for 

Clash With C.A.C. 

Heavy Nutmeg learn Kxpected to 
Prove a Tough Assignment for Maroon 
and While. 



The I mm Aggie eleven cornea to Mam, 

Aggie this Saturday lor a game which 
will serve as a better indie. itoi ol the 
relative merits of the two team- than 
comparative scores can give. 1 he Nul meg 
Aggie-, coached by "Dolly" Dole, M.A.t . 
I."», outplayed We-levan, U lo I), la I 

Saturday, md diepfayed a succ es s f ul 

overhead attack. They alaO l»'.i-t a 
particularly heavy back-field, "Top'' 
Williams, fullback, tipping the Umi ii at 
200 pounds. 

The M.A.c. outfit bus benefit e d by its 

struggle with Hales, and with a more 
<onsi-t.nt oil tackle offensive, should 
prove a match lor the visitor-. The 
potential bai kfield ability and excellent 
defensive work shown last Saturday, il 

matched by equal offensive work on the 

part of the forwards, will make an un- 
beatable combination. 



OPPONENTS SCORKS 

Conn. Aggie 13, Wesleyaii <x» 

William- 32, Middlebury II 
Amherst 7, Princeton 14 
Springfield 0, Manhattan '■', 
Tufts 20, Lowell Textile 



ACADEMICS BOARD 

ISSUES STATEMENT 

Oives Financial Standing of All 
Academic Activities of M.A.C. 

The Academic Activities board issues 

the following financial Statement tor the 
college year of 1886-26: 

ISCI.I SIVI 



Reetpli 

( uti on tend agsj ;,i 
Student !'•■ i-'"-'' 00 



Other i ,i'i7.m«i 



i>i i. 

( olli-m.in |13t 

Debating 

J mining teami '-''>- 80 

li.a.x H 00 

ninu 1-1 71. 
General enpenaei 516. IS 

Other dWti '• - 

gshuwe 1387.00 



An inexperienced, but hard-fighting 

M.A.t . eleven lo-t it- lir-t game of the 

■n to bate- i.v a a ore of to 2 on 
Alumni field Inst Saturday. The highly- 
heralded Bobi ii attai i was ii wrrated, 
lour successive first down in the third 
peiiod iii, uking iheonlv consistent ground- 
gaining l>\ the visitors. I he lone aoora 
came during the first (en minutes of play 
when Johnson, who bad been (oread h\ ■ 

penalt) to drop bach of the goal line lo 
kick, could not handle a low pa — , and 

w.:s tackled on the s|>oi. 

l he Agates displayed then graatesf 
ground-gaining ability In ■ clever forward 

paM attack which netted two mh 
downs and loii-ideiable vantage in both 

the second and fourth quarters, In addi- 
tion, the team completelj smothered 
every attempt at as rial piaj b) bates, 

S/hicfa had been e\|M<led to r«ly on an 

open offensive, 

A \vell-place«l piini which rolled out- 
side on the sil inch mark in the initial 

session compelled Johnson to punt from 

behind the <• stri|>c again, but bales 

fumbled, .t\u\ Cartwright recovered fur 

Aggie. Johnson and Cook then proceeded 
lo add two In -t doWM through the line. 

Not until the second quarter did Bates 
■ucceed in securing a first down, but the 
Agates reciprocated with two, the first 
dm to interference on an attempted 

pa-s, and the second on a completed IOT> 

ward. Amu h< i throw wa- intercepted by 
D. Ray, howe ver, and the visitoi- bald 

(he ball at half time. 

file Bohoata made a de-|xiale bid lor 
a lOOre m the next period, D- Kav and 
C. Ray lealuiing the attack, bill tailed 
becaUeeol i |x-naltv when on the HI vanl 
line. A long forward which was grounded 
in lie- end zone STBS their final try loi a 

tally. 

W il Ii -i\ minutes of the Rami- remain 
the Aggie stands were elt.tiiliid bv ail 
adv am e ol ."..", \ aids which the home learn 
made bv viilue ol two long passe- liom 

Johnson to riaartl, which placed the oval 

on Hale-,' II yard mark. Two phm 
tailed lo gain thrOUgS 01 aioimd the line, 

and Cartwright tried h>r a field goal, but 

I lit- ball went wide ol the mark. 

Sensational i>lav eras not evident, but 
Captain Amstein al tackle, and Mill- at 

Center stood out in the line, while Cook 
ami Johnson among the back- made the 

moat gains. • ok ahw did creditable work 

in his first contest SJ Aggie signal barker. 

I he Kav brot h ers .m^ While featured lor 

bales. I In lineup. 

Mass. Aggie Rates 

\l< Kitirii k.re le. Palmer, Peck 

Anderson, rt It, rimer, Black, Cofbura 

l«, Snell, Neilson 

c, Eld 

rg, Townsend, Peebles 

rt, Wood, foster 

re, Ledger 

qb, f.rickson 

Ihb, C. Kay 



Murdough,rg 
Mills, c 
Cartwright, Ig 

\mstein, It 

Rice, Howie, le 

Cox, Tub-, M.ihoney, i|b 

Quinn, Haertl, rhb 



Johnson, Ihb rhb, White. Maker 

Cook, II, lb, D. Kay 

Sore bate- _', M.A.C. S.dely— 

Johnson. Referee P. K. Car p e n t e r. 
Umpire Johnson. Linesman — J. I-. 
Duftey. Time two twelve and two 
fifteen minute periods. 



■ 



i 



$x7*s 10 


S-^7 


CLAMtriKO 




Coll«aliin 




gnae n m 




■j'.'i i 


, M 


BJM0 .".7 


1 Vt .'.7 


Men'* Musical Clutm 




aats ir. Das' 


SI 2 ."rt 


2 Vi I> 





NOTICES 

There will Ik- i M .noon Key ln- 
lormal on >at urdav alt<-i noon, < »( tober 
Bj following the football game with 

Connecticut A^gie. Everyone ia urged 
to get tickets from some member of 
the Maroon Key Society as -oon as 
possible. The price ol admission will 
13.60 per < oupte. 

With a p ologie s , the < olumiam 

wishes tO ' oi Mi t the loot ball -< ln-diili- 

published iw<> weeks ago. I be W.P.I, 
game will be played in Amherst and 
not in Worcester, as announced. 



I here will Im- no issu e ol I he 
(<il. I. I.i. IAN neat Week be< ails<' ol 

I n> iday being a holida) . 






Girls' <.!•■. Club 

u DUbunementi 
Bats 



\\:m 01 



• 



Re .-ipi • 



at as i-' 

Ruinler DmKicis 
$1 Ci 'J7 DUburaei 
1006 •> Balan. c 






»12o 

Con tin u< 



$14!» It 

I1&9 i.' 

$K17 (>7 
:t72 46 

liasj 






on Page 2) 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 1926 



3 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official IMWtpapflf "f Aj Ma^achusitts 

Agricultural College, Pupliahed every 
Wednesday by the student*. 

HOARD OF EDITORS 

Wiluam L. Dun, f» l.<l.to.-in -< l.i.t 

Ellswokih Baknakd 91 MaM0Bfl Editor 

DEPAR1 mini EDITORS 

luli.orial William 1-. DOU "^7 

C.n,pu.N.»- Jj-gf fc ■«-« 2 

Loinu T. '<" '• '-"•* 
Faculty & Bhort I WUM 1:.>w\k» H. N" Hi* 
IstercoUcgiaU EdHw Fa*» ■• ' ■ iu " ' ' - 7 
Co-Kd News Josi I'iiim PAMSH a M 



Receipt* 

!<<•< eipti 
Deficit 



ACADEMICS BOARD 

Continued from i'aile 1) 

Debating 
1144.90 Disbursements 1164 00 

lti7 Index 
11901. M DUwurttOWStt 19017.14 

'.'.-. Ml 



S2017.14 



$2017. M 

Judftlnfi Team* 
( 'ash un ha.nl 1807.13 PUb WM— f *'-'"» •»■' 

ReoelpU MS.SO Baton* 828 M 



8560 83 



1689 88 

General Fund 
Cash on ban. 1 8879.94 DttbwiWMBtf $1032 87 
Receipt. 1180.41 Bataaei 81008 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Chakus i ( lAoa "27 HuMn.ss Manuu 

Ltwn H Whituii 27 Advertising Manager 

j^l'Vm.K VI Clrculatkm Mwi« 

Do"gi.as \v. Unwc '-'h 

Edwin A, Wn DM 98 

Hakoi.u K. Anmil 29 
Lawuncb A. ( akki in 29 

Will IAM A, 1'XiAN 29 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts ( ou.ec.ian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as poss ible. 

— ir„,-.reH aa second-clasn matter at the Amber* 
1^ Office JSSSSS lor maUin. at ipectal rate 

orjost^provi,!., 1 ! for In s., .ion 1 103 Act d I ■ - 
toiler, 1917. authorteed Aimust 20, 1918. 



National Conservatism 
So doubt you remember the vote taken 
in aeeembly Uurt »pring, to dweover the 

undergraduate attitude lowd « om , I- 

wry chapel. You arc prefcabb aware 
,| 1;lt t he outcome ol thai poll indicated 
thai the majority ol the .mdrrgra, uau-s 

at Maaa. Aggie did BO! favor any change 

from mir present regime, rhia poll wai 

a part of a nation- Wide siirx.-y the Mm- 

mary ol which we are taking the 

liberty to present in part at tins, time. 

•That the undergraduate, la. iron, 
being more atheutic or insensible to 
religion today than he was 25 years ago. 

has now a -Wan! perception ol therela 

ti()I1 o| religion to We and social service, 
is the most striking conclusion to be 
drawn from the nationwide survey ol 
com?ubory chapel. The 'nveat^gauon^ 
the result ol which embraced every state 
in the union cwepl two, inc u.le.l t! e 
•eiidins ol questionnairea to the college 
Sesidents^ aid the undergraduate editor. 
,1 the nation, as well as to a representa- 
™ve group of ministers who tmiuently 
appear before coHege sasembhes <>t w*. 

^SHel itbeaaidthal "the Rgt^w" 
among undergraduates on the subbed ol 
compSlsory chape .; not« *«espread 
as on.- might be led to beheye. It « 
,,,,!„.,■ interesting to note that New 
England is outstandingly oppos.,1 to 
S,mpulson chapel; but even this partol 
thec^untn is opposed by onl 3 a nan w 
margin. The South is almost universally 
in fifvor of compulson chapel, while the 
rest ol the country rathe favor*. .... .- 

pulM.rv week-day chapel and i would 
E™ Sunday attendance to the 
Bciences ol the individuals. Another 
interesting division is that between the 

small cnlkgi san.it He larger colleges and 
universities Thi principle cf compulsory 
,.,,,.! prevails in moat of the small 
colleges while it has never prevailed « 
i, hM been abandoned in the majority 
of the large, institutions. Only four 
caeaol revolt againsj the presenl regime 
have ben discovered by the committee 
in charge of the Hirvey. 

The mos, interesting part of the report 
is that pari which deals with .the ^rephes 
from the ministers who speak in these 
chapels. There -em to be two dwtincl 

LdiS. in thk group. , ^f ,H ;{;'; ,v ;;:. 

compulsion on the grounds that t 
voluntary attenden are the ones who 
leasl need chapel exercises, [he othe. 
group is not in favor ol ron.puls.on foi 
Everal reasons. The Rev ; : tkorgej Craig 
Stewart ol 1. van-ton. Illinois, declared 
that he "would rathei speak toahundred 
men who were there because tlwy wanted 
to come, than to a thousand students 

who were goosestepped to the scv.ee.. 
Too often college students who are forced 
to substitute college chapel on Sundays 
(or attendance in their own parish 
churches gel in the habit ..l appraising 
the value of a service solely mtne terms 
of the sermon.... During the four years 
i„ college a Methodic boy soughl to 
become a rnon stalwart Methodist, an 
Episcopalian, a better Episcopalian, etc., 
so that these churches max become re- 
vitalized and renew, d U the fresh, '"- 
telligent, gifted young life pounng tnto 
them out ol the colleges. 

Mthough there wen- s-me statenients 
to the contrary, bx tar the majority ol 
those who reported on religious tendencies 
had convictions simiiai to those expressed 
as follows by Presideni Karramiot« orm u: 
•■I, is obvious "thai these years nave 
xMine-cd i.. the world al larg. a decreas- 
ing interesl in creed-, but 1 am inclined 
,,, ,hink that there has been, and particu- 
larly in these last years, an increasing 
interesl in the fundamental religious 
problems.. ..in that increasing interesl the 
undergraduates ol our colleges partici- 
pate. ,! Some believe thai the under- 
eraduates emphasiw the social aspects 
of religion while others set the students 
as individualists. 

\ national survey is always interesting. 
This one concerns itsell with a question 
in which all ...liege undergraduates 
should be interested. Those oi us who 
were disgusted with the results <>i the 
this particular college last 
. be eomlortcd to realize that 
no more conservative than many 
ol oui colleagues throughout the country 



>|M2 3.1 *»->- :ir> 

BtgBed 

PRANK PRENTICE RANI). 
General Manager AA.n. 



COLLEGIAN BOARD ANNOUNCES 

(Continued from Page 1; 

head of the campus department and will 
be assisted by William K. I'hinney '99. 
Louise T. Rice '2'J of (ireenl.eld has been 
elected to the Hoard of Kditors and will 

assist in the campus department. Ed- 
ward H. Nichols 'liit, in addition to serving 
as faculty editor, will be in charge of all 
news in the various short courses. The 
rest of the Hoard will remain unchanged. 
There are still a number of positions 
Vacant but these will not be filled until 
next term when the present competition 
closes. Ten freshmen reported last Wed- 
nesday for the competition but more 
Competitors are needed especially from 
the sophomore class. All who are interes- 
ted should report tonight at X p. in. in 

the ( OELEG1AN Office. 



INDEX PICTURES NOW BEING 

Continued from Tuge 1; 

Wednesday until all have been taken. An 
initial payment of one doll... and fifty 

cents is required at the time of sitting to 

cover the cost of a glossy print. H 
photographs are ordered, however, this 

payment will be deducted from the cost, 

which will be eight, ten. and twelve 
dollars a do/en. 



Town Hall, Amherst 



"THE BUM) GODDESS 
with Jack Holt. Esther Ral- 
ston, Louise l)ret>ser and 
Ernest Torrence. 

The "Blind Coddesn" U 
the thrilling romance of ., 
young lawyer, who, becom- 
ing a public prosecutor in 
New York City, Is forced .<, 
choose between his ideal of 
duty and the girl he love* 
Harold l.loyd in "1 I o" New, 




s.irvcv 

spring may 



/) PEPPERMINT 
' FLAVOR 

A lasting treat 
and good for 
teeth, appetite, 
and digestion. 




i.-.?fc/, 




Desk Fittings 
Memorandum Pads 
Paper Clips 
Library Scissors 
Paper Weights 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 




Saturday 

3. so 

4.45 8.3S 



-MV OLD HI TCH" K., 

m.inci that is senium rn, | 
without being saccharine k 
depicted in a beautiful ami 
touching manner in "M\ 
Old Dutch", which has had 
its inspiration from tht old 
English Ballad of halt ., 
century ago. fat O'MsUej 
and Mayi-McAvoy ,gi\e re- 
markable performances ,i, 
husband and wife in three 
dlherent ages, (ullanl.m 
dis and Jane VS in ton sup pi > 
young romance. ^ 
Sporilight & 1 Reel Conn d\ 



•THAT'S MV RABY" 
Another Douglas Maclean 
triumph! .some show, some 
title, some picture, some 
gags, some laughs — Maclean 
comedy. . A faramoum 
picture. s 

News and (omcd\ 



G125 



handy 
'packs 



v 



^^ '<••••,', ';.,,v,..;\ 

IwP " ^o',V/;';'''V, l V.'-V.'','; ;; .'''' 
|i^, -ci" •..., ; .'.v 1 >".: , .\i:.,'...\r..'... .■ 



In the Rough 

Everyone gets in the rough 
sometimes — in life as in golf. 
And about the worst "rough" 
is illness or accident. 
When you run into that, 
you'll appreciate the help of a 
good life insurance contract. 
If you're disabled more than 
a few weeks, our life contract 
pays a monthly income until 
vou recover. In addition, 
you're relieved of paying pre- 
miums and your insurance is 
kept in force. 
Circular 822 explains it. 
Write for copy. 

Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company 

ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1873 M 
Greenfield, Mass. 



"BOB" DALRYMPLE will display 

REGAL COLLEGE SHOES 



— AT — 



FRATERNITIES 

Thursday, October 7 th 

Presenting the latest shoe styles for college men. 



All Leathers 
All "Styles „ 
All Sizes 
One Price - 




Scientifically 
fitted with Regal's 
Exclusive "RESCXV 
System. 



REGAL SHOES 

"Direct University Service" 



anasft e g a 







Recommended by the 

English Department of 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

WEBSTER'S 
COLLEGIATE 

The Best Abridged Dictionary— Based upon 

WEBSTER'S NEW INTERNATIONAL 

A Short Cut to Accurate Information. Here is ■ companion 
for your hours of reading and study that will prove ha real 
value every timo you cor. . . A wraith of read, .nformation 
on words, people, places, is instantly yours. 
106,00 I v iris with definitions, etymologies, 
pronunciation* and use in its 1,256 pages. 
Hltietrajdona. Include* dictfonarieeol 
•irraphy and geography anil other special 
features. Printed on Bible Paper. 
See It i.t Yout College Bookwtotm or Write 
tot Information to the Publishers. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO. 

Springfield, MaM. 






r CLOTHES 



Ready-made 
And Cut to Order 

ESTABLISHED ENGLISH UNIVERSITY 
STYLES, TAILORED OVER YOUTHFUL 
CHARTS SOLELY FOR DISTINGUISHED 
SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES. 



i i 




ouse 



Suits and Overcoat* 
»40, *45, *50 




n 

imi 
fin/"]. 



M/ik 

Hum 






11"1aY back in 1892— over a quarter of a century 

**s ago Purina Mills started with an ideal. 

That ideal was to provide farmers with rations scien- 
tifically, honestly and practically made to lower their 
cost of production. After thirty years time we can 
see the fruit of that ideal. Records the country over 
prove that Purina Chows are accomplishing their 
purpose. They are lowering production costs for 
thousands and thousands. The many graduates 
from the better agricultural colleges, who have 
joined the Purina Mills research laboratories or 
field forces, are entitled to a big share of the credit. 



URINA MILLS 



ST.10U1S MASrlVILU 



BUFFALO E.ST.L0UIS MINNEAPOLIS KANSAS CITY FORTWOB 



RESHMEN — 

Hand Tailoring is like hand writing— it may be good or bad, you take no chances when you put your money into a 
HICKEY-FREEMAN suit,— 

"CONSULT TOM." 



Discriminating "Aggie" men 

BUY THEIR 

SHOES 
GOLF HOSE 
SWEATERS 
SHIRTS and 
TIES 

— : AT :— 

GINSBURG'S 

19 PLEASANT ST. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First home smith of campus. 

Telephone 511 



(dim week-end \i-.iin.s were "Hank" 
Darlini '24, "Ducky" Kenned) '94 and 
"Ted" Grant, ..II here <»n .. "pleasure 
trip." "I l.mk" i- Mlliii>; bonda for Blake 
v\ ( o., "Ted" i> in the |ui»t buunew, in 
AuburndeJe, .....I "Ducky" ia Mill ... the 
milk game. 



THOMPSONS TIMELY TALKS 

l.ulfi.1 Columbia NKW I'KOCKSS KI.OHDS 

I I In- New SI. I on In HIiicn 

I My M.i ma's In Towa No. Ii»7l> 

I Who Wouldn't No 70HII 

, Someone U I.ohIii Siimin Trudy No. .'nl> 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMIIKRST BANK 



LOOK I I liavi- just put iu a nice new stock <.i 



MEN'S WATCHES 
DIAMOND RINCK 



Oflico Hours: 



LADIES' WRIST WAICIIES 
WEDDINt; RINtiS 
INGHHlttl Now on Display. 

LOOK FOR THE BIG SIGN— 



Mlllltl:l\ 
I in silay 
\\ I'diicsilav 

Tkimdai 
Kriduy 

Saturday 



.1:00 to i.. on I' M. 

7:00 to 10:00 

.1:00 to 6:00 " 

7:00 to I0:IHI 

.1:00 to I. 00 
1 1:00 to S00 

i 7:(MI to 10:00 



BOB AMES '27 

IIU'KNOMll K 

WATCH, CLOCK and JEWELRY Repairing 

46 IMeaaanl Si , .or llall.uk, - AMIIKRST, M ASS. 
WIIKHK VOU «.l I SKKMCK 



Tel. 451-R — -(Corrected Tetephone Number). 



SUGGESTION) 



Cm out for future use 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 




With the hemimphericml Integrator the illuminating engineer meamurem light 
intenaitiea and distribution. Thome laboratory hndinga are ptactii ally 
applied to improve our everyday illumination. 

When the sun goes down 

More than 350,000,000 incandescent lamps, vrth a 
combined light of nine billion candlepower, make: 
city streets, stores, and homes brighter than over 
before. 

In bungalow or mansion, workshop or factory, 
dormitory or auditorium, there is no excuse for 
poor illumination. We have cheaper and better 
lighting in the electric lamp than ever before; for 
the dollar that bought 1,115 candlepower-hours of 
light with the carbon-filament lamps of 1886, 
now buys 16,200 candlepower-hours of light with 
the MAZDA lamps. 

Not only more light, but correctly applied light, is 
the order of the day. The electric lamp, with its 
fiameless yet highly concentrated light source, 
lends itself ideally to reflectors, shades, and screens. 
It is controlled light safe light. And illumina- 
tion becomes an exact science. 



The General Electric 
Company is the world's 
largest manufacturer of 
incandescent lamps. And 
behind the G-E Mazda 
lamps are vast research 
laboratories dedicated 
to cheaper and better 
electric illumination, and 
to the conservation of 
eyesight. 

A series of G-E adver- 
tisements showing what 
electricity is doing in 
many fields will be sent 
on request. Ask for 
booklet GEK-1. 




During college days and in after life, correct light- 
ing must ever be of paramount importance to the 
college man and v/oman. Good lighting is the 
worthy handmaiden cf culture and progress. 






GENERAL ELECTRIC 



O EN_E R A J, 



ELECTRIC 



COMPANY 



SCHENECTADY 



NEW 



YORK 
3-8- Jft 



ties 

Showcases full of distinctive patterns and beautiful colorings. TIES that uphold the reputation that BOLTER 
has always enjoyed. Best neckwear in town. _^ w ■*iin i 

CARL H. BOLTER hyanms 

AMHERST 



EXETER 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 1926 



You will find an eicellunt 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 

equipped with the moil up-to-date Goodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at It » Amlty-S... Of*. Htm I heatre 

Wt understand your requirement-: and art pre- 

pared to meet your needs. 

All work guaranteed. Shots shintd and dyed. M 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 

The Best In Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 
Tke> 'j testCcUL Store 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 
prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up on filfiht) 

OculUti Prescription. Fitted Broken law 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and otn.r 

reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While l Walt 

NEW PRICES 
Mens Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - - eW-55 
Men's Half Soles. Rubber HeeU - - - 1?5 
Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - - 2.2J 

Men's Half Soles LS# 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 

Open till 8 P. M. 



WELCOME TO AGGIE STUDENTS! 

We have already in stock the most up-to- 
date Oxfords for college wear, also we have 
established i -i>"<- ruwJruifl depa rt wan t in con- 
noctioo with our regular shoe stun-. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, M«*| 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guarantee 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS 01 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite I'dsC t > tlit. 



Clothing and Haberdashery 

Where College 



M 



en 



Like to Trade 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

SAN TOX SCIENTIFIC TOOTH BRUSH-Used with your fav- 
orite dentrifice wili give satisfactory results. Dentnfice of 
all kinds. 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



FRESHMEN WIN DECISIVE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

This is one of the few times in the 
history of the event that the freshmen haw 
succeeded in pulling their rivals through. 
The last time that the contest ended with 
>uch a result was when the class of 1936 
then sophomores, were dragged across l>y 
H>l2ti. An added interest was lent to the 
occasion this year hy the fact that for 
two years neither class has been pulled 
through, although in each case the 
freshmen have had the advantage. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

M. A. C. Stationery 

Fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cent. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



44 



BOSTONIANS" 



m Sf 



\, 



The well dressed College man prefers 
Bostonians because they are distinctive in 
style, highest in quality and yet reasona- 
ble in price. 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



SLICKERS 

Yellow or Olive = - $5.50 

Black with buckles - 6.00 

Laundry Cases $1.75 to 2.25 

Black all wool sweaters 

$9 and $10 

If you need a suit this Fall drop in and 
look them over. Real values at $25- $40 



list this 
under 
major 
sports" 



r. ' 



VY 




ff 



Blue Twill Suits at 



$40.00 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



THERE'S no other sport on the calendar to 
compare with smoking a jimmy-pipe packed 
with P. A. Indoors and out. Any season. You 
v in even when you draw, if you get what we 
me..n. And how you will draw, once you know 
the wonderful taste of Prince Albert! 

Cool as an over-cut notice from the dean. 
Sweet as the thoughts of a holiday. Fragrant as 
woodland flowers after a spring shower. P. A. 
never bites your tongue or parches your throat. 
The Prince Albert process fixed that the day 
P. A. matriculated. 

Come out for this major sport. Get yourself 
a tidy red tin at that nearby smoke-shop where 
they hand out P. A. sunshine. You and Prince 
Albert are going to be great buddies right from 
the start. Because there just never was another 
tobacco like Prince Albert! 

Fringe albert 

—no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. U told everywhere in 
tidy red tint, found and hatf- 
pound tin humidors, and 
pound crystal-glass humidors 
with tponge-moittener top. 
And always with every bit 
of bite and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert process. 




* 1026. R. J. Reynolds Tobscro 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 




FREE 

CRANK CASE 
SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SI|g jWagfiarltUHgttfl (Collet tit 

\Zt ww'i i * imrncT mTTTTT. „,,m^i^<..^ » «r 77777T ^ 777^ — * — : 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20, 1926 



Large Crowd Celebrates 

Mountain Day on Toby 

Fine Day Causes Many to Make Climb. Part of Refreshments 

Fail to Arrive 



>! nber 4 



Ihe summit of Mi. Toby presented ■ 
festive appearance on Thursday, October 
;, when a large company <>t M.A.C. stu- 
dents ami faculty assembled there to 

celebrate the annual Mountain D.i\ . 

which i» already becoming a well eetab 

lithed institution at this CoUefC. A 

holiday having bees declared l>y tin 
College authorities, a large number <>t 

the student body showed their apprccia- 

tiorj of this privilege by making the 
journey to Mt. Toby. 

Many and diverse we the vvavs bv 
which the merry-makers reached the 
-uiiiinit. Some rode on horses borrowed 
from the R.O.T.C unit; some went in 
bttssea. some hiked the entire distance, 
ni.l still others tried "bumming", with 
more or less success. By noon most ol 
die company had reached the summit, 
.md the tower was so crowded with sight- 
Stsffl, that one- could reach the top only 
after a strenuous struggle. Those who 
acted, however, were rewarded bv a 
iiiticent view. The air was clear, and 
DM could see for miles in all directions, 
while closer at hand the brilliant colors 
„f the autumn foliage added to the lieauty 
ol the scene. 

When it was time for lunch, however, 
trouble appeared. Only part of the pn>- 
risiooa, including lunches from the Dining 
Hall, and apples and gra|>cs furnished by 
ihe College, arrived; and. worst of all, 
oaty one keg of cider! Kven such a 
mishap, however, could not dull the spirits 
,.t the party. Those who had, shared with 
those who had not, and nobody went 
hungry. 

A short entertainment followed the 
lunch. The first s|>cakcr was I'rof. Waugh, 
who ga\ e an interesting talk on the history 
.1 \lt. Toby. He was followed by I'rof. 
'.rose of the Forestry Department, who 
i>sed the different kinds of timber 
which grow on the mountain, and amused 
the crowd with stories concerning the 
■ vploits of "Paul Bunion". Another 
ure of the program which created 
much amusement was a pie-eating con- 
This was won by R.M.Cobb '27 
who covered himself with glory and blue- 
beny pie. After this, entertainment of 
in equally intellectual sort was furnished 
by Dean Burns, at the urging of some 
audsnta who evidently felt, as he said, 
that no "Aggie eelebration was complete 
without a speech from Dean Burns." He 
KM at length silenced, however, and soon 
■ftenmrd, the company dis|H-rsed, and 

M.k their various ways back to Amherst, 



Football Spectator 

Dies at Infirmary 



Father of Viaiting Player Stricken 
While Watching Game. 

Mr. C. Harlow Coe. aged 44, of Hert- 
ford, Conn., died early last Saturday 
morning at the Aggie Infirmary from an 
attack of chronic nephritis. Mr. Coe, a 
manufacturer, was the father of a member 
"f the Connecticut Agricultural College 
'reshman football team, which was here 
'o play the Two Year team. He was 
matching the game last Friday afternoon, 
*hen he was stricken on the field and 
' fken to the infirmary. His son was with 
mm when he died. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Knowledge is proud that he has 

learned so much; 
Wisdom is humble that he knows 

no more " 

— Cowper 



hursday — 

8.45 Assembly: James T. Nicholson 
'16, American Red Cross, Wash- 



Thursday— 
5 Asseniu 
16, American Red 
ington, D.C. 
8.46 Faculty Riding Class. 
7..U) I nt erf rat entity Conference 
Meeting. 
Friday— 
Varsity Cross-Country: W.P.I, here. 
Faculty Dance. 

Kappa Sigma Friday Night Dance. 
|heeta Chi Friday Night Dance. 
two-Year Football: Vermont 
c Academy, here. 
Saturday—' 
£30 Vanity Football: W.P.I, here. 
Phi Sigma Kappa House Dance. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

STARTS PRACTICING 



Fifteen New Members Inducted at 
First Practice. 



The Girls' Glee Club started this week 

in an auspicious manner when at its Inst 
rehearsal it took on fifteen new members. 

I his year rehearsals are to he held e\cry 

Monday ami Wednesday evening at x 
o'clock. Mrs. A. B. Beaumont who 
coached the club last year and who will 
continue her work with the girls, says 
that she baa some- es|x-eially good talent 
to work with this year. Ruth Davison 
'27, manager of the club, is making 
arrangements tor the concerts which are 
to be given, and both the old member 
and the new members are co-operating to 
make- this year a successful one. 
A list ot the- new members follows: 
'29 — Edith Bertenshaw, Alice Johnson, 
Elizabeth Lynch, Gladys Sivert, Doris 
Whittle. '30 — Stina Berggren, Monica 
Cotter, Margaret Donovan, Lucy Grun- 
waldt, Elate llaubenreiser, Kathryn 
Knight, C.ertrude Maylott, Ida Pollin, 
Margaret Swell, Elizabeth Woodin. 



Clark to Represent 

Interfraternity Group 

Elected Delegate to National Council 
at New York. 



At the firsi meeting of the Interfra- 
ternity Conference of the year, October 
7, Harold F. Clark '2K of Montague was 
elected as the representative' of the 
M.A.C. Interfraternity Conference at 
the National Undergraduate Interfra- 
ternity Council which will be held in 

New York City, November 20-27. Edwia 
E. Marsh '2K of Pittsficld was chosen 
alternate-. 

The constitution of the Conference' was 
discussed and several changes were made. 
This revisal was deemed necessary in 
order to meet the present conditions re- 
garding fraternities in general. 

The Interfraternity Singing Contest 
which was inaugurated last year was 
next discussed. This year it will be con- 
ducted under the auspices of the Inter- 
fraternity Conference and at least six 

groups will co m p ete . 

A committee on penalties was chosen 
to consider what should lie done in en 
forcing the rushing rules which were in 
force at the beginning of the fall term. 

AMSTEIN ELECTED 

FOOTBALL CAPTAIN 



Will Lead M.A.C. Team Against 
Strong Worcester Tech Aggregation 
on Saturday. 



1928 INDEX PICTURES 

Sunday, October 17 

10.30 Ac a<lt luie Ac ti\ it ies Board 
10.45 Senate 

I I. (K) Adclphia 

M.I.") Maroon Ki \ 
11.30 Men 'a Glee Club 
1 l.4f» Roister Doisti 1 1 

12.00 Index Bc.aid 

12. 1"' Helta Phi Gamma 



Enthusiasm Grows for 

Aggie Outing Club 

Many Men and Women Want 
Organization Formed. 



The new project cm the- campus, the 
Outing Club, promises to meet with 
success. between sixty and seventy 
students attended the lust meeting held 
in Memorial Hall, Thursday evening, 
October 14; about a dozen of these were 
co-eds. I'rof. Curry S. Hicks and Prof. 
Lawrence Grose s|>okc to the assembled 
group. Several students presented the 
pin |M)se of the organization. A committee 
was appointed to draw up a constitution. 
As soon as this procedure is finished there 
will be another meeting held so that the 
club may start its work immediately. 
Over a hundred of the students have 
indorsed the plan and several of the 
members of the faculty are lending their 
support. With this backing the me n who 
are organizing the club look forward to 
another addition to the activities of 
M.A.C. 

AGGIE HARRIERS WIN 
FIRST RACE OF SEASON 



Connecticut Victors Eg. 1 

in Hard Fought C- - me 

Aggie Eleven, Although Beaten, Shows Much Improvement. 
Forward Passing Brings Losers only Score. 



Snell, a Sophomore, Shows Up Well, 



The freshmen bad their first chance- to 
perform on the- chapel Ih-II Saturday, 
• letolx-r B, when the M.A.C. harriers 
defeated Tufts here by a score of 2tj-."W 
in the first meet of the- season. Captain 
Lester of Tufts took first place in the fast 
time of 27.2 minutes, slightly over hall 
a minute slower than the course record 
of 2f>.">4 minutes, established by Lane- of 
Amherst last year. Lester was battled 
all the way to the tana bv Snell, a sopho- 
more, running his first varsity race-, who 
finished only a yard behind him. 

The summary: 

Lester (T) 1st, Snell (M) 2nd, Johnson 
(T) Srd, lleiineberry (M) 4th, Swan (M) 
5th, Hickey (T) 6th, Notte-baert (M) 7th, 
Preston (Mi 0th, Biron (ftf) 9th, < rooks 
(M) 10th, Rosen CT) llth, Clarke <T) 
12th, Manag (T) 13th, Holland (T; 14th. 



The Aggie eleven will enter the Wor- 
cester Tech game this Saturday under 
the leadership of a full-fledged captain, 
(Continued on Pag* 2) 



Additional Building 

Equipment (or College 

Eiperiment Station and Farm 
Equipment are Increased. 



During the past summer new buildings 
have been erected at the Cranberry 
Experiment Station at East Wareham to 
replace those destroyed by fire on the 
night of March .'JO, last. These buildings 
are of cement-block construction, nearly 
fire-proof, and give enlarged facilities for 
the work of the station. The Auditorium 
is increased in size, to meet the needs of 
the increasing numbers attending the 
summer meetings of the Cranberry 
Association. Larger laboratories are also 
available. 

In addition to the foregoing, the Ex- 
periment Station equipment is being in- 
creased by the erection of a dwelling house, 
office building, and laboratory on the 
Tillson Farm, to care for the expanding 
work in the study of genetics in poultry. 
This building is to be occupied this fall. 

On the College Farm, an isolation and 
quarantine stable- is being built to give 
facilities for the Study, and ultimately 
for the- control, of bovine diseases. I his 
addition to the farm equipment has long 

been needed, and will be available for 
IMC in a verv few weeks. 



Williams Is Beaten 

By Cross-Country Team 

First Time Ever Defeated on Their 
Home Course. 



LONG RUNS CAUSE 

DEFEAT OF AGGIE 

an* a a a 

learns of Maroon Rooters Watch 
Came at VYilliamstown. 

The Agates, accompanied bv a goedly 

crowd ol supporters, journeyed to Wil 

liainstown last Saturday, but lell victims 

by a score ol 20 to to a rejuvenated 
purple eleven, which threw despair into 
the Aggie camp with two touchdowns 
within the opening minutes of plav. 

According to form displayed thus far, 
the- M.A.C. eleven should plav its se-eonel 
half first, for the psychological effect upon 
their opponents. This contest was no 
exception, since- the stubborn de-feiise of 
the Agates in the second half held two 
complete op|>osing elevens to a single- 
field goal. 

The game was initiated with a spectac- 
ular clash by Fall, the Williams epiaite-r- 
bae k, who ran back the kick-off for a 
tone lidown. Nol long afterward this same 
quarterback faked a pass and then 
e ircled right end for another tally. 

Aggie ho|)e-s were high a lew minutes 
later when a Williams plavei fumbled 
the ball when tackled and Johnson re- 
covered the- aval and covered 80 yards 
before be was thrown. This plav resulted 
disastrously, however, for Johnson was 
taken from the game with an injured knee, 
and the ball was brought back. 

I arty in the in \t period, Williams ad 

vane eel the ball near enough to the Aggie- 
goal t«> allow Howe- to score- a drop kick. 

Subsequently the Purple eleven tried to 

(Continued on I'mie 1) 



ASSEMBLY IS TURNED 

INTO S0NG-FEST 



M.J. Brines, Prominent Song Leader, 
Takes Charge. 



The cross-country team made its second 
consecutive win of the season when it 
decisively defeated the Royal Purple 
harriers on their home course by a score 
of 19-.'J9. Since the sport was started at 
Williams their cross-country teams have 
met with only three defeats, two of which 
are now credited to M.A.C, and this is 
the first time that they have ever Ixen 
defeated on their home course. They 
badly miss the strong material that they 
have had in |>ast years. Swan of M.A.C. 
finished first in the moderately fast time 
of 27 minutes, 61.5 seconds. He was 
closely followed by Capt. Adams of 
Williams. The order at the finish was as 
follows: Swan (M], Adams (W), Biron 
(M), Henneberry (Ml, Preston (M), 
Crooks (M), Crecn (W), Keale (\\>, 
Moore (W), Childs (W). 

Wesleyan comes here Friday for the 
third meet of the season and there is 
hope that the memory of past defeats at 
their hands may be wiped out, though 
they are rated by Coach Derby as one- of 
the best teams on the schedule. 



FACULTY 

Major N. Butler Briscoe- was one- of 
the- judges at the Mt. Holyoke llor-M 
Show and Sergt. Cronk was the announcer. 



Miss Vondetl, who is w<-ll known on 
the- campus, was operated on for appendi- 
citis last Friday in the- Marv Hitchcock 

Hospital at Hanover, N.H. 



Al Assembly last Thursday, the in- 
tensive drive- for more and better college 
singing was continued with the intro- 
duction of Mr. Moses J. Brines, a teacher 
ol group singing, lie gave- a short intro- 
ductory talk on the salient principles of 
group singing and the- meaning of the 
several movements of the hands and arms 
used by the- song leader. After a short 
drill on these- principles Mr. Brines led 
in the singing of "The Long Long Trail" 
and "America". After this the entire 
Student body sang the college song to a 
running fire of suggestions and criticisms 
by Mr. Brines. Much improvement wa s 
noted in the successive repetitions. 

Mr. Brines intrtxluced a few comic 
songs which made an immediate hit with 
the students. The rather unusual pro- 
gram which Mr. Brines presented won 
unanimous approval. From time to time- 
Neil Robinson, song leader, was given a 
chance to practice the suggestions which 
were made. 



Index Competition 

Will Open Early 

Candidates for 1929 Board Asked to 
Report October 2H. 



Competition for positions on the- I'.l^.t 
Index Board will open on October 28 at 
a regular meeting of the- 1928 lfe,ard. All 
so ph om o res Who would like to try out 
for the literary, art, photographic, or 
statistics dep ar tments sh o ul d be present 
at this meeting to receive- their assign- 
ments. 

Competition is opening early to enable 
the statistics department of the 1928 

Hoard to make- use- of the- material 

gathered bv the- sophomore candidates. 

Those- aspiring to places in the other 

departments will be- required to hand in 

exhibits of their ability by Januarv 1 .",. 
A record of the- work of each competitor 
will be- kept, and elections will be bi-ld on 
the ba-a- o| the- qualtt) and quant it) ol 
work clone. 

Further announcements will appear in 
next week's < 'ollkoian. 



Ihe Mass. Aggie football waniois met 
a heavy, well chilled eleven, the Ce.unec- 
tieiit Aggies, on October on Alumni 

Field, and ware forced to accept the -hmt 

end ol a l.'i to li s.oie-. The gamene-ss of 
the Agates prevented a worse- dele. il at 
the hands ol the Nut meggers, the- visitors 
being halted twice on the live vard line 

in the- second quarter, As a anal demon 
stration oi their fighting qualities the 

' iCremen made- a chive in the tinal |h- I 

which iie-ttcel them a ton, hdown and nave- 
their opponents no little- cause lor worry. 

1 onneclie lit first tallied in the second 
period, a pass lie. m I-.. lily to Sehoticld 
placing the oval beyond the goal posts. 
Two other onslaughts were- repulsed by 
the home team, half lime coming wilh 
the Agates eles|>e-rat»-lv holding on their 
tiv e yard slripe. 

Sehofielel and Eddy reversed their 
passing combination in the next session 
to bring the ball to within live yards of 
the Aggie- goal, and then \oonan skin,el 
right end for another tally. 

For the remainde-r of the- game the 
eleven which sei-mecl destined to defeat 
outplayed the visitors. Cox broke through 
for a long run at this stage, and the- lm.il 
period saw both teams take- to the air. 
Co nn e ct icut could no repeal their earlier 
success however, and several well timed 
forwards by the- Agates, combined wilh 
an intercepted pass and dashes by John 
son and Cook, placed the Maroon team 
in a position to score- on a pass from Cox 
to McKittrie k. 

Although the visitors completed more 
forwards, their record of failures was no 
Utter than that of the- Agates The 
work of tin- whole Mass. Aggie- team, and 
eepecially that of the line, showed great 
improvement and compelled the Nut- 
megger to e am the- v ie tory. The- passing 
of Cox and Johnson was as good as that 
of the visitors, who ate- reputedly sironjj 
in that department. The liue-pliiiiging of 
Williams was a large lac tor in Cornice ti 
cut's vie tory. The- summary: 

Mass. Aggies Conn. Aggies 

Bowie-, ( oukus, Rice, ic 

Ie, Kennedy, S hildrcn 
Atiiste-in, rl It, l.ongo 

(art wright, Ke-lton, rg lg, Lore-nt/cn 

Me Allister, Mills, Milhern.c , , Daly 

Anderson, Black, Walkden, Ig 

rg, Zollin, < olue-rcio 
Mtirelough, It rl, Sayers 

McKittrie k, Ie- re. Callahan, Wilson 

Cox, c|b qb, Se holield, Knout 

Oiiinn, llae-rtl, N ( >cllnian, Tufts, rhb 

Ihb, Noonan, Smith, Anderson 
Johnson, Ihb rhb, Eddy 

Cook, Mahoney, fb fb, Williams 

Store: \.i »>. Touchdowns: Se hejfield, 
Noonan, Me Kittrick. Points after touch- 
down : Fddy. Referee: Johnson. I'mpire; 
Coulter. Linesman: Whalen. Time: four. 
l.'i minute periods. 

Ninety Frosh Elnter 

Aggie Two- Year Course 

Enrollment Slightly Lower Than 
Last Year. 

t.ir O ct ober f>, the Two- Year course 
opened with a total enrollment of lofl 
students. Of this number BO are fresh- 
men. Every state in New Kngland 
with the exception of Rhode Island is 
represented among the new rncinl>crs of 
the course. The registration is a little 
below that of last year but with several 
more im -tiding it is eip a tta d that the 
freshman registration will equal the 
record set last year. It is interesting to 
note- that 7t> out of 101 of last year's 
class have returned to complete the 
course. This is a little belter proportion 
than usual beceUM many find good 
posit iorrs at the- end of their first year's 
work. 






OPPONENTS SCORES 



Worcester Tech. 16, Trinity 
Worcester Tech 0, Rensalaer o 
Amherst 7, Bowdoin 7 
Amherst 14, II imihon o 
Springfield 7, K.I'J.u 
hi laware 3, Springfield • 
Tufts 10, Bowdoin 7 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20, 1926 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the M amch u«etti 
Agricultural College, Puplithed every 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

Wiiiixm 1- DOU -7 Kilitmn, < l,i.-l 

gUCWORTN eUSXAaD 'L'S llMHglai MHq» 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

,.;,,„,„..,! Will. AM 1.. DOU 

Atlil. ■ Hanoi 1. B. < LAM 'S» 

Atl " \\. Gordon Hi • r»i '» 

CamiHJf I* Es*B*T L. Swum BS TO 

Wii mam K. Phinkei 20 

l.ui n. T. Kkk l".i 

Faculty fc Short Coumt Ki.waki.ii.Nm sols TO 

Inn-nc.lU-Ki.it.- I'.liim PBAMCM C, Hi'.i. J7 

Co-Ed Newi j..m-.imhm. Pamcwa '-'* 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Chakiks K. CtAOQ '-'7 BttitoeM Managei 

Lewis 1! Wiihaki is "37 Advertising Managei 

John B. Wii.ie '27 C n« uU.tum Managei 

DOOOLM W. I... kim. "Js 

I I.WIN A. VVllUKH '38 

llAKi.ii. K. Anshii. "39 

UWKKNl K A. (AKKIIH 39 

William A. Kcan -2<l 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of rlianne of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

""Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accented for mailing at »!*«*' "g£ 
of postage provided for in sect on 1 10. .Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20, 191*. 



It you arc a normal person, you will 

find that ><>>• love your home We u* 
■peaking of home i" he broadest mum-, 
ci \« >« England, of the Middle West, or 
of the South, lor example. As ■ general 
rule the natural beauty peculiar to your 
home <li->iriii is an important influence in 
the development of i!>i> love. A recent 
assignment In Prof. Waugh'e art appreci 
ii ion course, brought out the fact that 
the New Hampshire hilli were much mon 
beautiful to thoae ^Ih> call Nee England 
home than the Colorado la n dscape * to 
which people travel from all parte of the 
earth. We may apply the same principle 
to our so u ks. W e love the beauty of our 

laii<lscapc~l>ccau'se it is a part ofourhoine. 

We shoulil love the beauty of our songs 
becauee they are a part of our college. 

How can we hesitate longer? I(l us 

become a sinning college! We have made 

a start, let us continue I let us put all 
the beauty into our songs that they de- 
serve, and truly become a sin^inn college! 



PERSONALS 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20, 1926 



AT THE ABBEY 



a singing college 

We have been much pleased to observe 
an increased interest in c oll eg e singing. 
A year ago, we idealists dared do no more 
than dream of a singing college at Mass. 
Aggie, but the germ is creeping in and we 
can now expect the realization of our 
dreams before long. Of course, we shall 
all have to co-operate or the enthusiasm 
may die off, because it has not yet seized 
the student body with fervor enough to 
sweep anyone or any group off his feet. 
Therefore, we shall do our bit by reiter- 
ating some of the statements get forth in 
favor of college singing, in hopes that we 
can add something new or present some 
of them from a new point of view. 

A singing college is as much a tradition 
as an aggrewive sophomore class. It 
ought to be one of Aggie's most delightful 
traditions because we have such good 
songs. Hut iust as a man is not appreci- 
ated in his own age, our songs seem to be 

unappreciated on our own campus. \\ itn- 

in the last two weeks, we have explored 
the possibilities of two or three of these 
songs and, in ever) case, they have stood 
the test, they have been found wanting 
only in the expression. Under able leader- 
ship, we have corrected some of our fault- 
in rendering them, and then we have 

proceeded to sing them quite spontane- 
ous!) in fraternity houses, in small groups 
around the Campus, and even while riding 

about the countryside, let us see to it 

that this spirit does not diminish. It is 
only by capitalizing our songs and b) 
singing them for practice that WC can 
hope to get a reputation as a singing 
college. It has always made Us jealous 
when we have heard our neighbors' 
singing praised. Vet we have bun well 
aware of the fact that they deserved such 
a reputation and that our singing had BO 
right to *r,e classed with theirs, even in 
our own mind. But we have been told 
within the last week that there is no 
reason why we cannot sing. We have 
sung well, at times. It is for the prestige 
of our college that we should sing. !t is 
for the prestige of our college that we 
should sing often so that we may sing well. 
It is for inspiration and in order that 
we may realize college spirit that we should 
sing. Fraternity spirit on the campus is 
very high. There are many men here 
whose fraternity spirit far exceeds their 
college spirit. Of course the fact that 
fraternity men are living together plays 
an important role in the development of 
fraternity spirit; but the traditions of the 
fraternity and the fact that fraternity 
men think they have a common tie which 
outsiders have not, play an immensely 
important part in the development and 
fostering of fraternity spirit. We have 
already used considerable space in these 
columns discussing traditions. Let them 
spe ak lor themselves. College singing, 
however, is a form of ritual. Why cannot 
we use our songs, something that is ours 
and no one else's, to arouse in us an affec- 
tion, an all-penetrating patriotism, for 

our own group? Prexy told us in chapel 

recently that no college spirit is better 
than at a singing college. PsycRotogJ tells 

us that the frame of mind is important. 
If WC associate our songs, symbols of joy. 
of enthusiasm, of -ell < ontulciu e, of pride 

in ourselves with Massachusetts Aggie, 
how can we help loving our Alma Mater, 
loving her with a love that means willing- 
Bess to do anything within our power 
for her. 



AN APOLOGY 

We wish to apologize to our readers for 
the large number of advertisements in the 
last issue. Even though the CoLLKGIAN 
is still paying off the debt which has been 
piling up for several years, we do not in- 
tend to have such a predominance of 
advertising matter. No doubt some of 
our readers find the ads more interesting 
than the news articles, but we intend to 
OXter primarily to our more appreciative 
subscriliers. At present, a new advertis- 
ing policy is lieing drawn up. With this 
new program, a recurrence of last week's 
disaster will Ik- impossible. For the re- 
mainder of the college year approximately 
one third of the space in each issue will be 
devoted to advertising. It is hoped that 
advertising can be relegated to a back 
seat in the near future, for we do not 
intend to run an "Amherst Trade News ", 
although we realize that the Town Hall 
advertisement and the Camel ad are 
probably as interesting as anything in the 

paper. 

With your i o •operation we hope to 

make the COLLEGIAN something of more 
general interest. The time is ripe to 
publish, in part at least, the policy of 
the present Collegian Board. We are 
distinctly in favor of features which are 
not necessary to a newspaper, but which, 
welKlie\c, willhel|)tobringtheCoLLEGlAN 
closer to the undergraduates, faculty, and 
alumni of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. We have already inaugurated a 
column of short personal items. In addi- 
tion, we have other s che m es up our sleeve, 

hanging there until We get nerve or oppor- 
tunity to let them out. We aim to co- 
operate with any other act ivitics connected 
with M.A.C. insolar as we can and we 
would appreciate any hints that any of 
you can give us in return. 



l.arl Bruertoa *96 ii in the plant 

propagation department Of Henry A. 
I in 1 1 at Riverton, N.J. 

— p — 

Harry Blo< k '26 is working tor the 

Texas Agricultural Experiment Station 

a.- a chemist .( II 
p 

Raj S mith is on a private estate at 

Essex, Mass. 

1> 

Solomon (.onion 'l'.". is teaching chem- 
istry at the Univ. ol Mass. in Boston. 

He received his masters degree iii Educa- 
tion from B.U. last June. 
P 

Barbara Huke '26 is studying Public 

Health at the Vale Graduate School. 
P 

Mona Adshead is working with her 
father. She recently purchased a green- 
house and is now growing flowers. 

Loren Sniff*, n '38 is working in the rose 
houses of F. R. Pierton at Tarrytown, 
N.V. 



Y.W.G.A. NOTES 



LONG RUNS CAUSE DEFEAT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
rush the pigskin over the Stripe, but 

failing in this, retorted to another drop- 
kick which fell short. 

The second half saw an entirely new 
team facing the Agates. Shepler, full- 
back, increased the score with another 
field goal before the quarter was far 
advanced, but the subs made no lengthy 
gains. Soon afterward they wire replaced 
by the first -string men, who likewise 
were thrown for losses and suffered a 
blinked punt before the completion of 
the game. In the meantime the Agates 
made substantial gains at intervals, but 
could not frame a consistent offensive. 

Cook made substantial gains for Aggie, 
his line-plunging lieing the most out- 
standing feature in the M.A.C. advances. 
Captain Amstein also played his usual 
effective game at tackle, while Howe and 
Thompson shared honors with Fall in 
advancing the ball for Williams. 
The summary. 

Mass. Aggies Williams 

McKittrick, re le, Callaghan 

Amstein, rt It, Packard 

Cartwright, rg lg. Anderson 

Mills, McAllister, c e, Nott 

Anderson, lg rg, l.awdcr 

Murdough, It rt. Rohrback 

Bowie. Rice, le re, Austin 

Cox, qb <|b, Fall 

Quinn, Tufts, rhb Ihb, Thompson 

Johnson, Mahoney, Ihb rhb, Howe 

Cook, fb tl>. R. Chase 

Touchdowns: Fall •-!. Points after 
touchdown: Howe 2. Coals from field: 

Howe. Shepler. Substitutions: Williams 
end, Tenney, Ballour, Davis, Mason; 

tackles, ('aider. Kellogg, Bianicley, Brown 
guards, Watson, Reid, Jones; (enter, 

Cunningham; backs, I'yle, Starr. Smith, 
Boynton, O. Chase. Eisner, Shepler. 
Referee: Young. UmpireKjolway. Lines- 
man; Whalen. Time: 1,"> minute quarters. 
I 



S. Tamada has returned to Japan where 

he will continue his "flori" work. 
p 

Si Doolittle is in the bridge construc- 
tion business with his father. 

P 

Wes Jones is working on rose houses 
for L. B. Coddington at Merry Hill, N.J. 

P 

Charlie Clagg, the proud owner of a 
very small turtle, complains that someone 
stole it out of the Alpha Gamma Rho 
punch bowl. Rumor has it that Ralph 
Hart is the one responsible for the das- 
tardly deed. Perhaps he feared for his dog. 

p 

The Alpha Sigs may miss Hcrbic 
Grayson's piano playing, but Canncy 
has been pledged and he brought his 

saxaphone. 

P 

Incidentally, Professor Waugh asked 
the Landscape 7"> class how many had 
studied music. He said, "Perhaps you 
have sluied piano for four years or 
iierhaps you play a saxaphone and know- 
nothing about music." 

According to Spike M alley, the CeJIsfMSJ 

is a worthy paper! 

P 

For those who have wondered and in- 
quired, following is an explanation why 
Ernie Sch mi dt always parks his car in 
exactly the same place in the field next 
the Phi Sig House-. It is thus given its 
choice cither of starting while rolling 
toward the brook or of taking the conse- 
quences. 

P 

We wonder if a certain co-ed has found 
out yet at what time the three o'clock 

train leaves. 

P 

John Kay has his eye on the Abbey, 
though as yet he has not dared ignore 
the- comments of his classmates and 

fraternity brothers. 
P 



At the fust meeting of the (.iris 
Athletic Association held in the- Abbe) 
Center recently, Elisabeth Steinbugler '30 

was elected assistant manager and secre- 
tary <>f the organization. Managers ol 
the different sports were also i hoscn that 
evening. They aie as follows: 

Track, Mary Ingrahani L'7; Tennis, 

Carolyn Dean'J '28; Basketball. Ruth 
Falk"* '29^ Soccer ,f Miriam Huss '29; 
Baseball4Catr*erine Mi Ka) '2'.'. 

M 

Thef Misses Lucy Street and Helen 
(lark of the Mi. Holyokc Y.W.CA. 
addressed the meeting of the VA\.( .A. 
(TM.A.C.last Sunday afternoon in French 
Hall.' Both girls have- been working dur- 
ing the" summer with Doctor GrenfeJ in 

Labrador and Newfoundland and told ol 
their experiences there. They illustrated 
their talk with slides and displays of 
articles which they brought back with 
them. 

OUTING CLUB FOR M.A.C. 



To the Collegian: 

Several students of M.A.C. have been 
formulating plans for an outing club for 
more than a year. These men have made 
inepiiries and have thought through many 
of the problems with which they have had 
to contend. They have finally reached a 
point where they are appealing to the 
rest of the students for support. 

College outing clubs are not new. Many 
colleges, Dartmouth for example, have 
very successful clubs. Dartmouth has a 
system of trails blazed all over the State 
of New Hampshire. At convenient inter- 
vals on these trails their Outing Club 
| U s ..instructed cabins, which will a. 

commodate several students at a time. 
A supply »f W«0d and a small stock of 
provisions are maintained at each camp. 
Those students who were present on 
Mount Toby last year on Mountain Day 
heard a representative of the Dartmouth 
Outing Club give a brief address. II. 
expressed a desire that this college start 
such a club and connect its trails with 
those of the Dartmouth Club. Of course 
a club here which will correspon.l to th.it 
of Dartmouth is comething of the luture, 
but a start can be made by constructing 
a cabin on Mount Toby which will 
ae commodate a large party at one time. 
With this cabin as a -tart others can be 
constructed from time to time. 

Walter E. South wie k '29 



Aleck Hodson says that formal dances 
are to be felt, not seen. Ask him what he 

means. 

P 

As leading man in the Aggie Revue, 
Bob Fox is now undeniably the apple of 

a co-ed's eve. 

P 

Ducky Swan is at his home in Milton, 

for a week's vacation. 

P 

Kelelie Bike '24 is head coach at the 
Natick High School, succeeding "Hubba" 
Collins, who is coaching now at ths 
Beverly High School. 

Freddie Bartlett '24, Malcolm Haskell 
'24, and "Dune" Hollingsworth '26, who 
are working for the U. S. Rubber Co., at 
Bristol, R. I., were here this week-end. 
P 

"Al" Mann is teaching at Iowa State 

College. 

P 

Charles Ross '25 is principal of t he- 
West minster High School. 
p 

Phil Walsh '2<>, has returned from a 
Mediterranean tour. 



AMSTEIN ELECTED 

(Continued from Page t) 
for "Gerry" Amstein 127. who was 
appointed acting-captain at the opening 
ol the season, was chosen captain by the 
letter men last Friday, 

Well-wishers of the M.A.C. team are 
hoping for the return to the backfield ol 
Johnson and llaertl, both of whom are 
suffering from injuries. 

The Fngineers will present a strong 
combination including Cuieli and Con- 
verse, star backs, whose work caused no 
little apprehension last year. The former 
is the posse-ssor of an educated toe, while- 
the later is a broken-field runner of no 
mean ability. 

The Worcester eleven will probably 
include Hubbard and Broker, ends; 
Huntington and Higgins, tackles; Shakour 
and Ileon, guards; Captain Lewis at 
center; Harrison or VVhittemore at quar- 
ter; Converse and Guidi, halfbacks; and 
Wilkinson at fullback. 



1 he fust Candle-Light service- i 
ducted according to the Standard Nati 
Y.W.CA. rules ever held at M.A.C. took 
place- in Memorial Hall, Sunday, Oct. In 
at eight o'clock. At this service thirtj 
freshman girls were- received into the 

association i 

lli. organisation as it now exists 

staildl to replace- the- Y.W.CA. which 

was abolished last year. Membership 
this year is limited to those- Interested in 

the Work of the Y.W.CA. instead ol il„ 
unlimited membership of the past year- 
The Candle-Light service is one ol the 
innovations which the new nvmbetl 

started. Almeela Walker '27 who ji 
president of the association presided g| 
the services. Many of the- faculty womtl 
attended. 

I WO- YEARS LOSE 

THEIR FRIST GAM 



•Red" Ball's Two-Year football team 
lost its first game e>f the season to the 
Conn, Aggie freshmen here last Friday hy 
a score of 25-7. he T Two- Years made tin 
first score on a forty-yard drive after tin 
kick-off, Butters carrying the hall screw 
The try for point was made when Conn, 
was off-side. The first Connecticut talk 
was made- on a forty-yard march after 
the recovery of a Two- Year fumble. In 
the second period Connecticut Scored 
again when Shea broke through the Two- 
Year line for fifteen yards. Neither team 
was able to make much progress in tht 
third peri.d but in the fourth, Connee tii in 
scored twice; once after two complete.] 
forwards and a rush from the one yard 
line, and again as a result of fumbling 
and recovering over the goal line. Tht 
Two-Year line played a gtxxl elcfensive 
game, but the team was kept on dangerous 
ground most of the time because of poor 
punting. Kelley's line plunging feature] 
the Two- Year attack while Turco play.. I 
a good game for the visitors. 
The summary: 

C.A.C. Two- Year 

C.abel, le re. Butlei 

Streter, It rt, Warren 

Kutkcss, lg rg, VOung 

Strangle, c c. Te-U 

Walker, rg lg NHhw 

Hawkins, rt It. Puhife 

SlosslK-rg. re le. Che* 

l.amoureaux, qb qb, Holland 

McCaffrey. Ihb rhb, Butte -i- 

Shea, rhb Ihb, Burr,! 

Turco, fb B>. KeHej 

Referee: Regan. Umpire: Salman. 

Head linesman: Couhig. Time: two 12 
and two HI minute pe ri ods. 



FOOTBALL 
AMHERST vs. MASS. AGGIE 

Alumni Field, Saturday, October '■>" 
< inane called at 2 p. m. ( ieneral adir - 
$1.0(1. Reserved seats #1 extra or s_ .id' 

Application for re ser ved seats must U 

accompanied by check or money order 
payable- to Curry S. Hicks, C'*mri 
Manager of Athletics. Tickets uiil M 
issued in the order of receipt of appli< i""" 
If you desire good seats you must apprj 
early. Please state if you wish scats ' 
Mass. Aggie or Amherst side of field. '' 
you wish tickets by registered mail i le'* 
add 15 cents. 



Emil Corwin '25 is with the Strathmore 

Paper Company. 

' 1» 

Let) Novick '2(5 is doing landscape work 

in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

p 

"Lewie" Keith '25. who is assistant to 

the Miami Park commissioner, Miami, 

Fla.. telegraphed that his home- was 

ruined in the recent severe storm, but 

that he is (). K. 

P — - 

"Bay" Seedham '2ii is In partnership 
in New York, with Metrton Perry ol 

Amherst, in the sale of "exclusive apparel 

for the college man." 

P — 

Marion Cassidy '-'*i is at the Wellesley 
( Graduate School. 



DRUM'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 

Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



Photos of students have been attached 
to all enrollment papers at Toledo I nive-r 
sity. The idea is to make it easier fa 
professors to identify the students. 



Yale has cancelled its thirty inter 
collegiate hockey contests on th. 
1<)27 schedule. This was ann.>un<<<: 
when it was learned that the new bockfl 
arena now uneler construction would no! 
be completed this fall. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south c»l" campus. 
Telephone 511 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

RADIO RADIO RADIO 

RADIO RADIO RADIO 

RADIO RADIO RADIO 

RADIO RADIO RADIO 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight S2 X 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight M** 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Penntex" is made only by "<>»>* 



G. Edward Fisher 



$ 



CASH IN ON VALUE 
You will find our Fall Goods have splendid appeal. Let "Tom" show you imported wans 
that are really worth while. Ayres and Smith Caps Welsh -Marmot son Haberdashery. 

□ THE HOUSE OF WALSH □□□□□□□□□□□□□ A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



$ 



Discriminating "Aggie" men 



BUY THEIR 



SHOES 
GOLF HOSE 
SWEATERS 
SHIRTS and 
TIES 



— : AT :— 



GINSBURG'S 

19 PLEASANT ST. 



TOTAL ENROLLMENT 

OF COLLEGE PUBLISHED 



Figures Show Teital of M7 Suidents 
in Pour Year Course. 



I he report from the Registrar's < Mim 
shows ili.u there are 527 four \< at stu 

dents registered for the fall te i I»20, 

I be number ol -i udents in each class is &■ 

follows : 

Men II omen 
Seniors 77 hi 

f union x>i 21 

Sophomores 1 15 :to 

I reshmen i.io :;;, 



I.". I 



<M> 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



Special Exhibit at 
adams hall 

Monday Eve., Oct. 25 

6.30 to 7.M) o'clock 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Holyokc, Mass. 



-College Candy Kitchen- 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



. 



Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refresh 
ments and Sodas, Salted Nuts 

Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes 
Ready to be Mailed 



SMOKES; OF^ALL KINDS 
IcTCrearrT^fofTour Fraternifjr Affairs" 

Do Not Forget} That Special 
SUNDAY NIGHT SUPPER 



a 



The College Candy Kitchen 

the place for the college man" 



Start Your College Year Right 

By Making The 

{Boston iEurntng ©ranHrript 



Your 
READING HABIT 



Its School and College Sport 
Pages 

Its School and College News 

are the best and most complete in 
all New England 



A Newspaper Printing the Things that the 

Student in School and College 

Should Read 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



You Are Absolutely Certain 



I own Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

Mattes* 

< oo. 

I \ i tillliS 
7. <0 



Friday 

.1.00 
».4.V 8..<0 



Saturday 



S.45 S.3S 



"Till I' \IS\I \KIK ' nllh 
I ■ n. > • i ml. . U nil. mi 

Colli, , ii * Georgia ll»l». 

\ sitimi; rt-.l nii\ii \i.w 

I I llll. I « Oil I III' M|lfl I.I, II 

l.triv colorful back-around 
■ i i .H ■ track, Matk an hon- 
ky-tonk, i iijinn tornado, 
.nul .i « iiii ,i.'s|,, i.,t, itrh - 
Inii for low tinil napplntM 

■i mi author tamoui fur 
■la In in. in ttortaa <■! race- 
track .mil prill' i inn 

Charlea Chapll .1 < 

real Coined) . "A IMK.H 
I •! 1 ■ r ii lil ••.. .s. Newa 



tdolph Mi'iijnu 111 \ NO. 
CIAI (III UK II V with 
Chea t er Conklta uml Lou lea 
Brooke . Lot Mealou trim 
■was tin' aid Sreuc h m the 
in, k«<i<><iN b arber who t.iki-H 

New York I lii-li nih lct> i>> 
■tara ami wlnn thi'itlrl ami 

a fortaae. 

Sportllahi "Ban g, Bat," 

.' Ki'ri Censed) 



"ROLLING IKIMI •• 
Kt-iiliiali! Denny In our ol 
bin I uniilrm and l»i-si com- 
riiii-.N ui hi* career, it 'none 

lontt laugh from In uliinhiii 
In t-ittl. hnhhllnit over with 
ilu- spn-il and firs Inn".-, of 
inn- of the hlitftrHt laimli- 
makert In the game. 

1 Ki'fl < laoneda 




™, -11" •'..';'•.'..•,','>':' 



In the Rough 

Everyone gets in the rough 
sometimes in life as in golf. 
And about the worst "rough" 
is illness or accident. 
When you run into that, 
you'll appreciate the help of a 
good life insurance contract. 
If you're disabled more than 
a few weeks, our life contract 
pays a monthly income until 
vou recover. In addition, 
you're relieved of paying pre- 
miums and your insurance is 
kept in force. 
Circular 822 explains it. 
Write for copy. 

Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company 

ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 TeJ. GreenrieM 1X73 M 

Greenfield, Mass. 




Good taste and good health 
demand sound teeth and 
sweet breath. 

The use of Wrigleys chew- 
ing gum after every meal takes 
care of this important item of 
personal hygiene in a delight- 
nil, refreshing way — by clear- 
ing the teeth of food particles 
and by helping the digestion. 

The result is a sweet breath that 
■hows care for one's self and con- 
sideration for others — both marks 
of refinement. 

GUI 



WHIG LEYS 

^3 bandy packs 5^ 



— -Jr"*urT] 
!"wsur>7 djjrrk /«»» «v 



of getting a new overcoat when you buy at BOLTER'S. We never carry over an overcoat or a sheepskin from one veir 

to another. This has been our policy, for years 

EXETER CARL. H. BOLTER HYANMS 

AMHERST 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20, 1926 






You will titiil in eicetlunt 

. . . hum kkpairim; shop ... 

equipped with the nioul up-to-date (ioodyear 

Muchlnery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PAKLOK 

at Hi Amity St.. Op*>. New Useatrs 

W* understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guarontffd Hhoei shtned and dyed. §0 
VINCENT CKANOONICO. l'rop. 

The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Th* SetccJUL Start 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 
prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up ©»• tight) 

Oculists Prescription! Filled. Broke* lensest 

accurately replaced 

lilt; BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 
NEW I'RICES 
Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - 
Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - • 
Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels 

Men's Half Soles 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P.M. 



12.55 

1.75 
2.25 



WELCOME TO AGGIE STUDENTS! 

We have already in stock the most up-to- 
date Oxfords for college wear, also we have 
ilished .i shea repsirtns depa r t w an t la con- 
nection with our regular shoe store. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, M*„ 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Pellcy Guaranty 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post (»(Ji lt 



Informal Days Are Near- 

You'll eniov the social times ahead far more if your haberdashery and clothing come from 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 






Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Kodaks Keep The Story 
Kodaks— Brownies— Film Packs. 

Developing Printing Enlarging-Quality work 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



WE ARE READY 
for 

HALLOWE'EN 

ARE YOU? 

Tallies. Place Cards, 
Stickers, etc. 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

M. A. C. Stationery 

Fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST, MASS. 



"BOSTONIANS" 

Their character, their individuality of 

style — that's what makes Bostonians 

the correct College Shoe .... 

Come in Look 'em over 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



It will Be Cooler for the Game! 

ARE YOU PREPARED? 
Windbreakers, Sweaters, Overcoats. 
Steamer Rugs are seasonable sug- 
gestions. We can show you the 
latest designs and styles in these and 
can save you money. 




Camels made cigarettes 
the popular smoke 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

How about that Fall Suit? 



THROUGH sheer quality, through 
a never before known smoking en- 
joyment, Camels won the world to 
cigarettes. Camel was the first and 
only cigarette that combined all the 
goodnesses of the choicest Turkish 
and Domestic tobaccos, and Camel 
became the greatest smoke word of 
all ages. No tobacco name com- 
pares with Camel. 

Camel won and holds its over- 
whelming preference through in- 
domitable tobacco quality. Only the 
choicest Turkish and Domestic 



tobaccos are rolled into Camels. 
These fine tobaccos receive the 
skilful blending that only the 
world's largest tobacco organiza- 
tion could give. Nothing is too 
good or too expensive that will 
make Camels, regardless of price, 
die utmost in cigarettes. 

If you have never yet tried 
Camels, a new sensation in smok- 
ing pleasure awaits you. The sen- 
sation of the choicest, the most 
perfectly blended tobaccos that 
money can buy. Have a Camel! 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALBM, N. C. 



n 192-; 



FREE 

CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

{SUPPLY LIMITED) 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



Slip MuBBtXl^MtttB (flotlgfltfltt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 1926 



N 



Welcome For Alumni 

On Home-Coming Day 

Amherst Game and Fraternity Reunions Expected to Attract 

Many. 



The Program: 
10 a. in. to 112 m. Visits with Coflaga De- 
partments. 
12. 30 to 1.16 p. m. Cafeteria luncheon 

at Draticr Hall. 
.'.(Ml to 4.30 p. in.— Football. Amherst \s. 

M.AC, on Alumni Field. Game 

called promptly at 2 p. m. 
1.30 to 11 p. in. — Fraternity receptions to 

Alumni at the fraternity houses. 

Recreation and dancing at Memorial 

Hall. 
There it is! Now all that we need are 
\ou alumni. Will Aggie win? Come and 
>ee for yourself. Lend your support. 
Over 200 alumni reservations have al- 
ready been made for the game. That is 
the Old Aggie spirit. Add your name to 
the list. 

Come and talk your problems over 
with your former professors. Remember 
that the morning hours will find the 
College Departments waiting to welcome 
you. 

The following fraternities have arranged 
for house dances for the evening hours to 
which alumni are invited: Alpha Gamma 
Rho, Alpha Sigma Phi, Kappa Fpsilon, 
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, 
O.T.V., Sigma Phi Fpsilon, and Theta 
Chi. 

Phi Sigma Kappa will hold a fraternity 
-moker and Delta Phi Ciamma will enter- 
tain the returning alumnae at Draper 
Hall. 

Be sure to register in Memorial Hall 
upon your arrival. Tickets for the game 
may also be secured at Memorial Hall 
during Saturday morning. 



Index Photographs 

Soon to be Complete 

Remaining Group Pictures will be 
Taken on First Two Sundays of 
November. 



Remaining group pictures for the Index 
will not be taken this week, but will lie 
scheduled after Sunday Chapel the first 
two Sundays in November. Schedules 
will be printed in the Collegian and 
prominently displayed so that all who 
read may see. No further postponements 
will be allowed except with the consent 
of the editor or the photographic editor. 
Heads of the various student organiza- 
tions are asked to have as many of their 
groups present as is possible. 

Albert LaPrise '28 has charge of the 
sale of all group pictures, including class 
pictures, and all who desire any of these 
groups should place their orders with him. 

Photographs of members of the junior 
class have nearly all been taken, but any 
|>ersons who have not yet had a sitting 
or have not been satisfied with the result, 
-hould see the photographic editor to 
arrange for a sitting. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



'Worry does no good, it changes 

nothing. 
Today's best should he tomorrow'* 

starting point." 



Thursday — 
3.48 Assembly: Charles 11. Could, 
1916. 
Friday — 
•3.00 Freshman Football: Two- Year. 
Varsity Cross-Country: Amherst, 

there. 
6.46 Parade leaves Q.T.Y. 
7.00 Mass Meeting: Stockbridge Hall 
\-'tt> Delta Phi (lamina Dance: 
Memorial Building. 
Saturday— Home-Coming Day. 
-""Varsity Football: Amherst. 
S 'x-Man Rope Pull. 
House- Dances: Q.T.Y., Kappa 
Sigma, Theta Chi, Sigma Phi 
Kpsilon, Lambda Chi Alpha, 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Gamma 
Kho, Kappa Kpsilon. 
Wednesday — 
■ reshman Football: Williston, there. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

ENJOY FIRST PARTY 



Music for First Faculty Dance of 
Year Furnished by Bates Collegians. 



The first of the series of Faculty 
P irties, which are held regularly during 
the college year, took place last Friday 
evening in the Memorial Building. A 
good number were present, all of whom 
enjoyed the music furnished by Hates' 
Collegians. These faculty parties, which 
are held at intervals of a month, are 
usually in the form of dances, and are 
enjoyed by many iihiiiIhis of the College 
staff. Prof, and Mrs. Hulx-rt Yount have- 
been elected as new meniliers of the 
faculty party committee. Professor W'augh 
is to be the chairman of the committee 
for the next dance. 



Two- Year Grid Team 

Suffers Second Defeat 



Injury of Star Back Heavy Handicap 

to Losers. 



The Two-Year football team lost to 
Yermont Academy here last Friday by a 
s<-<>re of 19-0. The Two- Years started well 
but the removal of Kelley in the first 
quarter with a dislocated shoulder slowed 
up the team's offense and Yermont forged 
ahead. 

Vermont's first touchdown was made 
after the recovery of a fumble on the 
Two- Year one yard line shortly after the 
beginning of the second quarter. They 
scored again in the third period when a 
short punt gave them the ball on the 
Two-Year 20-yard line, and their last 
touchdown was made in the fourth 
quauer on a drive from the 30-yard line. 
They missed the first two tries for point 
but made the last one on a forward pass. 

The summary: 



Vermont 

I-eClair,le 
Davis, It 
Conlin, Ig 
Smolnecky, c 
Hiltunen, rg 
Sonsire, rt 
Cart tier, re 



Aggie Two- Year 

re, Burrill 
rt, Nilsson 
rg, Young 
c, Warren 

Ig, Smith 
It, Pulsifer 

le, Chase 



(Continued on Pag* i> 

M.A.C. GIRLS WORK 

TO GET EDUCATION 



Figures Show Large Percentage of 
Co-eds Work During Summer. 



Many of the girls who attend M.A.C. 
are working through their summer vaca- 
tions to make their education possible. 
It is interesting to note the various 
types of work undertaken, and the 
amounts earned. The following table 
does not include records of girls who 
were in business for themselves, or who 
worked less than four weeks. 

No. Type Are. No.of Ave.Amt.of 

of of 

Girls Work 

15 Waitress 

Ci Agriculture. 

4 Playground Dir'tor* 

4 tien. Housework 

3 (are of Children 

1 Camp Councillor 

1 Clerk in store 

1 Proof Reader* 

1 Mill Operative* 

1 Clerical Work in 

Office* 'i 102 in 

Total amount earned by 

87 girls 64400 BJ 

Average amount earned 

per girl SI 19. 11 

Average numl>er weeks these 

37 girls worked ... 8 

Except in occupations starred (*), 
board and room was usually received 
also. In some cases carfare had to conic 
out of the total, but for the most part the 
cash received was clear gate. The above 
amounts are in addition to whatever 
earnings may be possible during term 
time. 



Weeks 


Cash 


Worked 


Received 


10 


$130. 


10 6-6 


127 


* 


85.60 


134 


105.75 





97. 


s 


7"). 


10 


120 r 


13 


ISO. 





108. 



All sophomore competitors for 
the 1029 Index Hoard should re 
poti at the Index office in the 
Memorial Building at 7. .'10 o'clock 
on Thursday evening, October 28. 



Aggie Revue PIan8 

Now Nearly Complete 

Work on Movie Progressing. Other 
Acts to be Put on by Various Classes. 



The results of the first four or live- 
films of the motion picture on Aggie life, 
which is to be used as a part of tin- 
Aggie Revue program, have proven so 
good that the Roister Doistcis are going 
ahead with the protect The photographic 
work is Uing done by A. Rodger Chamber- 
lain. 

It is expected that the freshman class 
will contribute a one act play. The com- 
mit t»i' which will Ik? in charge is as follow s: 
Eric Singleton of Brooklyn, N.Y., chair- 
man; A. Richards Daniels of Dedham, 
John Jacobson of North Dartmouth, 
Stuart II. Potter of Framingham, and 
Alfred II. Woodcock of Daytona Beach, 
Florida. Two or three other acts will In- 
given by the three upper classes or various 
talented individuals in them. 



'5C 



jr 5 



Agates' Victorious Drive 

Overcomes Worcestc I i -O 

M.A.C. Eleven Shows Scoring Power in First Victory ~. ...ason. 

Rivals Clearly Outplayed. 



AGGIE TEAM READY 
FOR AMHERST CLASH 

Old Rivals Meet Saturday to Decide 
Town Championship. Both Elevens 
Will Present Strong Lineups. 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

KEEPS SLATE CLEAN 

Victor Over Wesleyan for First Time 
in Four Years. 



The cross-country team defeated the 
Wesleyan harriers here for the first time 
in four years last Friday by a score of 
24-33. Captain Newton :>f Wesleyan 
finished first in the time of 27 minutes, 
2.5 seconds. Preston of M.A.C. was 
second and Biron sprinted near the finish 
to pass Parkinson of Wesleyan and take 
third. Nottebaert of M.A.C. finished the 
race running on only one shoe, having 
lost the other when less than half way 
around I he course. 

This is the second win over the Wes- 
leyan harriers in the five years that 
Coach Derby's tea;««s have competed 
against them. The last victory was in 
1922 by a score of 26-29. Since then 
Wesleyan has won three races, in two of 
which they led by only one |X)int. 

The next race scheduled in on October 
29 with Amherst on the Amherst course. 
It is the next to the last race before t In- 
New Knglands and a win will we the 
Aggie harriers conquerors over all the 
Little Three. 

The order at the finish was as billows: 

Newton (W), Preston (M), Hiron (M;, 
Parkinson (W), Snell (M), Henneherry 
(M), Mead (W), Swan (M), Crooks (If), 
Turtle (W), Harrison (W), Iritcher (\\), 
Hatt (W '), Notteliaert (M). 



COLLEGE JUDGING TEAMS 

DO WELL AT DETROIT 



M.A.C. Aggregation Ranked Above 
All Other New England Colleges 
Competing. 



The Dairy Cattle and Dairy Product! 
judging teams made a very creditable 
showing at Detroit, October 6 and 7. 
As a matter of fact their scores were 
higher than those made during the past 
five or six years. The Dairy Cattle 
judging team won 8th place out of 27 
teams and the Dairy Products team was 
11th out of 13 teams. Kenneth W. 
Milligan '27 of State Line won fourth 
place in judging all breeds and fifth in 
Guerneys. Richard C. Foley '27 of 
Portland, Maine, was fourth in Jerseys. 

The teams were composed of Richard 
Foley, Kenneth Milligan, and Clarence- 
H. Parsons '27 of North Amherst. The 
two teams were coached by Mr. Merrill 
J. Mack, Instructor in Dairying. It is 
of interest to note that the Mass. Aggies 
ranked above all the other New Kngland 
colleges which were represented. The 
University of Maine was tenth and the 
Connecticut Aggies ami the I'nivcrsity 
of New Hampshire were below the first 
twenty. 



Next Saturday the M.A.C. football 
team meets its town rival, the Amherst 
eleven, in what is perhaps, the hardest 
assignment of the season for the Agates. 
Tin- game will be played <>n Alumni Field, 
where "the little red machine" of 1024 
triumphed over the Salninas, 17 to 7. 
I .ist year Amherst's phenomenal aggre- 
gation was victorious on its own scalping 
grounds by a 27 to 0- count. 

The Amherst -Aggie- scries includes 34 
games, extending from 1881, with the 
exception of a prolonged |x>riod from M107 
to 1921 when no hostilities on the gridiron 
were scheduled. Amherst has won 24 of 
the contests which have taken place, 
while M.A.C. has won 6 and lied 4. Since 
the resumption of the annual town battle 
in 1921, two of the five games played 
have been Mass. Aggie victories. 

The Lord Jeffs, somewhat slow in 
reaching their power, have hit their 
stride, if one may judge from the 20 to 
defeat handed to Wesleyan. Captain 
Cadigan is the out standing ball -carrier 
among "the Little Three" at present, and 
with Priddy and W. Packer, forms a 
IHiwerful backfield, which has been 
further strengthened by the development 
of Creden as quarterback. The Amherst 
line is equally dangerous. 

The Agates, although held to one 
touchdown by Worcester Tech last week, 
prevented the Converse-! iuidi combina- 
tion from scoring, a feat which the 1924 
and 1926 elevens failed to accomplish. 
Tufts and Mahoney, suiiHlitute halfbacks, 
furnished thrills for the spectators at 
the Tech contest, and may be given a 
'Continued on Pag* 2) 



Floriculture Club 

Holds First Meeting 



Officers for Coming Year 
Pickens Chosen President. 



Elected. 



MASS MEETING 



Friday Night. Parade starts at 
8.46 at the Q.T.V House. Movie-. 
Mr. M. J. Bria« will lead the 
singing. "Kid" Core will speak. 
Let's Go! 



On October 21 the Floriculture Club 
held its first meeting of the year. This 
club is composed of all those who arc 
interested in Floriculture and holds its 
meetings regularly throughout the year 
with frequent addresses by various people. 
The first meeting was largely devoted to 
getting organised for the coming year. 
The following officers were elected: 
president, Herman K. Pickens '27; vice- 
president, Samuel S. Pealiody Two- 
Year '27; treasurer, Harold K. Stewart 
Two- Year '27, secretary, Miss Miriam 
ii. Huss '29. The following committees 
were elected: program committee, Paul 
F. Frese '28 chairman; Miss Olive Allen 
'28 and Rolx-rt F. Ilallbourg Two- Year 
'27; refreshment committee, William K. 
Kelly Two- Year '27 chairman; Miss 
Olive Allen '28 anel Miss Joan Hancock 
Two-Year '28. 



Issue of Inkhorne 

Will be Continued 



Organization of Those Interested 
in Publication Already Under Way. 



The Inkhorne, which made its first 
ap|*-araine on the- campus last spring, 
will lie continued this year. The men's 
group, which is working along the same 
lines as last year, held its first meeting 
two weeks ago with Professor Charles 
H. Patterson. The girls' group, which 
was recently organized along similar 
lines, met last Tuesday evening at t he- 
home of Professor I- rank Prentice Kami. 

All students who are- interested in 

creative- writing and who desire- further 
informal ion shoulel bet in touch with 
Edward A. ' ooaeil '27, Elladora K. 

I luthsteiner '27 or Professor Rand as 
~.<x>n as possibles. 



"Kid" Gores l!»20 eleven, displaying 
Us fust consistent s|H-e-el and driving 
power of the season, game-reel its first 
victory by a score of 7 to at 1 In- ex|>ense 
Of Worcester Tech on Alumni Field last 

Saturday. The visitors prescntccl ■ fast, 

bill light combination which could neither 
OOpa with the Aggie atlae k nor formulate 

a sustained offensive. 

The- only tally of I he game i.mic in the 
■ « onel |ieiioel when Mahoney, by a series 
of end-runs, following his run-back of | 
Worcester punt, finally placed the- oval 
beyond the goal line. Cartwright then 
successfully lifted a placement kick be- 
tween the uprights. 

The Lngineers, following the recovery 
of an Aggie fumble, thrcatene-d to dupli- 
cate- the leal in (he third session. Converse 
punted to the M.A.C. iVyard line, and 
the ball was mishandled hut eventually 
held by Mahoney. The latter saved the 
day on the next play, when he retrieved 
the leather which started to roll towards 
the end sone after Iwing passed tu a 
backfield which wasn't there. "Red" 
then retaliated with a short kick which 
went off-side on the 211- yard mark, but 
the Engineers failed to utilise this opor- 
t unity when a |>erfect pass was dropited. 

In the final period the visitors also 
started a march for the Aggie goal in 
which a series of short passes from Gil! 
to Guidi were especially helpful in ad- 
vancing the ball. At this point, "Bob" 
Bowie- prevented a (xjssible Tech tally by 
deflecting the oval from the hands of a 
waiting Engineer who had a clear field 
to a touchdown. The closing minutes ol 
the game saw llaertl, Tufts, and Cook 
carry the leather back to midfield. 

Neither eleven showed a concentrated 
attack early in the game, although memo- 
ries of last year's "little red machine" 
came to the minds of onlookers as Cook 
and the wedge plowed through the 
visiting line for three successive downs. 
Tech relied mainly on the punting of Gill 
to compensate for the Aggie gains. 

Mahoney, aided by good interference 
and effective- line play, covered 21) yards 
off- tackle during the march toward a score 
in the next peri«*l, mmJ. skirted hoth e-nds 
before reaching his destination. 

Converse entered the contest at this 
stage, but a poor pan from center caused 
him to hesitate anel run backwards, where 
In- was nailed, 20 yards behind the- line 
of scrimmage. He subsequently redeemed 
himself with several short sallies anel 
excellent punting. 

The passing of the Agates was not up 
to the standard set in earlier games, but 
the elusiveness of Tufts and Mahoney, 
combined with the line bin king of Cook, 
furnished a creditable substitute-. Loose 
handling of the ball was the outstanding 
we-akness. Captain Amstein and Loth 
end, Bowie and McKittrick, were very 
effective, as was the whole line. 

The flashincss of Converse-, and the 
stellar elefensive work of Cuidi ami 
Captain Lewis were the outstanding 
features of the Engineers' play. The 
lineup: 

Mass. Aggie Worcester Tech 

Howie-, le re, Freeman, Query Morgan 

Murdough, It rt, lliggins, Huntington 
Anderson, Hlack, Ig rg, Tojx-lian 

Mills, c ( , Lewis 

Cartwright, rg Ig, Heon, Shakour 

Amstein, rt It, Finney, Lestor 

Me Kittriek, re- le, Hubbard, Graham 

Cox, qb qb, Whittemore 

Mahonev, llae:rtl, Ihb rhb, Cill, Converse 
Tufts, llaertl, rhh Ihb, Cuidi 

Cexjk, fb fb, Wilkinson 

Touchdown: Mahoney. Point after 
touchdown: Cartwright. Referee-: A. G. 
Johnson. Umpire: A. W. Ingalls. Lines- 
man: J. H. Whalen. Time: four I.", 
minute- periods. 



OPPONENTS SCORES 



Amherst 20, Wesleyan 
Springfield 24, V II 14 
Vermont 1 1, Tufts 13 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. OCT. 27, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, I'uplished every 
\\Ydnesday by the students. 



HOARD OF EDITORS 



William L. Dolb '27 
Ellsworth Baknaru '2k 



Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Kditoi 



ideals of the National Athletic Associa- 
tion than varsity competition because of 
their social values, liecausc they do not 
neglect the masses, and because the 
competition is not sufficiently intensive 
to be physically harmful'." 
It sounds like a lawn party. 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Ed it„ri.,l WILLIAM L. DflU V 

Athletirs llARoi.i) E. CLAM "M 

Paninu* New* lUM U BWMCBi |28 

tampusiNew. VVllUAM r. Phinnbv "H 

Louisa T. lUca "-"» 

Fatuity & Short CounM KuwabdII.N is'-"» 

Intercollegiate Editor Franc ks ( . Baud *» 
Co- Ed News Josephine I'anzica '2K 



PERSONALS 



BVSINFSS OIl'ARTMENT 

Chaklks F < lac.c '27 Business HiMIK 

Liwtfl II Whitakm 27 Advertising Msnaeei 

JThn E. White '27 < >" Illation Manager 

Do-'GLAS W. LOMHQ '2H 

Edwin A. Wilder '2k 

Harold K. Ansei.l '29 

Lawrence A. t arrith '29 

William A. Ecan 29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sing e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

"Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at spe™' rate 
of postage provided for in section ,110. .Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



COURTESY 

Certain of the students at Mass. Aggie 
have been obnoxious lately by giving 
audible utterance to remarks which are 
not complimentary, to say the least, and 
in most cases highly 'embarassing to the 
women of the college. Two years ago 
considerable furor was aroused by a very 
direct censure of this practice, but we 
feel that we do not need direct our re- 
marks quite as openly. We merely wish 
to call to the attention fo the offenders, 
their shortcoming; and we believe that 
they will readily take the hint. 

All of you are part °* Mass. Aggie, 
and you should realize by this time, some 
of the things that the college stands for. 
Among other things, the college is sup- 
posedly made up of men and women. It 
is certainly a miserable kind of man who 
allows himself to be rude to the members 
of the opposite sex in this disconcerting 
fashion. This practice is void of all 
suggestion of consideration for others, 
the fundamental consideration in good 
breeding, proper decorum, and social 

grace. 

"A word to the wise is sufficient." 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

A Princeton alumnus writes to Bill 
Ro^-r, suggesting that he continue in 
pioneer work in football policies, by 
doing away with coaches during the name. 
This docs not sound very compliment. iry 

to Roper. 

* * * * 

(By New Student Service)— "Social life 
at Ottawa I'nivcrsity, Kansas, moves 
along without the aid of (.reek letter 
fraternities. The substitute is 'Sccial 
Groups'. The student body is divided 
into sections ot thirty-five or forty for 
social pur|H)ses. The division is 'not 
arbitrary', but alOBg the lines of 'natural 
congeniality and of friendship already 
existing.' No rituals or insignias are 
permitted, and there are no intercollegiate 
affiliations." 

Ottawa must have a iH-ruliar rushing 

season. 

* * * * 

University of Sidney, Australia, Oxford, 
and Cambridge debating teams have 
started on a tour throughout the I'nited 
States and Canada. We wonder if this 
is a preseason training trip. 

* * * * 

(New York City, By New Student 
Service.) — "Whether women's team- 
should OTMBpetC in intercollegiate games 
is a question that will come before the 
Athletic Association of American College 
women next spring. College women the 
nation over are divided on the question, 
some preferring to continue the rule now 
in force prohibiting competition while 
others would encourage varsity games. 

"Western colleges generally support 
the present rule, while the Eastern insti- 
tutions, esiiecially Cornell Cniversity, 
are for a change." 

Have you ever heard of the ennserva- 

tive East? 



EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

This editorial is inlended primarily for 
the niemliers of the class of 1980 but all 
undergraduates will do well to give it a 
pasting moment. Freshmen, during the 
six weeks which you have already s|K-nt 
on the campus, you should have begtW to 
grasp some understanding of what a 
college education is all about. You un- 
doubtedly realize that a college educa- 
tion has its responsibilities as well as its 
pleasures. You are now organized as a 
dass with no outstanding individuals. 
What you may have been in high school 
is of very little significance now. You 
are all starting on your college career 
from the same level, hut some will advance 
more rapidly than others. Four years 
from now will you be one of the leaders, 
or will you Ik- submerged with the tail- 
enders? This question is entirely up to 
you and only you can answer it. 

You have had an opportunity to meet 
the leaders of the ttpDCV classes. You 
have also doubtless noticed that these 
students are actively engaged in extra- 
curricular activities as well as studies. 
They have come to college to learn not 
only from books but also from associations 
and connections with their fellow students. 
The best way of gaining an acquaintance 
with your fellow classmates is through 
athletics, academic, activities, committees, 
publications and the like. 

The question now arises as to which 
activity is the t>est. The answer varies 
with the individual according to his own 
abilities. Athletics form an outlet for 
the physically fit, publications for the 
literary inclined, musical clubs for the 
musicians and singers, debating for the 
politicians, and dramatics for those who 
prefer acting. It is up to you to decide 
what to do, but if you are wise you will 
go at once and become affiliated with 
that line of work which appeals to you 
the most. Whatever you undertake, keep 
plugging at it regardless of the obstacles 
which may confront you. Perseverance 
will often enable you to reach as high a 
place as natural ability will ever put you. 
Kven though during the course of your 
freshman year you fail to reach a position 
of outstanding importance, do not yield 
to the temptation which spells defeat for 
so many. Show your classmates that you 
are not a quitter, and honors will come 
to you unexpectedly. 

However, there are certain precaution^ 
which must ha guarded against. Outside 
activities m.e\ DS easily overdone. You 
cannot do everything at once. It is Utter 
to concentrate your efforts on one or two 
than to try to half do four or rive. In 
unity there is strength. Success in one 
is better than failure in several. You 
■hottld not devote too much time to 
extra-curricular activities for after all the 
main reason for coming to college is to 
study. Activities and studies go hand in 
hand. You cannot Ik- a success by de- 
voting all your time to one. One serves 
as a relish for the other, and unless they 
are taken together, they are hot ^worth- 
less.. 

With this in mind go in and show 
your classmates, your friends, and your 
professors what vou have in you. 

K. L, S. 



"Joe" Cormier 'liti is studying lands* a|>e 
gardening at the Harvard I iraduate 

School. 

-V 

Kvelyn Davis '98 is teaching at the 

Bellows Falls High School, and Maude 
Bosworth is teaching in Frie, Pa. 
P 



IN ARCTIC SEAS 



AT THE ABBEY 



The following letter from "Bob" 
Woodworth '24, interesting in its scicn 
t i In content and its contagious enthusi- 
asm, was received a few days alter the 
opening of the fall term and it is with 
pleasure that I pass it on to a wider 
audience. K.h. I . 



"Already the western schools are pre- 
paring const tut live' equivalents for 
women from intercollegiate competition. 
On October 30, Mills College, Stanford 
University and the Cniversity of Cali- 
fornia will meet for a play day. The 
nature of play day games has not been 
divulged, but its proponents insist that 
they will l>c 'more in keeping with the 



AGGIE TEAM READY 
(Continued from Parte 1) 

chance against the visitors, although 
Johnson, who has been kept on the 
bench since the Williams game as a result 
of a leg injury, and (Juinn, who has been 
suffering with a cold, are likely to have 
first call. The return to active service of 
Black makes doubly certain the presence 
of dependable guards. 

The I.ord Jeffs will be a slight favorite 
at the start of the contest but "Kid" 
Core's eleven is continually improving, 
and will give Amherst no end of trouble, 
if not I defeat The probable Aggie 
lineup will Ik- the same as that which took 
part in the Worcester game with the 
addition of Johnson. Ilaertl, and (Juinn 
in the backficld. Amherst will probably 
present its first -string team of Morse 
and Walker, ends; Hickett and Shank- 
wiler, tackles; Smith and Miller, guards; 
Richardson, center; Priddy and \Y. 
Parker at halfback; Creden at quarter- 
back; and Captain Cadigan at fullback. 



Mac Cummings has bought and "reno- 
vated" Elmer Barbar'e Kwar. 

P 

I.ouis Brandt '10 is located at Fulford, 
Florida, where he is landscape architect 
on several large estate developments. 

P 

Orman Street, formerly graduate assis- 
tant in agronomy, has gone to the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, where he will continue 
his studies. 

P 

Edward Strack '19, manager of the 
Farmer's Co-operative Exchange of 
Framingham Center, is studying "Feeds 
and Production" at the schools of the 
Purina Mills, St. Louis, Mo. 

P 

"Frieda" Jensen '26 is a chemist for 
Proctor and Cable, Ivorydale, Ohio. 

P 

Johnnie Temple '26 is a graduate assis- 
tant at the Harvard Medical School. 

P 

Following is an extract from a letter 
from J. Garry Curtis '07, of Miami, Fla. 
"Six Aggie men were in Miami during the 
recent hurricane and all of them encoun- 
tered thrilling experiences. Myron Mur- 
ray '22 lost his home which he had just 
recently completed. Harold Stevenson 
'24 narrowly escaped being crushed to 
death by a falling tree. Doug Barnes and 
Lewie Keith '25 were miraculously saved 
from death, when they dived under a 
large Mack truck. Reg Hart '16 had 
considerable damage done to his home, 
l.ewie Keith saved his |»et canary, only 
to have it murdered the next day by a 
blue- jay." 

P 

llatton Langshaw '26 is vacationing in 
a bank in Canada for 10.50 per! 

P 

Pat Percival '24 is a research chemist 
at the New Hampshire Experiment 
Station. 

On the recent trip to Rattlesnake 
Cutter a co-ed was heard to remark that 
the gutter was gorgeous! 

P 

Abigail A. House announces the arrival 
of the "Amoeba". For the unenlightened, 
the "Amoeba" is ■ donah flivver. 
P 

If you have something good on a class- 
mate, don't keep it a secret, but send it 
to the Personals editor, at the Collegian 

office. 

P 

"Red" Nottebaert lost a shoe up Lover's 

Lane last Friday. 

P 

Last Monday, Mac Cummings passed 
the cigars at the Hut a Chi house. The 
lucky girl is Miss Ruth Strong, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. U.S. Strong of Amherst. 

P 

Ec. Soc. 96 is no sleeping pavilion Ask 
Via Eager. 

P 

Dutch Ansell would like to see this 
column turned into a "Lost Hearts 
Column". Maybe there is a reason. 
p 

According to Frankie Thompson, there 

is no need to worry about the hardness 

of the Nash House; steps. There is 

always the family Ford. 

p 

We wonder who is the college's graceful 

dancer. Prof. Rand says there is one. 

Incidentally, he remarked that a person 

must throw his grace to the four winds 

to execute the modern stuff. 

"Blondy" Mills Ixdieves in the slogan 

"It Pays to Advertise". 

p 



Ray Criftin says there is a girl for each 
type of date. We wonder which kind pre- 
dominates in his list 

Freddie Thayer hopes to get his M.S.A. 

upon graduation. 

p 

The cafeteria serving line wishes the 

customers would refrain from sending 

mail orders for coffee from the cash 

register. 

p 

Dick Crover went to New York last 
week. He claims that in all the time he 
was there, he did not see one good look- 
ing woman. This should make him 
popular with our local population. 



Schooner "Chance", 
Fkortiarsuk, Labrador, 
August :«>, 1999. 
Dear Dr. Torrey: 

Having just dropped my "Strasburger" 
after three hours of concentration lit is 
very cold here), I think I CM do M 
better than to start a report to you con- 
cerning myself. Of course the place of 
writing means very little because no 
white man has ever been here before. 
60 c N. Lit .. 95 milts southwest from the 
coast, anchored at the head of a gn ,U 
fjord in a small schooner with sevt n 
young fellows (1 am the oldest) ami a 

cook. This expedition to which I an 

"the bortanist" is from Harvard and was 
sent up here to take cross sections of the 
continental shelf (soundings, water sam- 
ples and tsnrperatttreS at different depths 
—life at surface and at 20 fathoms), ex- 
plore the fjords taking soundings and 
samples of water and fauna, and to 
collect plants on the s uppo se dl y un- 

glaciated and supposedly limestone Torn- 
g«! Mountains. The Fsipiimo are a 
knowing people, for Torngat means 
"bad spirit". 

The eX|R«lition has been very success- 
ful for we have taken all the soundings 
and samples, explored two fjords only 
the mouths of which have heretofore 
been known, worked north and explored 
wo fjords which were absolutely un- 
known, obtained samples of fish none ol 
which are known from this region, and 
collected extensively from the diminutive 
Hora of this awful country. 

The personnel is, I suppose, an average 
crowd of young fellows. The skipper, 
captain ami owner of the vessel is Colum- 
bus Iselin, 22 years old, Harvard '26— a 
skillful clever fellow and a good sailor. 
The others, too, are good fellows all, and 
the crew is unique in that no one is 
affected by seasickness. The ctnjk is a 
Newfoundlander who is all right in every 
respect and a mighty handy man about 
the vessel. 

What we have seen of the scenery has 
bean elegant but only five times has the 
sun shone through the great cloud masses 
and then never for more than five hours. 
The mountains are everlastingly bathed 
in clouds and although we explored two 
fjords we have no idea what the moun- 
tain masses about I hem are like. It rams 
every day and usually all day and night. 
The winds blow the cloud masses back 
and forth but never away. Above 9000 
feet all is snow covered; below that level 
snow and ice patches COVet part of the 

surface. 

The unglaciated. limestone Torngats 
do not exist. The whole system is Arch- 
aean granite and schists of many different 
kinds. Some of the peaks above MOO feet 
are unglaciated though no plant but 
Sphaerella nivalis can live there. None of 
the peaka are over 6800 feet. The sides 
of the fjords have some remarkable 
series of wave-cut terraces up to :i<H) feet 
and we have found two old sea bottoms 
at that height. The sides of the fjords 
are generally about 1000 feet cliffs. Be- 
hind these the country is rocky and barren 
with no soil. Mosses are plentiful but 
this would bt a hard old country to raise 
tobacco and onions on. The valley floors 
are covered with Alnus crispa and Setts 
sps. ad infinitum. Many species of 
Saxifraga and Antennaria; several species 
of Carex, Eriophorum, Poa, Festuca, 
Junius. Arenaria, Ranunculus, Praba, 
Poteutilla, Epilobium, Campanula, Tarax- 
m urn. Scirpus. Lunula, tietula, Oxyria, 
Steltann, Cerastium, Papaver, Sedum, 
Kibes, Rubus, Astragalus, Empetrum, 
P\rola, Arctnstaphylos, Yaicimum, Pedi- 
culans, Plantago, Aster, Senecio, Euuise- 
Inni and a species of two or Lyeopodium, 
make up practically all of the flora. 1 
have also collected brown and red algae, 
fungi, and spiders for people at Harvard. 
Since leaving Newfoundland, 700 miles 
BgO, we have had no light-houses, buoys 
or charts, so you see we have done some 
real navigating, especially since the coast 
is a continuous mass of rocks and shoals. 
We have stood watch in the cross-trees 
snd heaved the lead constantly. Have 
only put the vessel aground four times 
and since 1 am writing now it is evidmt 
that we got her off each time. Now we 
are ready to leave for home. If this ever- 



Delta Phi Camiua will hold its first 
dance of the year in honor of the fresh- 
men and new pledges of the society, next 
Friday evening after the mass meeting 
in Memorial Hall. 

A 

Last Sunday afternoon at four o'clock 
under the auspices of the Y.W.C.A., 
Miss Josephine Wolcott of Smith CoHeg i 
gave a talk on the welfare work of the 
national organization. The lecture w,i~ 
given in Memorial Hall. A large nuniUr 
attended. 

A 



The Y.W.C.A. is planning a busking 
bee for the evening of November '). All 
m e m bers are invited to attend. 
A 

The riding classes for the women 
students of the college started last week. 
The classes will be held on Mondays and 
Tuesdays at .'L45 o'clock. 



With The Faculty 

Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain has been 
absent for a few days attending the 
anniversary exercises at Johns Hopkins 
University from which place he received 
his Ph.D. in 1890. 



During the summer Room 132 in the 
Chemistry Laboratory was fitted up for 
chemical work by the addition of a hood 
and steam drying closet as well as i 
large case for the pu r p ose of storing 
chemicals and apparatus. This is one ot 
the s|)ecial research rooms and is now 
occupied by Dr. Frederic R. Butler 
Room 200 in the Experiment Station 
wing is also being fitted to inert the 
increased requirements of the station. 



Prof. F. W. Morse and Dr. C. R 
Fellers are at present giving particular 
attention to the chemistry of the cran 
berry. Dr. Fellers is determining the 
pectin content of the two leading varieties 
of cranberries. This work is done in 
conjunction with the Massachusetts Cran- 
berry ( '.rowers' Association. 



lasting log lifts long enough for us to run 
750 miles down to the Straits ol Belle Me 
we will again Ik- in the realm of light 
houses and buoys. We have a small 
engine but the gas is all gone. We had 
000 K allotis most of which was need up in 
soundings, etc. 

We have practically lived in our oilers, 

sea boots and sou'westers. While o f - s ho w 

we were caught in a northeast gale which 

blew 90 miles an hour for three days. Wf 

hoVS the vessel to under the foresail and 

stood watches. The waxes swept the 

decks carrying away SOUK of the light 

rigging. We constantly had to jockey 

her around huge icebergs and luckily 

missed them all. We have had in to 

contend with all summer. When wt get 

back to the GoM of St. Lawrence it will 

seem like sailing a toy boat in a pond. 

We have been so smart so far it would 

be a shame if anything stopped OUT < v 

pedition now. 

The vessel is only 7<> feet long and Ll 
feet wide. It was built in Nova Scorn 
last winter especially for this work N 
was made strong and seaworthy. We bopt 
to sail her 150 miles a day on the e-aj 
home but we will be lucky if we svel 
100 miles daily. We have not heard tn.m 
home since early in July when are left 
St. Johns, Newfoundland. 

We are all pretty hard after sailing the 
vessel all summer for we do get IS ■ lot 
of work in a day, trimming the sail-, BOUa| 
aloft, steering, pumping up the anchor bj 
hand and capstan, pumping out the bOgCi 
washing our clothes, etc. The average 
daily temperature is from 35° t'» 4 -° r 
Of course we wear heavy woolens. Our 
food is very good; it consists mainly o< 
bread, oatmeal, fresh fish, salt lis", rue. 
potatoes, salt-horse, salt pork beam 
dried vegetables, dried apples. pru«* 
soups, strawberry jam, marmalade', a* 
pilot crackers— also hardtack which 
have cracked a tooth on. Wc hli i 
water barrels from mountain stress* 
with buckets and a funnel. We all h.m 
full beards— imagine what we look It**- 

The hauls which we gel in the plank** 
nets are most wonderful. The stoPP* 
and I are always so eager to see tbt 
ones" which come up. Shipper is g°*J 
to work up his collections at HarVSK 
next year. . . 

Since there are no people and iw I 
offices in these latitudes this li'"' '. *"' 
be mailed al.out 700 miles SOOtll 
Sincerely, 

Rob Waodworti 



$ 



THE 



CASH IN ON VALUE 
You will find our Fall Goods have splendid appeal. Let "TOM" show you imported wares 
that are really worth while. Ayres and Smith Caps Welsh -Margetson Haberdashery. 

HOUSE OF WALSH ■■■■■BOilll||lBBH A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



$ 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 



SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special. SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



|lhe Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



MADGE KENNEDY AT 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



At the Academy of Music-, Northamp- 
ton, Saturday, October 80, afternoon and 
evening, Chariot I . Wagner preaenta 
Madge Kennedy la ■ charming comedy <>i 
love, laughter and lie~. "Love~uva Mlet," 
by Amelia Rive*, (Princew Troubetaho) 
and Gilbert Emery, with Sidne) Black' 
mar, former leading man of the- North* 
ampton Playera and New Y<nk east 
direct from (i.iieiv Theatre, V V. Mail 
orden now. Boa office tale opena Thurs- 
day, October -'K al 10 a. ill. Trices 

Evening 7.V to |2.fl0| Matinee ."><>e ie> 

$1».(M>. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Prof. Christian I. flnnncee att en ded 

the meeting of the North Atlantic section 
of the American Association of Agricul- 
tural Engineers which was held *at Penn- 
sylvania State College on^Octoher 11. 
Professor Gunness was elected chairman 
of this section and the next meeting will 
be held next fall in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. One of the livest topics discussed 
at this last nuetiiiK was Rural Electri- 
fication. 



The Fl or ic u l tu re detriment has re- 
cently received an excellent airplane- 
photograph of the greenhouse/ eatabliaO 
mint of A. N. Pierson Inc. at Croniwell, 
Conn. This plant is now under the 
supervision of \Y. R. Pierson '01. 



A collection of oil paintings by modern 

American patntera will tooa !*■ placed in 

tile- Memorial Ifuilding by Prof. I rank A. 
Waugh. This exhibition will be the 
largest one of the year and will include 
about thirty paintinga in all. 



TWO-YEAR GRID TEAM SUFFERS 

(Continued from Pufte I) 



Hardy, <|l> 
McNamara, Ihb 

Peel, rhb 
Clifford, fb 

Score- by [M-riods 

Vermont Academy 



<|b, Holland 

rhb, Butler 

lhb, Kelly 

fb, Buttera 
l 2 8 i T. 

(I | : ig 



Touchdowns: ClilTord '2, Hardy. Points 

Irom tiy alle-r touchdown: Me \amar.i. 

Referee: Rev;. in. Umpire: Salman. Head 

linesman: Couhig. Time : four 12-niiniitc- 
perio d* , Sulistitiitieins: Vermont Mue- 
ehett for l.cClair, layfu-lel for Davta, 
Purely for Hiltunin, EhVidge for Peel 
Snyder U>r Eidridge; Maaa. Aggie — Law- 
son for Kelly. 




Select your 
College Shoes 
from the largest 
assortment in 
Western Massachusetts. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

275 High St., Holyoke 



Discriminating "Aggie" men buy their 

SHOES GOLF HOSE SWEATERS 




Newest Styles, Newest Patterns, Highest Quality. Priced, - $25 to $60. 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 
Mr. Patrick B, Brananalrt. arko lot 

some time- w.i* in charge e>f the- Poultry 
l>is«-.isc Elimination work e>i the- l>e-|>.ut 
meal of Veterinary Science, is noa la 
charge- ot the Public Health Laboratory, 

Ne-w I lave-ii, t nun. 

Mr. Philip II. Smith, OAdal Cherntal 

in charge ol the- Iced Control of the- 

Experiment Station. ha> been in Wash 
Ington during the- past week attending a 

meeting of the- Aaaociatiofl ol Official 

Agrie -till ural ( 'hemiata, 



A Large Assortment 

OK— 

Birthday and Christmas Cards 
At 

MRS. SHUMWAY'S 

84 ri.-;is.iii i si. 



DRORY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 
120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



The Cranberr) Eaparimeni Station at 
l-asi W.iiehani will have an exbihet al 

the fall show of the- Maaaachujetta Horti- 
cultural Society, Novemlw 4, ft and *i In 
lloiticultur.il Hall in BoatOO, in CO> 

o|H-ration with (he- M.i -ac huscttt. (ran 

berry < ■rowera' \>n.m Union and inehv iduel 
cranberr) l»>g operative*. This will l» 
tin- largest exhibit evet to ba made- bt 
an) branch 1 ol the- cranberry htduatry. 

Dr. II. J. Krunklin '<>.'{ will ba m chargi 

.iih I all who are inte-re-Mc el in I he- Cane CcmI 

cranberr) iadnatry en in Capi Cod keel! 
will In- welcomed. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First home smith of c.impu>. 
Telephone 511 



Fitsftcket 

and 

Pursej 




PEPPERMINT 
FLAVOR 

Used by 
People of Refinement— 

Because Wrigley's, besides 
being a delightful confection, 
affords beneficial exercise to 
the teeth and clears them of 
food particles. 

Also it aids digestion. cm 

After Every Meal 



l.asi Monday Director Haskell of the 

Experiment Station and Directm Muaaoa 

of the Intension Service were- in atten- 
dance al the Annual I egislative Confer- 
ence which was held in Worcester. At 
this meeting all matters pertaining to the 
College e»r it> work were- dise iisx-d prior 

to any definite hills being formulated. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Radio Sets, Parts, and Advise. 
Corona and Remington Typewriters. 
Coif, Tennis, Baseball. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

KKAR AMIIh KM BANK 



"Pointex"Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 



"Pointei" means perfection and 
"Polntex" is made only by "Onyx' 



G. Edward Fisher 




You're At 
An Oasis Now 

t I In- caravan preparing at the 
oasis for desert drought is a 
reminder that it's well for 
everyone to provide for future 
needs. 

You can do so by arranging 
for our Life Income Policy 
now. Later you will receive 
from it $100 monthly from 
age 65 on, or earlier if dis- 
abled; $10,000 insurance for 
your family meanwhile. i 

Write for descriptive booklet. 

Connecticut General 
Life i nsuranceCompany 

ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 27.'* Tel. Creenfield 1X73 M 

Greenfield, Maaa. 



SHIRTS and TIES at 
QINSBURQ'S, 19 Pleasant St. 



THIS WEEK END... 



Buy your coat where you can buy it right. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Your needs will be many for the game, house parties, etc. Our clothes are distinctive, exclusive and correct for this 
occasion. Come in and do your shopping early. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER FiYANNIS 

AMHERST 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27, H26 



You will find an •kCaiUnt 

. . . SIIOK KKI'AIRINU SHOP 
equipped with <h« mo»t up-to-date t.oodyi-ur 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
„ III Amlty-St . OPP New Theatre 

Wt understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed Skoes shtned and dyed. 60, 

VINCKNT <;KANI>ONICO. Prop. 

The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

gfr g 5 t&KaJbL Stare 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up om «»*ht) 

OculUt. Prescription. PlUod. Brokoo !•..•. 

accurately replaced 

BIC; BEN ALARM CLOCK* and other 

reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While I ' Wait 

H&" PRICES 
Menu Whole Soles. Rubber Heelu - - • IJ.95 
Men'i Half Soles, Rubber Heel* - - • 1-75 
Men'i Rubber Solei, Rubber Heel* - - 2.25 

Men, Half Sole* >•*• 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



Say "JOHN FOTOS" when you are 
in NEED of a pair of nice OXFORDS. 
Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS 

SKI.K-SKRVICK SIIOK STORK 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherit, Ma*. 

Our Laundry First CUm 

Our Policy Guarant*^ 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Pout Oftj C t 



Informal Days Are Near- 

Y™.'ll Pnirw the social times ahead far more if your haberdashery and clothing come from 

You II en,oy SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



ACADEMY 



OF MUSIC tues. ^ 
ONE NIGHT NOV. ^ 



NotSIn^CAN COMPARE WITH IT! 

Biggest Show in the _, fm BfjflEST; 







FRENCH ENAMELS 

PERFUMES, 
HANDKERCHIEFS 

and other 

Imported Novelties 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

M. A. C. Stationery 

Fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



Staged by 
JOHN MURRAY ANDERSON 



Famous Cast and Music Box Girls. 



COMPANY OF 125 CHORUS OF 60 

4 Carloads of Scenic and Electrical Effects 



PRICES $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $3.00 plus tax 
MAIL ORDERS FILLED. Box Office Sale opens Thurs. Oct. 28 



1 930 

M. A.G. STATIONERY— OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



an 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

\ ICTROLAS and VICTOR RECORDS-The best in music, wheth- 
er dance, vocal or instrumental, and correctly reproduced on 
the Orthophonic Victrola. New releases each Friday. 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 




JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



" BOSTONIANS" 

Bostonians are designed 
to meet the requirements 
of the most discriminat= 
ing College man 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



OldGrad^ 

of the 
Class of 

'07 



PRINCE ALBERT stepped out into the world 
nearly twenty years ago. Success was immediate 
. . . and outstanding. Because P. A. measures 
up to the first and greatest rule for success: // has 
the good*! The school of experience has pro- 
duced no finer tobacco than this. 

Just buy yourself a tidy red tin of P. A. and 
tamp a load flush with the muzzle of your old 
jimmy-pipe. Connect with a match, and let 
that first wonderful drag tell you that no other 
tobacco can come within a mile of this for sheer 
pipe-quality. 

Cool as a dormitory radiator. Sweet as an 
extra cut. Fragrant as a peach-orchard. P. A. 
can't bite your tongue or parch your throat 
— another important detail. Get yourself some 
Prince Albert today. No other tobacco can 
bring you so much downright smoke-pleasure. 

>RINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 




P. A. It sold everywhere fm 
tidy red lint, found and naif- 
pound tin humidon , and 
pound crystal -glass kumidort 
with tponge-moittener top. 
And always with every bit 
nf bite and parch removed by 
.he Prince Albert proeeti. 




© 1926, R. T. Reynold* Toha.co 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C 



FREE 

CR^NK. CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



Slip jWaaMrfruflgtta QkUejttan 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3, 1926 



'<•*: 



Nun >?r 6 



FALL FLOWER SHOW 
TO COME NEXT WEEK 



Will Be in Sole Charge of Floriculture 
Committee. Keen Competition 

I \ petted. 



There have been many changes tins 

in t lie management of the annual 
(all (lower show, which is to be held in 
French Hall on November and 7. In 

wars the exhibition lias been under 
die Mipervision of the Floriculture De- 
partment, in co-operation with the 

Holyoke and Northampton Florist and 

Garden Club. This year, however, it 
Mill be under the direct control of the 
Floriculture Club. 

The flower show committee, which will 
have charge of the general arrangements 
is as follows: Alan F. Small, Graduate 
Student, Chairman; Jennie M. Wiggin 
•27, Miriam II. Huss '», Phillip C. 
Brown '30 and John J. Serois '30. Be- 
lidet this general committee there are 
-rural special committees. 

(limpet it ion among the students will 

be unusually keen this year and will be 

open to all students who are majoring in 

Floriculture. The several contests are as 

follows: table decorations, open to seniors 

in the four-year course; bowl and VWM 

displays, open to juniors in the four-year 

murse; and table decorations, o|>en to 

*niors in the two-year course. As usual, 

chrysanthemums will predominate t hrough- 

uiitthe show. All the (lowers used in the 

variotM competitions are grown in the 

College greenhouses. There will be three 

jodgea, who will be selected from the 

: of the Floriculture Department. 

Phut have btai submitted by a number 

indents and the novelties will be 

1 teed on the best. 

(Continued on Page 2 

Exhibit Shows Work 

of Leading Painters 

Many of Best Known Artists in 
America Represented. 



An unusually attractive collection of 
oil paintings by modern American painters 
is now on exhibition at the Memorial 
Building. Many of the best known artists 
in America are represented, such as W. L. 
Lathrop, Frederick J. Waugh, (iardner 
Symons, Ben Foster, Carl Vonnoh, 
Horatio Walker, Jonas Lie, and others. 
For the first time the famous "Santa Fe 
School" of painters is shown to the 
MAC. community through striking pic- 
tuns by K. Irving Couse, and Walter 
Ufcr. 

The paintings have been assembled by 

the American Federation of Arts especially 

far ( iieulation to American colleges. They 

ire MOWB here under the direction of 

or Frank A. Waugh. 

The exhibition will remain in place 
al>out two weeks, being open every day 
and evening. The public is always 
•elcome. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"The scholar who cherishes the love 
of comfort is not fit to be deemed a 
scholar," 



Wednesday — 
f>45 Razoo Night. 

Night Shirt Parade. 
Thursday— 
3 •'!•") Assembly: Professor Frank 

I 'i entice Rand. 
4.3<) Six- Man Rope Pull. 
L30 Interfraternity Conference 
-Meeting. 
Saturday— Dean Saturday. 
9 a. m. to 10 p. m. Flower Show, 

French Hall. 
Varsity Football: Springfield 

College, there. 
Varsity Cross-Country: Boston 

University, there. 
Two- Year Football: Pittsfield 
High, here. 
Sunday— 

9 1'J Sunday Chapel: Rev. Robert 

R. Wicks. Second Congregational 

Church, Holyoke. 
' P- m. to 9 p. m. Flower Show — 

1 rench Hall. 
Wednesday— 
^U'homore-Freshman numeral 

football game. 



ENTHUSIASM HIGH 

AT MASS MEETING 



"Kid" Core is Most Prominent 
Speaker at Gathering Before 
Amherst Came. 



The mas.-, meeting held in StOckbridge 
Hall last Friday evening WBS one of the 
most successful indoor mass meetings 
ever held. Mr. Moses Brines of Chicago, 

who entertained the student l>ody in 

Assembly tWO weeks ago, was present .uul 

introduced two nen songs which the 

students took up with gre.it avidity and 
ease. 

"Kid" Core, the inimitable Aggie 
coach, was the principal s|>caker on the 
program. Shaking on the prospects of 
the coming game he said that he wanted 
to be able to send his "little green team" 
on the field with the mental keeiiess 
necessary to win a contest in which the 
opposing team is the favorite, lie amused 
the students by telling how "green" some 
of the men now on the varsity were when 
he first started to work with them this 
season. "Some of the men on the team 
have never had a football suit on until 
this fall," he said. "Kid" thinks that it 
i» unfortunate that it takes adversity to 
show how many friends one has; he has 
received more messages this year, when 
his team is "new", than he has during 
Mime of the years when his team has 
Ixcn very successful. 

Movie-, of the Amherst-Aggie game of 
1924 when the team defeated Amherst 
were shown at the beginning of the 
meeting. Professor Hicks, "Koarin' Bill" 
Munson, Ray GraytOO, and Professor 
Sears made short s|K-eches relating to the 
coming game. The meeting broke up 
with a loud — 

"Oh! 

When the game is over 

We will ring the bell! 



COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP 
RECORDS ANNOUNCED 



Delta Phi Alpha Again Leads Fra- 
ternities. Senior Class Does Best 



The fraternity scholarship standings, 
which is computed every year, has just 
been completed for the past year. The 
following are the fraternity averages for 
the year 1925-1926 as issued from the 
Dean's Office: 

Delta Phi Alpha 31.61 

Sigma Phi Fpsilon 78.41 

Kappa Gamma Phi 77 64 

Alpha Gamma Rho 77.51 

Kappa Sigma 77.32 

Delta Phi Gamma 77 13 

Kappa Epsilon 77. 10 

ThetaChi 76.52 

Phi Sigma Kappa 76.26 

Q. T. V 76.10 

Non-Frat. or Sor 75.83 

Alpha Sigma Phi 75.32 

Lambda Chi Alpha 75.02 

A comparison between the averages of 
the vaiious fraternities for the past two 
years reveals many interesting facts. The 
scholarship for 1925-1926 of the entire 
four-year course is practically the same 
as that of 1924-1925 although there is a 
slight decrease. In 1924-1925 the average 
was 76.86 whereas in 1925-1926 it de- 
creased 0.03 to 76.83. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



EIGHT FRATERNITIES 

HOLD HOUSE DANCES 



Festive Spirit Prevalent Despite 
Threatening Weather. 



House dances were the order in the 
majority of the fraternities after the 
Amherst game and judging from all the 
reports alumni and undergraduates en- 
joyed themselves to the utmost at the 
various parties. The following eight 
fraternities held dances: Alpha Gamma 
Rho, Alpha Sigma Phi, Kappa Eps i l oa, 
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Q.T.V. 
Hallowe'en furnished the keynote for the 
decorations in the houses and the notes 
for the dancing were furnished by orches- 
tras from various places. A sky which 
threatened rain throughout the afternoon 
diil not dampen the spirits of the dancers 
either figuratively or literally and resulted 
in a warm evening which added to the 
enjoyment of many. 



INDEX PICTURES 
Sunday, November 7 



10.15 M.A.C.C.A. 

10 JO— Men's (.lee Club 

i(t.4f>- (dee Club Orchestra 
ll.oo— Roister Doisten 
ii.io Soph-Senior Hop Com. 
1 1.80 —Informal Com. 
11.46—1898 Prom Com. 

12.00— Debating Team. 

This will Ih- the dual chance for 
the above groups. 



Good Season Expected 

for Musical Clubs 



Men's Glee Club and Co-ed Glee 
Club Developing Fast Under Coach- 
ing of Mrs. Beaumont. 



The Musical Clubs are now fully 
organized and preparations are now In-ing 
made for one of the l>est seasons in the 
history of the College. Rehearsals are 
l>eing held every Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday evenings. At present then 
are forty-two in the Men's (dee Club and 
thirty-two in the Co-ed Glee Club. 

This year both of the dice Clubs will 
be coached by Mrs. Arthur B. Beaumont 
of Amherst. She is developing a men's 
and a co-ed quartet which will serve M 
a Ic.ituie on the program. In addition 
'Continued on Page .' 



COMMITTEE APPOINTED 

FOR POULTRY SHOW 



In anticipation of a better poultry 
show than ever In-fore, Miss Marion C. 
Pulley, Instructor in Poultry Husbandry, 
has chosen the following chairmen to 
liegin working at their rcs|>ectivc tasks: 

Educational Program, Rol>ert C. Ames 
'27; Secretary, C. D Dewar, Vocational; 
Educational Exhibits, Alfred 11. Parker, 
Two- Year; Contests, Ralph W. Anderson, 
Two- Year; Student Judging, Frederick 
O. Sime, Two- Year. 

Further information will be published 
later concerning the details. 



Many Couples Attend 

First Co-ed Dance 



Delta Phi Gamma Holds Initial 
Dance of Year in Memorial Hall. 



Delta Phi Gamma held its first dance 
of the year last Friday evening in Memo- 
rial Hall. About sixty couples attended 
among whom were many of the alumnae 
who spent the week-end on the campus. 

The hall was beautifully decorated with 
Continued on I'afte 2) 



Aggie Harriers 

Swamp Amherst 

Seven M.A.C. Runners Finish Abreast 
to Defeat Rivals by 15-50 Score. 



The cross-country team kept up the 
season's unbroken string of victories last 
Friday when it finished seven abreast at 
Pratt Field to swamp the Lord Jeff 
harriers by a perfect 15-50 score. The 
entire Amherst team was in the lead for 
the first five or six hundred yards but the 
slower starting Agates soon forged ahead 
and remaincrl there unthreatened during 
the rest of the race. At the end of the 
fourth and last journey around the one 
and a quarter mile course the team 
lined up at the gate to the field and 
trotted across the line seven abreast as 
in the Worcester Tech meet last fall. The 
race differed from that with Worcester 
Tech, however, in that the team, not 
being tired, and being in a hurry, kept in 
going and trotted the mile or so back to 
the Drill Hall. 

This is the fourth win over the Amherst 
hill and dalers in the last five years. 
Coach Derby's team presented the usual 
lineup of Capt. Crooks, Biron, Hennc- 
berry, Nottebaert, Preston, Snell and 
Swan, all of whom finished in the time of 
30 minutes, 16 4-5 seconds. Clarke, the 
first Amherst man, finished more than a 
furlong behind them. 

The last dual meet of the season takes 
place on Saturday at B. U. and the team 
will compete in the New Knglands on 
November 15. 



r 



Fighting Aggie Team 

Defeated_by Ami., '-st 

"Little Gram Team" Makes Game Stand Against Heav... and 

More Experienced Opponents. 



SPRINGFIELD WILL BE 
NEXT GRID OPPONENT 

Aggie Eleven Will Meet Strong 
Opposition on Saturday. Coach 
Gore Hopes to Present Strongest 
Lineup. 



Next Saturday the Aggie host, eager 
for another victory, will descend on 

Springfield to witness what should pro v e 

to Ih' a colorful contest, if last year's 
Thanksgiving Day encounter is any 
criterion. A triumph for M.A.C. would 
remove this season from classilicat ion as 
wholly unsuccessful, for newspaper re- 
iwrts have it that Coach "Jack" Roth- 
acker boasts the strongest eleven since 
his arrival at Springfield. 

A year ago the AfatM IHI robbed of 
imminent victory by a "shoestring" play 

in the closing minutes, when Maddox 
(Continued on Page 2) 

Assistant Managers 

of Two Sports Named 

Burgess and Chadwick, Both '29, 
in Line for Managerships of Baseball 
and Track. 



TWO of the first assistant managers of 
s|Hirts to be chosen under the new clee 
tion system are John S. Chadwick of 
Worcester and Emory D. Burgess of 
Melrose Highlands, both of the class of 
'29. Chadwick has been ap|M>iuted 
assistant manager of track and Burgess 
assistant manager of ba-.i-b.dl. Each has 
been chosen after a long period of com- 
petition as the most promising candidate 
for the respective managerships. 

The system of electing managers was 
changed at Student Forum last winter. 
Under the old system the names of the 
two candidates having the highest rating 
were voted on by the student body. In 
order that the election might not be 
affected by fraternity politics and social 
bias rather than by the merits of the 
candidates, the present system was 
adopted. Under this system the assis- 
tant manager is selected by a committee- 
composed of the general manager of 
athletics, and the captain and manager 
of the panic ular sport. Chadwick and 
Burgess will automatically become mana- 
gers in their junior year to take the 
places of Stratton, present manager of 
track and Davis, present manager of 
baseball. 



AGGIE ALUMNI PROMINENT 

IN LANDSCAPE WORK 



Landscape Magazine Has Many 
Articles by M.A.C. Graduates. 



A clean lighting, psrsJsgCttt, intelligent, 

inn ontctatatd Aggie eleven bowed to the 

Amherst team l>\ .1 score of |J tO 7 on 
Alumni Field last Saturday In-fore a laige 
Crowd ot alumni who were celebrating 
the annual tail homecoming clay. The 

Agate-., destined by prt-gamr predictions 

to overwhelming defeat, gave Amherst a 

difficult encounter in which the visitors 

Were forced to take to the air for their 
margin of victory. The M.A.C. eleven 

received fewer pane. hies, handled the ball 

more cleanly, and were ready to take 
advantage of the break-, of 1 he game. 

The first touchdown did not come until 
the second |>crioel after Coach White had 
removed his substitutes from the contest, 
although the Agates narrowly missed 
garnering three- points in the initial 
session when ( aitwright's place-kick 
barely eluded the uprights. Captain 
Cadigan of Amherst was the first to 
Crosf the goal line-, however, after shaking 
oil several tackier* and evading the Aggie 
safety -man. Not long afterward Creden 
teased I pass to Walker which resulted 
in another tally, and in the next |H-riod, 
Captain Cadigan evaded would-be tackier* 
and hnally hurled an arching forward to 

Morse (or the Anal Amherst i>oints. 

Walker plan- kicked |>erfcctly in each 
instaiic i . 

That navel say die spirit which has 
characterised the Maroon team this 
eaaana Wat revealed by continued plug- 
ging, and after reciprocal interception of 
passes with no particular gains for either 
team, Captain Cadigan added a costly 
fumble of Tufls' punt, and Murdough 
eventually recovered the oval and carried 
it over the line. 

The Sabrina seconds were completely 
outclassed during the first period. Aggie 
kicked off, and after two plays, a fumble 
was retrieved by Anderson. Ma honey 
contributed ten yards, and penalties gave 
the Agates another down. A splendid 
punt to Amherst's 25-yard line which 
was mishandled by the receiver and 
clutched by McKittrick gave M.A.C. its 
first opportunity to score. The heavy 
opposing line held, however, and Cart- 
wright attempted a place-kick which just 
failed to count. 

The heralded Amherst varsity met with 
stubborn resistance in the succeeding 
period. Tufls broke looWJ for a lit) yard 
run around left end, but the Amherst 
line broke through and blinked his punt 
shortly afterwards. Here the Aggie line, 
standing on its 10-yard mark, held and 
took the ball away from the visitors. 
After M.A.C. had kicked, however, a 
short pass from Creden to Walker, and 
(Continues! on Page 4) 



NEW DIETITIAN COMES 

TO COLLEGE DIMM; HALL 



landscape Architecture is the dignified 
official magazine of the American Society 
of Landscape Architects and the leading 
journal of the world in the field of ti-ch- 
nical landscape architecture. It is in- 
teresting therefore to find M.A.C. well 
represented in its pages. The last number 
contains an illustrated article on "Some 
English Balustrades", Joseph F. Whitney 
'17 being joint author. Another extended 
illustrated article is by A. D. Taylor '05 
on "Notes with Reference to the Con- 
struction of Areas for Lawn Sports." 
Prof. Frank A. Waugh is quoted to t he- 
extent of several pages on "Instruction 
in Landscape Gardening in American 
Colleges; A Review and Criticism," from 
a paper prepared by invitation for t ln- 
recent International Congress of Plant 
Sciences. There is also a note about the 
new work at the Cambridge School of 
Domestic Architecture and Landscape 
Architecture being undertaken by William 
R. Sears '15. Stephen F. Hamblin '12 
reviews a bulletin on Hardy Shrubs by 
Charles P. Halligan '04. Another article 
on Golf Course Design by Prof. Lohmann 
of Illinois shows several plans of golf 
courses designed by Langford and Moreau 
(T. J. Moreau '12) of Chicago. Looking 
through such a collection one gets the 
impression that M.A.C. men are reason- 
ably active in the l andscap e field. 



Miss Marian N. MacDonald Successor 
of Miss Diether as Manager. 



Miss Marion N. Mac Donald has been 
appointed manager of the Dining Hall to 
■evened Miss Lula Diether, who has re- 
signed to accept a |josition with the 
(jeorgian Restaurant in Springfield. Miss 
MacDonald comes from Framingham 
where she was Head Matron and Dieti- 
tian at the- Framingham Normal Schoo l 
She holds the di-grce of A.M. from Host on 
University and was Domestic Science 
teacher at Waverly. From 19J20 to 1922 
she was Dietitian at the Infants' Hospital 
in Boston. 



RAZOO NIGHT 



Razoo Night and the Nightshirt 
Parade, which will lie run on the 
same plan as last year, are sched- 
uled to take place tonight, the 
lioxing and wrestling bouts to 
commence m von after supper as 
U deemed advisable. Following 
the bouts, Ixith classes will ad- 
journ to the athletic: he ld , where- 
tin sophomores will attempt to 
rem ove the nocturnal regalia of 
the neophytes. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3. 1926 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, PupHaMtf every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



William L. DMJ '27 
Ellswouih Baknaki> '2H 



Editor-in-Chief 
ftiaaagtal Kditor 



DKl'ARTMKNT EDITORS 
Editorial William L. EM* W 

Athletic. "A!....... I. Clam W 

W. Qoannw Hisim M 
Campua New* Ernkw L. Spewm « 

Faculty & Short CMMN Edward H. Nichols m 
Intercollegiate Kditor F«ances C. Bai ck '27 
Co-Ed News Joskphink Vaszu a IH 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
rutaivK V ft AGO '27 BuilWM Manager 

f «w*s H Wh taker '27 Adverting Manager 
Se WH™ Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Lohing '28 

Edwin A. Wilder 28 

Harold K. Anski.l 29 

Lawrbnck A. Carruth i 29 

William A. Egan 29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sinj? e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Km. rod as second-claw matter at the Amherst 
Port OftVe Adopted for mailing at. **£*<«* 

tobVr. 1917. authorised Auguat 20. 1918. 



NURSERY RHYMES 

Discretion is the better part of valor. 
At the game Saturday, we left ourselves 
open to our worthy opponents' derision 
in a very dramatic fashion, and our 
neighbors were quick-witted enough to 
seize the opportunity, thus turning the 
game into a high school game as far as 
the bleachers were concerned. Again, 
when we proclaimed ourselves donkeys 
we were greeted as such from across the 
field. Although we took our opponents' 
ridicule in good spirit, there was con- 
siderable feeling of dislike among the 
Aggie rooters. But we feel that the 
Amherst supporters were merely playing 
up to the spirit that we had created. 

These nursery rhymes that were taught 
us in our singing class are valuable in 
establishing an attitude of mind condu- 
sive to good singing. The psychology of 
getting the audience in good humor is 
good. But, on the football field, we are 
no longer singing our songs, merely for 
the practice, and the artificial psycho- 
logical aids should be omitted, especially 
when they arc of the nature of Mother 
Goose rhymes. We are putting stress on 
singing so that we may sing like a college 
student Ixxly, one that loves its songs, 
and one that wants to present its songs 
with all the beauty and spirit possible. 
Then why should we not sing our songs 
without practicing the scales? 

HARRY HOUD1NI 



at the Tufts game in Medford. By a 
stretch of the imagination, those of you 
who have manifested your interest in the 
Outing Club can form a nucleus. 
***** 
Virginia Tech has inaugurated the cus- 
tom of compulsory attendance at football 
panics. If they need such a custom they 
have our sincere approval, but personally 
we feel that the student body should 
support its teams voluntarily. 



Wesleyan has started propaganda 
against brilliant frosh caps. We admit 
that the Wesleyan neophytes are hatted 
very gaudily and that possibly the head- 
gear does become as obnoxious to certain 
of the upperclassmen as to the wearers, 
but we cannot see how frosh caps are 
any worse than brilliant blazers or some 
of the outfits worn by the filles du monde. 
***** 
Several colleges are having controver- 
sies with anti-evolution ministers at the 
present and the progress of the battles 
seems to add to the idea that it is no use 
to argue over such a subject when both 
parties already have their minds made up. 
* • * * * 
The students of Illinois University 
went out on a strike this fall because the 
Dean of Women issued an edict that 
co-eds should not be allowed out of their 
houses after 6 p. m. This has been 
rightly termed a "strike for longer hours." 
The object of the rule was to suppress the 
apparent freedom in regard to social life 
but neither the men nor the women of 
the University could see the justice of 
such a step. What wottld^we do under 
similar circumstances? 



PERSONALS 



n 



FACULTY NOTES 



The square ring has its wild bull of 
the Pampas. Aggie has its wild bull of 
the campus — a la Frank Noble. 

P 

Speaking of the vertebrates, there are 
also "Ooose" Draper, "Goat" Brockway, 
"Ram" Marsh, "Gander" Amatt, and 
"Donkey" Thompson. 

P 

Heidelburg has been transported to the 
campus, the caps at least, if not the 
scholarship. 

And since we have waxed classical, we 
have dubbed two of our colleagues, 
Anthony and Cleopatra. Nuf sed. 

We have heard that it is a social asset 
to own a yellow Oldsmobile. 

P 

Another famous duet that occurs to U6 
is Hiawatha and Minnehaha. 

P 

Freddie Flemings is a fast man on the 
track and at the movies. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3, 1926 



COMMUNICATIONS 



According to a statement made by 
Prof. Fred ('. Sears of the Pomology 
Department the apple crop has bwtl very 
good this year in the New England states 
and especially in Massachusetts. The 
apples have shown very good quality 
with Baldwins much bitter than last 
year and Mcintosh considerably lighter 
than last year. The crop of the college 
orchards is practically all in now. Pro- 
fessors William R. Cole and Ralph A. 
Van Meter are at present assisting in the 
state wide observance of National Apple 
Week. They are judging various window 
displays in various parts of the state. The 
city of Greenfield alone has eighty- five 
stores which have decorated their store 
windows with apples. 



Prof. Sears, in connection with the 
National Apple Week, has been invited 
by H. J. Baker, director of extension work 
in New Jersey, to speak next week before 
a large convention. 



"llotidini, Famous Magician, Foe of 
Spirit Mediums, Dies." Harry Houdini 
has for several years been in the lime- 
light in America and abroad, largely 
because of bis battling e.\|H>sures of the 
spirit mediums' art. He wis l>orn in 
Appleton, Wis.. April 6, 1874, the son of 
Rabbi Mayer Samuel \Yei>s. It is in- 
teresting to note that llouilini's first 
success was in Europe, America having 
refused to accept him until he bad made 
good elsewhere. 

Psychologist- and many other ■ejtatiata 
haw watched lloudini for some tight on 
the problems ol the supernatural and 
nianv believe that lloudini has done much 
to disprove spirit ualism. Most scitntiM- 
agree, however, that his methods have 
not been strictly scientific lor this 
reason, his death is especially significant 
for he has left a branch of research, to 
which he has contributed much, wry in- 
complete. Scientists have been aroused 

and, as vet, no satisfactory results have 

been realized. It seems quite probable, 
therefore, that there will be many minds 
who will carry on the late "magician's" 
work; and that, in view of the clticacy of 
modern scientific methods, there should 
Ik- available' in the near future some very 
significant data. 

No matter what we think of lloudini 
and his beliefs, we should all laud him t«>i 
stimulating scientific research. We were 
interested recently in an article on Mars, 
the data for which article was collected 
from a man who asserted that he had 
communicated with that planet by mental 
telepathy. There may be something in 
it, and if there i- we ought to know about 
it. 



Dr. Glick passed cigars ami candy to 
the members of all his classes last Monday 
to announce the birth of his first daughter, 
Vonne Virginia, 8 1-2 pounds. We con- 
gratulate you, Dr. Glick, and we hope 
you have established a precedent for 
other fathers. 

***** 
There were eight house parties on the 
campus after the Amherst game. That is 
over with for the rest of the term, but 
what will we do with the remaining week- 
ends? It will be hard on those who have 
Saturday classes. 

***** 
Miss Mac Donald has succeeded Miss 
Diether as manager of the Dining Hall. 
We wonder if, with a Scotch manager, 
the board can be reduced again. 
***** 
The college owes much to Miss Diether. 
Miss Diether has lieen famous for her 
banquets, for the cafeteria, and for the 
quality of food served regularly in the 
"hash house". She has Ixen a good 
executive, as shown by the efficiency 
lK»th in the dining room and in the 
cafeteria. She has done a good job 
under undesirable conditions, for the 
dining hall has l>een under close scrutiny 
by the state officials. In fact, in every 
way, Miss Diether has ami does merit the 
highest praise from one and all. 



There are still rah rah boys at M.A.C. 
Some give three cheers for themselves. 
D.K. claims that he never went out with 
a woman who didn't fall for him. 
P 

Dr. Click and Bill Hart are passing the 
cigars. Don't get excited, Bill Hart is 
engaged. 

P 

Again the Personal Editor wishes to 
remind you who have criticisms of this 
column of two or three things. First, it 
doesn't do any good to knock behind our 
backs, if you have any kick coming let 
us hear about it; and second, that if "the 
cap fits put it on," if it doesn't, don't 
worry — your neighbor may be next. 
P 

John Tulenko '2ri is teaching science at 
the NewJSalem Academy in New Salem, 
Mass. 

Charlie Turner '26 is teaching at the 

Williamsburg High School. 

P 

GemM Gilligan is a research chemist 

for the Delaware Experiment Station. 

P 

Martin Cupery is a candidate for Ph.D. 

at the University of Illinois. 

P 

Heard at the game: 

Small lx>y— Hey, mister, have the 

people stand up a lot today, will ya? 

Cheerleader— Sure, why? 

S.B.— 'Cause when they stand up, they 

lose a lotta money out of their pockets 

P 

Cheer up! Ten or fifteen years from 

now you'll M an alumnus, according to 

Charlie Could. 

p 

Little horse takes big man for ride! 
Firpo Russell gave an exhibition of bronco 
busting the Other day. 

P 



A very excellent exhibit of early 
American antiques and one which is 
attracting more interest possibly, than 
any previous exhibition is now being 
shown at the Jones Library. This exhi- 
bition was arranged by Prof, and Mrs. C. 
V. Glatfelter and much of the furniture 
was loaned by them. The exhibit is ar- 
ranged in the asembly room, entrance hall, 
and study, giving these rooms a true 
Colonial atmosphere. 



The Collec.ian is at all times glad to pul 
my communications which may be sent to it b»i 
the Kditors will assume no responsibility lor the 
views expressed, and do not necessarily end.,. ,. 
-uch views. 

To the editor of the Collegian : 

Our mass meetings are great things. 
Our football team deserves the sup|>ort 
which can be given by the student body, 
But why concentrate all our cheering on 
football? We have another great team 
which is setting a new record at tin 
college. I refer to the cross-country 
team, which has not suffered a defeat this 
year and which is upholding the standardl 
of the college fully as well as the footbal 
team. It is not a sport which can be 
followed from start to finish by a group 
of supporters, but must receive what 
support it gets only at the start and 
again at the finish. Why not give these 
men the support of the college at mass 
meetings and let them know we are all 
behind them? There may not l>e any 
visible glory for any member of a cross- 
country team, but when we have seven 
men who work hard day in and day out 
we should see that they realize the 
support we are giving them. Cross- 
country is no easy sport and except for 
the physical contact which occurs in 
football there is no harder sport and no 
sport which needs a stronger heart. Let's 
not forget these men. Let's make mass 
meetings support this team as well as 
the football team. 

C. F. R. 



SPRINGFIELD WILL BE NEXT 

Continued from Page I) 
crouched on the sidelines as the teams 
lined up, and subsequently received, un- 
molested, a pass from Berry. 

Springfield has dropped two contests 
thus far, both by to 3 scores, indicative 
of their defensive ability, to Manhattan 
and Delaware, while victories have been 
secured over Rensselaer, New Hampshire 
State, and B. U. The Aggie record docs 
not embrace so many wins. Worcester 
Tech has been conquored, but Bates, 
Conn. Aggie, Williams, and Amherst 
could not be denied. 

The Red and White presents a seasoned 
team thi6 fall, with a veteran line and a 
fleet backfield. Captain Hafner, Bardo, 
Bartlett, Thompson, and Bollier are 
letter-men among the forwards, while 
Mahnken, and Boughner were regular 
performers in the backfield last year. The 
rush line is particularly heavy, while in 
Smith, Williamson, and Steeves, Coach 
Rothacker has three star ball-carriers. 
The entire team has noticeably improved 
since the advent of "Art" Johnson at 
quarterback. 

If Johnson and Cook fully recover from 
their injuries, "Kid" Gore will have a 
promising list of l>acks in Cox, Haertl. 
Mahoney, Nitkicwicz, Quinn, Tufts, and 
the aforementioned pair from which to 
select a quartet. The forward line seems 
destined to remain intact, with Black and 
Anderson alternating at left guard. 
Springfield has available Bollier, Bardo, 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Radio Sets, Parts, and Advise. 
Corona and Remington Typewriters. 
Golf, Tennis, Baseball. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAJt AMHERST BANK 



(A Large Assortment 
<r» -~ —of— zzz *"""— 

Birthday and Christmas Cards 

— AT— 

MRS. SHUMWAY'S 

84 Pleasant St. 



FALL FLOWER SHOW TO COME 

.Continued from Pafte 1 1 

The display will be Open to the general 
public during the entire show and all 

interested will be we l c om ed at any time. 
On Saturday the exhibition will be open 

from it a. m. to 10 p. m. and on Sunday 
from 1 a. in. to 8 P- m. The annual 
Skinner Cup competition will not be held 
at the show this year, but at the llolyoke 
and Northampton Florist and Garden 

Club's flower show in Northampton. 



What would Angie Merlini do without 
the six-thirty car from town to get him j a nd Craig, ends; Hafner, Clogston, and 



to hash in the morning? 
P 



The Beat In Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 
th* * &*xatL Harm 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While I) Walt 

NK PRICES 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels • • ■ W.» 

Men's Hair Soles. Rubber Heels - • • I » 

Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels • - 2.1» 

Men's Half Sole* • ■*• 

Work Guaranteed— AM II KRST IKH'SE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



loniniy Walsh has a new ap|x-lation 
for Andy Anderson: the smooth looking, 
chesty boy from M.A.C. 

— p — 

"The alert McKit trick" seems to be 
very adept at around the neck tackling. 
P 

"Bred" Brockway says that a drive to 
Pittstield in the rain is not so bad with 
the right company. 



Wherle, tackles; Bartlett and Leader, 
guards; Thompson, center; Johnson, 
quarterback; Williamson, Mahnken, 
Smith, or Steeves at half; and Boughner 
at fullback. 

DEERFIELD SECONDS 

TROUNCED BY FROSH 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

i PLEASANT STREET, (up on. Sight 

Oculists Prescriptions PlUod. Broken leas* 

accurately replaced 

UK. BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 



"Joe" Hilyard's Proteges Fall Before 
Strong Attack of Aggie Youngsters. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

Worcester Tech's Knights of the Road 
have been revived this year. How many- 
did you see at the game here two weeks 
ago. How about a similar society at 
M.A.C? We should have a g<x>d crowd 



COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP 

Continued from Pafte 1) 

Delta Phi Alpha continues to bead the 
li>t in Spite of the fact that its average- 
has been slightly lowered. Sigma Phi 
hpsilea has (hanged from seventh place 
up to second and Kappa Gamma Phi 
continues to hold the third birth with 

Alpha Gamma Rho, which was second in 

1034-1935, in fourth place. 

Seven of the groups have raised their 
averages and six have changed to higher 
positions in the standing. Sigma Phi 
EpeUQU has increased its average more 

than any other group, its increase bring 

1.54. Delta Phi ( '.annua has the next 
greatest increase with 1.08. 

The Dean's Office has also issued the 
cJaaa averages for the year 1936- IB3& 

They are as follows. 

Senior, 1926 *"•*.< 

Juniors, 11127 EB.fi 

Sophomores, 1928 78.3 

Freshmen, 1929 W.fi 



GOOD SEASON EXPECTED 

(.Continued from Pafte I) 
to this, the men will have a double 
quartet as a novelty. 

The dance orchestra has been formed 
by I- Rockwell Smith. Jr., '38. At 
present rehearsals are being held every 
week. The orchestra, in addition to its 
regular dance numbers is working up 
several senii-cl.isskal pieces which will In- 
worked into the concert program. 



MANY COUPLES ATTEND 

(Continued from Pafte I 

Hallowe'en figures; pumpkins and corn- 
stalks formed the background for the 
witch who stirred her |K)tion over a fire 
in the corner of the room. 

Mrs. Alfred J. Huthsteiner and Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Frank A. Waugh chaper- 
oned the dance. The committee in 
charge was comjx>sed of Dorothy A. 
Chapman '28, Chairman; Frances Bruce 
'27, and Ruth Faulk '29. Moon Mullen's 
Melodious Music Makers provided the 
music. 



A Deerticld Academy second eleven 
coached by Joe llilyard, took a 894 
trouncing Monday afternoon on Alumni 
Field from the freshman team, coached 
by Phil Couhig, one of Hilyard's old team 
mates. In spite of the fact that their goal 
line was crossed for the first time, the 
neophytes piled up six touchdowns against 
the Deerfield Ix.vs in 31 minutes of actual 
playing time. 

The playing on the pact of the treshmen 
was rather erratic at first and the Academy 
team managed to cross their goal line, but 
the yearlings soon found themselves and* 
marched down the field time after time 
for a series of touchdowns. Kneeland and 
Bond were instrumental in advancing the 
ball in the first part of the game while 
Kllert and Ciandomenico did good work 
in the last half. Mann, Wecter and 
Warren played a sterling game on t he- 
defense. Burbank accounted for one 
touchdown when he picked up a fumbled 
punt and carried it across the goal line. 
Of the other five touchdowns three were 
made by Kneeland, one by Bond and one 
by Ciandomenico. Kneeland kicked two 
extra points and Ciandomenico one. 




You re At 
An Oasis Now 

jThe caravan preparing at the 
oasis for desert drought is a 
reminder that it's well for 
everyone to provide for future 
needs. 

You can do so by arranging 
for our Life Income Policy 
now. Later you will receive 
from it $100 monthly from 
age 65 on, or earlier if dis- 
abled; $10,000 insurance for 
your family meanwhile. 
Write for descriptive booklet 

Connecticut General 
Life insuranceCompany 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1«" 
Greenfield, Mi 



$ 



CASH IN ON VALUE 
You will find our Fall Goods have splendid appeal. Let "Tom" show you imported wares 
that are really worth while. Ayres and Smith Caps Welsh-Margetson Haberdashery. 
[1 THE HOUSE OF WALSH ■■■■■■■.■■■■__ A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



$ 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Decline of Traditions 

Deplored by Speaker 

M.A.C. Almmnus Tells of Importance 
of Extra-Curricular Activities. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



Mr. Charles II. < .ould of Haydeavulr, 
•in i l u wim s of the- eonege who graduated 

in l'.IKiund w.in.i wry UaportasH iihmhIht 
of tin- varsity (likitinn teaBB dsjTMkJ his 
college years, *M the speaker at Assembly 
last week. 

The subject upon whieh Mr. Could 
spoke was the "'import ince. of Kxtra- 
( urrieular Activities." He stressed the 
tact that there is an activity for every 
(xrson in college and a place for every 
stuelent in the extra-curricular activities 
which the college presents. 

Mr. Could also pointed out that the 
alumni are very much interested in the 
activities of the students and expressed 
regret at the fact that many of the college 
traditions which they held so dear during 
their college years have been abolished. 
According to him, the tradition which the 
alumni were especially sorry to see 
abolished was the class day singing con- 
test which used to take place during 
commencement week. Mr. Could thinks 
that the interfraternity singing contest 
which has been established in place of 
the interclass contest will not accomplish 
what the old class "sings" did — that is, 
bringing together the students as classes 
rather than a distinct group, like frater 
nities. 



NEW BRIDGE TALLIES 

SCORE PADS 

PRIZES 

A big assortment just received 
We sell stamps 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Town Hall, Amherst I 




Wed. 
Thura. 

Matinee 

Ma, 

Kvcninga 
7.M 



•• I'lIK BAT" A Comady 
m>iii-f> drama by Mary 
KohrrtN Hiiuh.tr I itixl Awry 
lio|>wooti, iuk<<ii from (ha 
faniouk mutte play A pro- 
<Jui lion of hlflh minion, 
lautly »u«|>rn*l\e iniere.t. 
Hiiiltli-n I or in, shriek-. <•( 
lauilhtvr . qult-k Mirpr i». and 
aatounuMns notation. Haah- 
«» of comedy and high tcn- 
•k»n myaicry. With a nota- 
ble cam iiiloilinit. Jurk I'li'k- 
ford. Konrrt M. Kim. Jewel 
Curnien, I uulir hu/ruda a 
<• there. 
Newa Kabl— t aimed y 



"I'AK'I'NKKS At.AIN" 
with I'otaah and Ferlmut- 
ter Peal* of lauflhter, a 
■.lorni of thrllla. Km the 
Partner* fool with machin- 
ery, ace them «l«p on the 
gu«--nee them try to aell a 
rrencied " Mrhemkmann 
all -aeethemeMcupeamnb 
--•ee them flutter between 
heaven and earth in an air- 
lane 
portllthl and Comedy 



Moyd In "HOT 
With the M- 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



ROISTER DOISTERS 

The Roister Doister Dramatic Society 
will hold its first theater party of the year 
tomorrow evening. The members of the 
society will motor to Northampton to 
witness the presentation of "The Devil's 
Disciple," the Commencement Show of 
last year. 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

The (ieology Department of Princeton 
University gave what is believed to be 
the first university course on "wheels" 
last summer. A party of professors and 
undergraduates traveled alniut ten thou- 
sand miles in a Pullman car in order to 
make a thorough study of the geology 
and the natural resources of the United 
States. 



There's a treat for you and 
your children in the Pepper- 
mint sugar jacket and another 
in the Peppermint • flavored 
gum inside — that is 

WRIGLEY'S P. K. 

utmost value in long 

l-i-it-l-n-i delight. 



Harold 
VVATr.K. 

reptlon of the "Praah 
man" thin wae considered 
the grealeal comedy ever 
rod in ed 
me and nee him in "Hot 
Water." Nrw „ 



EZ 




I'M HERE 
TELL YOU 
THEY'RE GOOD 



Wrigley'a aids diges- 
tion and makes the 
next cigar taste better. 
Try It 
Aftmr Emmry AfW 
C129 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open' for the season of *26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 



120 Pleasant St., 

First h ouse south of campus. 

Telephone 511 



The total first day's enrollment at 
Harvard University when registrations 
closed recently was 7106, as compared 
with fH)55 at the corresponding time last 
year, setting ■ new record for the first 
day of the acade m ic year. Late registra- 
tions will considerably increase this total 
in most departments. 



Tufts University has added a new list 
of courses to its usual schedule. I framatic 
Technique ami Modern Kn^lisli Writing 
are included among several other of the 
new courses. This was br ough t about by 
the unanimous vote of the juniors and 
seniors. 



J 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to to and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream Milk Shakes. Fresh Fruits. Refreshments and 'Sodas. 
Salted Nuts. Pafte & Shaw. Park & Tilford. Boies Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

Id CRKAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIOIIT DINNRR 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 



JUST ARRIVED—NEW SHIPMENT OF 

Leather Jackets, Wind Breakers, Lumber Jackets===Don , t forget our snappy line of Golf Hose 

QINSBURG'S, 10 Pleasant St. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

b. A. C. Stationery 

fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



w cents 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

Ni'W 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. | 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



G. Edward Fisher 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

========= ^' w^dealer and Stationer 

|0VEr RGOATS===P'enty of the new blues in all wool coats $25 to $60. Sheepskin 

lined coats $9 to $35. Windbreakers $5 to $20. Dogskin Coats $50 
F jVl. THOMPSON & SON Clothes for Aggie Men for Forty Years 

PIIS FALL'S BUSINESS in... ' 

^ u its and Overcoats has been the best ever for us. We have just what the Doctor ordered and have cashed in accordingly 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HYANNIS 

AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3, 1926 



the 



FIGHTING AGGII TIAM 

Continued from I'afte 1) 
savag- dash of Captain Cadigan 



NOTFBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in 
prls BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



the year right at reasonable 



remitted in a tatty. Two other Ciedea I 

Walker lorwards were responsible for the 
next touchdown which *<><>" followed. 

Cartwright kicked off at the opening 

of the second half, but Creden out- 
generaled the Agates by railing for a 
punt on the first play, and the ball rolled 
far back towards the goal. Several short 
gains returned it nearer the middle of t In- 
field, but Cook was forced to leave the 
game at this point because of a sprained 
ankle. A toss from ('adigan to Creden, 
and a ■pectacuktf litave to Morse placeil 
the leather beyond the 0-stri|>e for the 

visitors. 

The final quarter was marked by fre- 
quent attempts at the aerial game by 
both teams, and just as frequent inter- 
cepted forwards, the main difference 
being that the Amherst players twice 
fumbled after intercepting, and Captain 
Amstein and Howie recovered. When 
Captain Cadigan dropped Tufts' punt, a 
general scramble ensued, but Murdough 
finally grasjx-d the ball and [rushed his 
way to a score. Cartwright then added 
the extra |K>int. 

Captain Amstein and Murdough were 
outstanding in a line which, although 
greatly outweighed, acquitted itself very 
creditably. Tufts and Mahoney con- 
tributed the spectacular ball-carrying, 
while the latter and Quinn also featured 
defensively. Captain Cadigan, Creden, 
and Walker were star reformers for the 
Amherst aggregation. Frequent penalties 
pnd prolonged huddling lengthened the 
contest. The lineup: 
1 Amherst M.A.C. 

Britton, Morse, le re, McKittrick 

Baldwin, Kenton, Carroll, It < 

rt, Amstein 

Wilbur, HigginS, lg 'g, Cartwright 

Whitney, Richardson, c c, Mills 

faith, A. 1'arker, rg lg, Anderson. Black 
Shankwilcr, Nelson, rt It, Murdough 

Walker, Mahoney, re le, Howie 

Creden, Cadigan, Merrill, qb qb, Cox 

Priddy, L. Parker, lhb ^ rhb, Tufts 

W. Parker, StaufTer, rhb \ 

lhb, Mahoney, Nitkiewicz, Maertl, 

Johnson 

Felt, Cadigan. L Parker, fb 

fb, Cook, Quinn 
; Score: Amherst 21, M.A.C. 7. Touch- 



YE AGGIE INN 



downs: Cadigan, Walker, Morse, Mur- 
dough. Points after touchdowns: Walker 

8, Cartwright. Referees J. '"- Keegaa. 

Umpire: S. A. Peterson. Linesman: P. 
Shea, field judge: A. W. Keane. |TfaMl 
four 15-iniiiute |>eriods. 



Freshman Eleven Wins 

Over Two-Year Team 



Losers Unable to fc Score Against 
Alert Yearling Aggregation. 



"Pay your tuition in ham, » ggs, sor- 
ghum, 'butter, bacoa or what have you, 
is the slogan ol Mountain Home ( ollege, 
Arkansas. 1 1 a prospective student has 
noi the Decenary wherewithal to pay for 
hi* tuition, he may pay in produce, roe 

college caters chiefly to mountaineers. 

Whether professon are also paid with 

■labs Of bacon or gallons ot sorghum is 
not made clear. Sate to say the peda- 
gogues enjoy the flavor ol the home cured 

meats and home grown products.— Minn- 
esota Daily. 

The University of Sydney, Australia, 
is sending a team ol debaters to the 

United States this Fall \» extensive 
schedule has been arranged. 1 heUntver- 
itty of Mexico City will send a debating 
team later in the year. 




Shoes and Hosiery 

For Every College 
Event 



You will find an eicellant 

. . . SHOE RKPA1RINC SHOP ... 
equipped with the most up-to-date Coodyeur 
Machinery and it modern 
■HOI SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-S«.. - Opp. New Theatre 

It e understand your requiremtnls and art pre- 
pared lo meet your needs. 
Mi u,rk guaranteed Shoes shintd and dyed. So 
VINCENT CRANDONICO. Prop. 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Maes 

Our laundry First Class 

' Our Pellcy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 

PRICES. . _ g\&i 

Opposite Post Office 



The annual clash between the freshman 
and Two- Year football teams which took 
place on Alumni Field last Friday re- 
sulted in a 16-0 victory for the neophytes. 
The freshman eleven proved too fast for 
the Shorthorns who were kept on the 
defensive during a large part of the game. 
The scoring started on the second play 
of the game when Kneeland ran 20 yards 
for a touchdown which he followed up by 
a dropkick for the extra point. Kneeland 
also accounted for the second score by 
dropkicking a field goal from the 20-yard 
line near the end of the second quarter. 
The second touchdown was made in the 
third period by Ellert who, aided by 
excellent interference on the part of his 
,,.,m-n.atcs. crossed the Two- Year goal 
from the" 35-yard Jine. * During the rest 
of the game the frosh made several drives 
deep into Two- Year territory but were 
unable to score again. IThe game ended 
with the ball on'the Two-Ycar 1-yard line. 
During he game, Bond, Ellert, and 
Kneeland were retpOsUsfat* for most of 
the ground gained by the Freshmen while 
the center trio, Nelson, Morawski and 
Crane proved a big factor on the defense 
by stopping the heavy Two-Year back 
(iadory for short gains. The frosh com- 
pleted several forward passes from Knee- 
land or (iiandomenico to Burbank. 
Pulsifer and Caffrey played a good game 
for the Two- Years. 



Orisere nearly 100 percent wrong and 

men only 46 percent in estimating how 

long it will take them to dress or do any- 
thing else, according to tests made at 
seven universities by Johns Hopkins 
psychologists. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 



275 High St., Holyoke 



Say "JOHN FOTOS" when you are 
in NEED of a pair of nice OXFORDS. 
Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Hot Waffles with Maple Syrup - Homemade Doughnuts 

Sandwiches - Ice Cream Sodas - Milk Shakes - Sundaes 

Smokes — Candies — Tobaccos 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 




AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We have the most complete line 
of College Shoes in Amherst, and 
at the most reasonable prices. 

$5, $6, $7 50, $10. 



The most welcome call 

to smoke ever sounded 






B0LIES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET 



NEVER was there a smoke invita- 
tion that could compare with 
"Have a Camel!" 

On swirling city streets. In the 
roadster as it bounds over the hills. 
In the study or by the fireside, no 
other smoking phrase is so pro- 
vocative of enjoyment and friend- 
ship. In its realization comes a 
boundless sense of gratitude and 
contentment. 

That is because Camels are the 
favored smoke of millions of ex- 
perienced and successful men. To 



ever-increasing millions who have 
tried them all, who could well 
afford to pay more, Camels are the 
first and only choice. Since the 
dawn of smoking, there has never 
been a success like Camel's. 

Camel preference is the inevi- 
table expression of Camel quality. 
No other cigarette made is like 
Camels. No other smoke was ever 
so smooth and mellowy mild. For 
your own high pleasure, we invite 
you to rise to the world's most cele- 
brated smoke call. Have a Camel! 



AMHERST 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C, 



Q1926 



Overcoats aiid Mufflers 

- - A wide selection for the cold days ahead - 

SOUTHWICK 



BROS. & GAULj 



I FREE 

CR-\NK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

{SUPPLY LIMITED) 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



Sfo MnBBUt^mHtB (Bollnitatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10, 1926 



Number 7 



Annual Flower Show 

Creates Much Interest 



More Than 1000 Visitors at Fine Floral Exhibition Arranged 

by Floriculture Club 



Last Sunday brought to a s u c c es s ful 

close ll't' annual fall llowcr show, which 

even surpassed the record-breaking <li- 
• ,l.i -v <>f la>t year. From it* opening 
Saturday morning till its close Sunday 
ning will over 1000 people visited the 
exhibit an<l expressed their praise Ear the 
work of the Floriculture Club, under 
whose auspices the show was planned. 
I in- marks the first year thai the Club 

has been alone in arranging the show. 
I lie three rooms, in which the exhibits 

u, re lielil, were mo-t .11 tislicallv decorated 
,,ih1 -.poke well for the ability of the mem- 
bers. 

One of the rooms wa> arranged to 
represent a comer of a formal garden. 

Cedar and juniper trees lined the walls, 
forming a background for bade of chrys- 
anthemums, which predominated 

throughout the show. The BOWCll Were 
arranged in beds of solid colon with a 
few larger flowers separating them from 
the evergreens. Several pieces of garden 
furniture added to the decorative scheme, 
nd, with the sod placed around the edges 
of the tlower beds, made a most ivali-ti< 
11 s( ene. In another room live 
table- were set for dinner and decorated 
with tloral center-pieces, which formed a 
competition. First prize was awarded to 
Hilda If. (ioller '27, second to Mae 
Wiggins '27 and third to Allen F. Small, 
Graduate Student. The walls of the 
room were draped with pa|K-r and in the 
windows were hung yellow curtains. 
Window boxes containing suitable flowers 
tad plants helped to decorate the room 
and a model bouquet of fall flowers added 
to the scheme. 

The last room contained many interest- 
ing features, not the least of which was 
tlie exhibition of specfanena of Charles 
Raaer, Rose Perfection, and Major 
Boaafaa chrysanthemums which were 
dupkyed in a pergola arrangement. 
Another novelty was the living picture of 
Rose Perfections, which was very artisti- 
cally exhibited and effectively lighted. 

In this room there were also two 
(<mi|Ktitions for students, which attracted 
(on-iderable notice, one for the arrange- 
ment of flowers in vases and bowls and 
the other for the display in baskets. In 
the first competition Olive Allen '28 won 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 



SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 

FOR YEAR ANNOUNCED 



Several of Entertainers 
Familiar Here. 



Already 



The Social Union Committee has just 
announced the following entertainments 
for the coming year: 
Friday, Dec. 3 — Cotter's Saturday 
Night. 
10 — Aggie Revue. 
7 — Edwin M. Whitney. 
16 — Boston Chamber 

Music Club (pending) 
28— Pitt F. Parker, 

Cartoonist and Soloist. 
11 — Professor Charles H. 
Patterson. 
Friday, Feb. 25— M.A.C. Glee Club. 
Mar. 11 — Meistersingers. 



Friday, Dec. 
Friday, Jan. 
Sunday, Jan. 

Friday, Jan. 

Friday, Feb. 



Frid 



ay, 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"Words are leaves, and where they 
"tost abound 
■Much fruit of sense beneath is 
rarely found." 

— Alexander Pope 



Wednesday — 

••00 Razoo Night, Ravine. 
Night Shirt Parade. 
Thursday — Armistice Day. 

Interfraternity Conference 

Meeting. 
Outing Club Meeting. 
Sunday 

» 10 Sunday Chapel. Bishop Francis 
J. McConnell, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Monday 

1-ngland Intercollegiate CrOSS- 

uitry Meet, Boston. 



M.A.C. OUTING CLUB 

HAS FIRST MEETING 



Adoption of Constitution and Elec^ 
tion of Officers Takes Place. 



The organisation meeting of the ( luting 
Club was held ill the Memorial Building, 

Thursday evening, October 28, with 

about fifty present. The constitution 

Was approved and the officers wen 

elected. The const it tit ion was modeled 

in certain respects alter that <>i the 

Dartmouth (Kiting Club. The name 

chosen was "The M.A.C. Outing Club". 

File object of the elnb, a- stated in t he 

constitution is "the prornotion in the 

College of camping, hiking, mountain 
climbing, snow shoeing, skiing, wood 

craft, and similar outdoor activities." 

The o ffice rs were elected to serve the 

Min. tinder ol this college Vcai and are: 
president, J. Kmcr-on ( .reeii.iuav '27; 
vice-president, Walter F. Sonthwirk '20; 

se cr e tary , Laurence A Carruth '29; ami 

treasurer, Arthur H. Gravel '_".». The 

constitution provides lor a cabin com 

mittee, a trail committee and an activ it it s 

committee, tin- chairmen of which an 

Walter Suit h wick, Edwin F. Whit mote, 

and Everetl S. Henderson re sp ectively. 

A committee on general policy is also 
provided for in the constitution. This 

committee auperviswj the activities of the 

Club and consists of the four student 
Continued on Pafte 4) 



PLANS FOR POULTRY SHOW 

NOW WELL UNDER WAY 



The Tenth Annual Market Poultry and 
Egg Show will be held in Stockbridge Hall, 
Boom 312 on NnvemlMT 22 and fj, 
Form letters have been sent out to 
solicit exhibits from various sources and 
sections of the state and country. The 
show should prove interesting to all who 
take advantage of the educational value 
of such an event. 



YEARLING ELEVEN 

MEETS FIRST DEFEAT 



Frosh, Outweighed, Make Game 
Fight Against Strong Greenfield 
Team. 



The freshman football team received 
its initial defeat at the hands of Green* 
field High last Saturday on the latter's 
home field. Although heavily outweighed, 
Phil Couhig's boys were by no means 
outclassed, and it was with the greatest 
difficulty that the strong Greenfield 
eleven managed to pile up a 12-0 score. 

The teams played on even terms in the 
first period, but in the second several 
penalties for off-side brought the ball far 
into freshman territory. A forward pass 
followed by another penalty brought the 
ball to the freshman one-yard line and 
Pelaski of Greenfield took the ball across. 
A forward pass from near mid-field in the 
third period gave a Greenfield end the 
opening for the second touchdown. 
Greenfield was kept on the defensive 
during the rest of the game and barely 
missed being scored on in the third period 
when the freshmen carried the ball to the 
Greenfield one-yard line only to lose it 
on the fourth down. 

The lineup: 

Greenfield Freshmen 

Shattuck, le re, Burbank 

C. Murphy, It rt, Warren 

T. Burnham, Newman, T. Burnham, lg 

rg, Tel son 
Maniatty, c c, Morawski 

Nuns, rg lg. Crane 

Anson, rt It. Drew 

Bonitski, re le, Goldberg, Babson 

COWUU, Ufa qb. Kneeland 

T. Harris, Yickery, lhb rhb, Bond 

Donovan, P. Murphy, rhb lhb, Kllert 

ivkalski, fb fb, Guandeifteico 

Score: Greenfield 12, M.A.C. Froth 0. 

Referee: McDonnell. Umpire: Erichsott. 

Linesman: Foley. Time: four 10-miniitc 

periods. 



HELP SEND THE BAND 
TO TUFTS 



We want t.. -end the band to the 
lulls gaiiu . Let's Support the team 

by sending the band along with the 
chee ring a i tion. In order to do it 

evel voile lllll-t do hi- -hale. \e\t 

Monda) night mu\ Tuesday, tap will 

■ 'i -ale at lie .1 tit;. I rate* nit) 
nun should ^et their- at the fraternity 
meeting, Noa-fraternit) men should 

get their- at the Dining Hall or from 
the cheerleaders. Coed- should get 
their- in the Abbe) center Monday 

night. Anv help l'i the faculty will 

be appreciated. In tleXt wee!.'- ("»»/- 
Ugtan group results will be published. 
Let's see which group will have the 

highest percentage. 

I \ n Mile wear In- tag on Tucsdav ! 



Frosh Win Rope Pull 

by Narrow Margin 

Sophomores, Citable to Move Heavier 
Opponents, lose by Less Than Foot. 



Aggie on Loser's End 

in Game at Spring ~"eld 



Home TuflUH Moots Strong Defense But Invaders 

ossury Punrh 



HARRIERS' VICTORY 

SETS NEW RECORD 

Ajivib- Team, rndefeated in Five 

Races, Should Make Good Showing 
in Intercollegiates. 



The annua] freshman sophomore six 

man ro|>c pull, which was held Last 
Thursda) after Assembly, was won by 
the freshmen, but as usual, the margin 
oi viitotv wa- extremely -mall, in this 
■ a-e something le— than a loot. The 
outcome wa- not wholU unexpected, foi 

the freshmen outweighed their opponent - 
considerably, and alter they succeeded 
in getting the jump, the cast- of the 
-econd-vcar nun was nearly ho|H-less. 
'Continued on I'.mo 2) 



ART EXHIBITION 

JUDGED BY EXPERTS 



Group of Local I eacbers and Authors 
Discuss Merits of Various Pictures. 



A group of well-known men held an 
informal di-cussion on Monday night 
Concer n ing the merits of the pictures in 
the exhibition which has Ix-en on display 
for the last few weeks. Those who 
attended this discussion were Ray Stan- 
Continued on Pafte 2) 



Speakers Announced 

For Sunday Chapel 

Many Noted Men to Address Student 
Boby During Com in ft Year. 



The defeat of B.U. at Franklin Para 
la-t Saturday, brings the cross-country 
team to the close ol an undefeated season. 
\ record <>i five win- in live races, includ- 
ing contests with all the little Three, 

proves < oacll I >elb\ *S team to lie prob.ilik 

tin strongest in western Massachusetts, 
rhis is the first time that an M. A.C. cross 

loiintiv team ha- reached tin- end o| ,i 

five rate schedule undefeated, though thr 
IU22 team hung up a record of three win-, 
no defeat 

I In iaee w it h 15.1 . wa- one ol l lie 

closest ol the season, being won b) .1 
-cant three points for 1 score of 26 29. 

( otiilmieil on I'.mi' 2i 



\ n Nec- 

• r-' 

• & 
3 

3 K a (ou- 
ter which 
out t he 
lo II in ,1 
ptniftfield last 



Employment Office 

Doing Good Work 

Many Students Aided in Search for 
Employment by New Agency. 



November 7, Rev. Robert R. Wicks 
Holyoke, Mass.; 14, Bishop Francis J. 
McConnell, Bishop Methodist ffpiaOQpal 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa.; lil, Dr. William 
I. Chamberlain, Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions, New York City. 

December 5, Dr. Nehemiah Boynton, 
Newton Centre, Mass.; 12, Bishop Thom- 
as F. Davies, Springfield, Mass. 

January 9, Prin. Alfred E. Stearns, 
Andover, Mass.; 16, Dean Charles R. 
Brown, Yale University, New Haven, 
Conn.; 23 Rev. J. H. Nolan, Springfield, 
Mass.; 30 Bishop Edwin II. Hughes, 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Chicago, 
III. 

February 6, Rev. Kenneth C. Mac- 
Arthur, Cambridge, Mass.; 13, Rev. 
William Horace Day, The United Church, 
Bridgeport, Conn.; 20, Bishop William 
F. Anderson, Maiden, Mass.; 27, Rev. 
Harry P. Nichols, New York City. 

March 6, Mr. Albert E. Rolx-rts, New 
York City; 13, Dr. D. Brewer Eddy, 
Boston, Mass. 

April 3, Mr. Joseph H. Twichell, 
Williams College, Williamstown, Mass.; 
10, Mr. Paul D. Moody, Middlebury 
College, Middlebury, Vt.; 17, Faster 
Sunday; 24, Rev. J. H. Randall, New 
York City. 

May 1, Rev. Samuel A. Fliot, American 
Unitarian Association, Boston, Mass. 



Under the auspices c4 the new Employ- 

mi nt mine, in charge of Fbner Barber, 

Inter-Chun h S ■cretarv of M.A.C, three 
mi II have been plaeed in |x rniaiieiit 
poaitJoM and aliout fifty leni|)orary 
|H>sitions have been tilled. The UsBCC 
Inst began its work on October IK, follow- 
ing an announcement in one of the 
Springfield pa|K-rs, and since then has 
been able to place the numerous appli 
(ants successfully. 

This is the first time that an oilier 
of this sort has 1 ver been ( ondn. ted at 
the college. Formerly, students desiring 
teni|K>rary work had to seek help from 
the President's Office or the Short Course 
Office, and |>coplc desiring student I.iIk.i 
were never certain where to place their 
demand-. It has Ix-cn found that people 
are willing to give temporary labor to the 
students and an agency of this sort has 

been deesned •• raaJ necessity. 

Students desiring lalior should keep an 
eye on the bulletin Iniard outside the 

office of the M.A.C.C.A. secretary, where 

positions to In- tilled will lx- posted as 
soon as they come in. 



AGGIE TEAM TO REST 
BEFORE TUFTS GAME 



No Game This Week 

Hone to Redeem Unsuccessful Sea 

sons. 



INDEX PICTURES 
FOR SUNDAY, NOV. 14 



10.15 — Joint Committee on 

Intercollegiate Athletics 
10.30 — Debating Team 
10.45 — Junior Prom Committee 
1 1.00 — Informal Committee 
I hi- is the final Sunday for group 
pii t tires. 



The M.A.C. football squad will enjoy 
a week-end of rest this Saturday, for no 
game has been scheduled. This welcome 
vacation will afford an opportunity for 
the injured to recuperate so that the 
strongest possible lineup will face Tufts 
at Medford in the final encounter of the 
season on November 20. 

"Jack" Quinn, who suffered a con- 
cussion of the brain and an injury to his 
leg in the Springfield game, has recovered 
from the concussion. The exact nature 
(jf the injury to his limb has not yet In en 
determined, but he will hf confined to 
the infirmary for a few days at l< 
Cwk is still limping on his bad ankle 
which kept him out of the Springfield 
encounter, ami Cox is nursing a S t rain e d 
leg also. 

Tufts has defeated only Lowell Ted 
and Bowdoin, but the Jumbos have 
faced three strong elevens in Vermont, 
New Hampshire, and Harvard. A Iwtter 
judgment of their present power may In- 
formed after the B.U. game which they 
play thrs Saturday. It will b ■ remcmlx red 
that Springfield defeated the Terriers 

before co nqu er in g the Agates. 
Tufts, counting a season successful if 

it includes a vietory over M.A.C., is 

t for revenge for the '» I defeat at 

the hands of the Aggies last fall and is 
|M»intin : .; for the contest with the Maroon 
and White. 



Springfield College, u 

> ei ted attai k in the I'm, 

netted a touchdown, 

Agate eleven b\ a - 

defensive contest at 

Sat 111 <l.i\ 

The lv><l and White was in the lead, 

3 to o, until 1 he final minute ol play, 
when Mahnkea finally plunged ovet the 
goal line aitei three attempts bom the 
3 v.. id stripe, li was Mahahcn's ■■*• 
which save Springfield ii- earhur lead 
with a placement ki< k from the 25-yard 

line in tin -i ( ond 011.11 I. 1 

The M \ I 1, \, n started of with ■ 
rush in the opening period and made 
three successive hi-t downs, but ■ fumble 
on Springfield's 32-yard hue ended this 
march. Haertl and Johnson alternated 
in advancing the aval, but Thompson's 
altertness in reco v ering a fumble brought 
then advance to .\n untimely end. 

\ 20-yard pass from Smith to Craig 
gave the Home ' itv players the ball <>n 
the Aggie 20-yard siii|>e m the n< \t 

period, but Smith ami Mahnken could 
make no substantial gains, so the latter 

dropped back and lilted a placement lor 
1 he initial scon 

Springfield then Inched off, and Haertl 
received the leather and brought it back 
to the 87-yard stripe. No down- were 

forthcoming lot either side, however, 

until Smith passed to Bolliet aeai th<- 

close of the half. 

The third |>criod saw lx>t h elevens 
mainly on the defensive, a dash aiound 
right end by Sleeves, and a long punt by 
Tufts being the principal feature-. I lie 

heavy Springfield line cams into its own 

on the last few plays, though, and nailed 
Haertl and Johnson behind the line for 
considerable lo-- • 

Springfield Sjpauod the final purled 
with a determined attack, but received 
a 12. r > yard penalty which forced them far 
back into their own territory. Sleeves 

contributed an avcaftent punt at this 

|K)int, and Craig halted Tufts, who re- 
ceived the ball, l»cfnrc the Aggie player 

could advance. The RotluKkerman soon 

gained |»osse— ion of the oval and tailed 
a anarch for the goal which was interrupted 
only by the interception of a jxiss by 
"Cliff" Johnson. A clever triple pass 
from Smith to Steeves to Johnson (of 
Springfield; enab led the latter to skirt 
the M.A.C. right end and da-h to the 
.'{•yard line, from whence Mahnken tallied 
on the fourth attempt after swapping of 
<juarterba< ks by the attaekers. His try 
for the extra point was a failure. 

The Aggie line outclassed their oppo- 
nents in the first parlcd, but the necessary 
Both Teams I punch for a score was lacking. Haertl 
and Quinn featured in the bark field, the 
former in carrying the ball, the latter in 
effectually halting the Springfield backs. 
Kelton, Walkden, and Kvans, saw their 
first extended service of the season, and 
Continued on Page 2 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

ELECTS NEW OFFICERS 



The officers for the class of 1929 for 
the cur r a nt college year are as follows: 
William Kolx-rtson of Port Chester, N. 

Y., president; John B. ZieKnshi Jr., of 
Holyoke, vice-president ; Ehaabeta A. 
I.vik h of Easthamptoa, sei retary; Taylor 

M. Mills of Boston, treasurer; Dennis M. 
Crow l e y Of Boston, sergcatit-at-arms; and 

Clifton K. Johnaoa of W or c es t er , captnla. 



RAZOO MCI IT 



We wish to apologize for the mis- 
take in last week', issue in regard to 
Kazoo Night and asUsOUUCS that it 
will lake place tonight. The event- 
are scheduled to ha tm, • a the nuns 

plan as last year. The Ixixing and 
wrestling bouts will < mini, in e as soon 
after Supper as is deemed advi-able. 
following the Itouls, both < la— is will 
adjourn to the at li 'ii Id, where 

the s ophomo res wiHlatte\npt to re- 
move the nocturnal regt lis of the 
neoph) t' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10, 1926 









TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, I'uphshed eviry 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
William L. Dole '27 Kditor-in-Chief 

Ellswokth Baknakd "2K 



DEPARTMENT BDtTOM 

Editorial William L. Dolu '27 

Athletic. HAKOLi. K. CLAW "* 

W. GOMHW III N IKK ■ 

Campus News Kbnkst L. Sprnckk jH 

Faculty & Short CottTMf Edwaki» H. Nichols '29 
Intercollegiate Editor Euancks C. Bkick *) 
Co-EdNews J..SMMIINK I'anzka 28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Charlks F. Clacg '27 Business Manan.-r 

Lewis H Whitakkk 27 Aclvertisinn ManagM 
JoiTn E White '27 C irculation M anager 

DO"CLAS W. 1/)KIN(. "28 

Edwin A. Wilukk '28 

Hakolo K. Anseil *2» 

Lawrence A. ( arri hi 29 

William A. Ecan '29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. A, cepted for «•»'««. •'< "•EJJ/R? 
of ix.stage provide.! for In section 1 10. . Act of Oo 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



TRIM TUFTS 

On the front page of this talc of tkt 
COLLEGIAN is a not ire of tag day next 
Monday. It Si hoped that enough will 
be nali/iil from this effort to send the 
band to Tufts. But what good is I Land 

going to do wlun it outnumber! the 
■Indent body? Of course we have ex- 
aggerated, but the Mand in A>scml>ly 
last week was not re.i-Mii ing, to say the 
lemet. Uel ye« •« had an organization 
on the CUnpttI known as the TT Club. 
Before the Tuftt gain.- we all wt nt to 

one of the beet mam meeting" that 
M..YC. has •ritoeeaed for eeveral yenrt. 
If you do not fed that the Tnfte gam.' m 
an Important pine, hnrh beck one year. 
There is bo mo eon in the world why \\<- 
should not rapport our team this year. 
ju-t became it is in Mcdford n no alil.i 

at all. There are plenty of kind hearted 
automobile drivers on the road. There 
are plenty of your friends who live near 
Boston, and probably some of thum art- 
going to drive. The freshmen were 
noticeably absent, among those who stood 
in Assembly. No doubt they needed only 
a little urging. Let's all give it to them. 
We hope that this stand had little signifi- 
cance. Let us all sup'wrt the team. 
Trim Tufts. Trim Tufts. And we'll all 
help. We'll all be there. How about it? 



Are you willing to admit that you yourself 
are in this same category? Or do you 
know anyone whom you would wish to 
accuse of holding such an attitude as we 
have deecrtbad? 

It may be that we are obtuse, or 
prejudiced, or idealistic, or something 
else; but it is difficult to believe that 
Mass. Aggie is in such a lamentable 
situation. Let us ask ourselves a few 
queetkMM. Is it reasonable to assume 
that the many men who are working to 
earn part of their expenses, and the few 
who by endless slaving and drudging are 
able tO earn all their ex |K uses— that these 
men are here simply because they do not 
know what else to do? If such were the 
case, is it probable that many students 
would go out for athletics, which are 
nine-tenths drudgery even for the stars, 
and nearly all drudgery for the majority? 
Or that any student would take up work 
in certain academic activities, which are 
all work, without any reward? Or that 
a student would study until the early 
hours of morning, fighting against an 
overwhelming desire to sleep, in order 
that he may stay in college? Or even 
that he may do a little better than to 
get by? Tor these things are done, you 
know, even though you don't hear much 
about them. And finally, in view of past 
exiH-rience, do you think that a college 
course at M.A.C. is the eaeieet possible- 
way to spend four years? 

It is hard to bebeve that circumstances 
on the campus are as de sperate h indi- 
cated by the statement to which we 
referred at the beginning, bttt it may be 
that the subject is worth a few minutes 
thought, sometime when you have noth- 
ing else to do! 

K. B. 



PERSONALS 



FACULTY NOTES 



"What Else Is There To Do?" 

We heard it asserted not long ago by a 
student in a certain class, and admitted 
by the other niemliers of the class, that 
the majority of the students at M.A.C . 
are here simply because somebody wanted 
them to come; that they merely said 
"What else is there to do?", and came. 
It seems to u> that I hers is in this state- 
ment considerable food for thought for 
those of us who occasionally take the 
trouble to think. Let u* for a moment, 
if possible, be deaf to the demands upon 
our time made by our various activities 
— athletics, academics, movies, dance-, 
card games, "bullfests", or even studies— 
and consider the facts involved in this 
statement. It means, put into other 
words, that more than half of the stu- 
dents at M.A.C. are here without any 
idea of what they are here for, without 
any definite p S S pO SS whatever; not 
merely that they come here without any 
definite knowledge of what particular 
line of work they will pursue; or that 
they come with the general idea of de- 
riving material gain — these things are 
often true — but that they come without 
any aim, simply drifting, following the 
line of bast re si stan c e , thinking that 
college IS as good a place as any Other to 
throw away four years ot their lives an<l 

a superfluity of money. It means thai 

more than half of the Students with 

whom you associate on the campus are 
loafers, drifter*, parasites; absolutely 
•elfish, absolutely useless to themselves 

or anyone eisej sa ti s fie d to get as low 
marks as will allow them to in 

college, refusing to work even fof these, 
in the knowledge thnl it th< y flunk out . 
thc\ can find ■ place where fool 

part with their tin id in'. in \ h 

eaaUy than at MA < . 

01 course wt are all aware thai thisjclosun 

n the opinion v.Iih li the general pub 



EDITORIAL COM M BNT 

The University of New Hampshire and 
The University of Maine engaged in a 
new kind of battle a few weeks ago thai 

•lipped by us in the newepapers. A sham 

battle was Btaged between the R.O.T.4 

Units of the two colleges. We can imagine 

that the rivalry was keen and that the 
battle was well worth while from the 
military instructor's point of view. 'Then 
is little doubt that military is relatively 
rmpopular at M.A.C. If the Maine 
outfit would journey all the way from 
Oman to Durham, we certainly ought to 
be able to find an enemy for our unit. 
Perhaps this feature is all that is needed 
to bring our course into greater favor. 
* * * 

We have definitely adopted Middlebury 
as a iH-rmanent rival in baselwll and it is 
rumored that we are to meet the Midd- 
men in football. With this in mind, we 
feel that it is not out of order to learn a 
little about our new rivals. Middlebury 
ha* an enrollment of 610 this year. This 
includes the largest freshman class in its 
history, in spite of stricter entrance re- 
quirements. However, Middlebury's malt- 
population is probably smaller than that 
at M.A.C. because Middlebury is nearly 
GO", co-ed. A college well worth getting 
acquainted with, as the_'2u baseball team 
will testify. 



Russ Noyes '24 is at the Harvard 
Ciraduate School. 

V 

In the Manufacturer's Record for Oct. 
S, appears an important article by E. S. 
Drajier '15, on "Textile Mill Village 
Development in the South." This con- 
tains some of the important enterprises 
for which Mr. Draper has supplied plans. 

Slip Loud '26 is teaching and coaching 
at the Kingston, Mass., High School. 

P 

A. J. Tetreault '24 is employed on 
landscaiK- and engineer work with the 
Eastern Cuba Sugar Corporation, Pina, 
Cuba. 

P 

Bill Stoppford is employed with the 
Bartlett Tree Surgery Company. 

P 

John Kenton '24 has the jiosition of 
marketing socialist formerly held by 
T. Y. Waugh 22 and is located at the 
State Office, Trenton, N.J. 

P 

Cap Coles '22 is with the New York 
Central Railroad. 

P 

Carl Fraser '26 writes that he is a dirt 
farmer at Westboro, Mass. 

P 

Harry Fraser '26 is an engineer and 
landscape architect with the firm of 
Morse and Dickinson, Haverhill, Mass. 

P 

George Church '-"» is studying botany 
at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences. 

P 

Larry Lockhart '22 is in the jewelry 

business. 

P 



Dean Machmer spoke before an assem- 
bly of parents and teachers in the town 
of Hatfield, Tuesday night. His subject 
was, "Educational Values and Oppor- 
tunities." This address was made in 
connection with the observance of Na- 
tional Education Week which is being 
observed this week. Dean Machmer is 
also going to speak tonight at lladley 
before a similar meeting. 



AT THE ABBEY 



Miss Yondcll who was operated on for 
appendicitis has resumed her duties in 
the Dean's office. 



Prof. Frank C. Moore attended a 
meeting of the New England Mathematics 
Teacher's Association held in Greenfield 
October 30. 



Dr. Arthur A. Beaumont was in 
Washington, D.C., the 29th and 30th of 
October where he served as a judge in a 
nation-wide competition between contra 
agricultural agents. This competition is 
being furthered by the soil improvement 
committee of the National Fertilizer 
Association. 



Y.W.C.A. held a husking bee in one of 
the college barns last Friday evening at 
7 o'clock, which many of the women 
faculty as well as the girls attended. The 
prize for the best costume was awarded 
to Miss Sophie Tucker, instructor in 
Rural Home Life, ami Inez Williams "60 
was chosen as the one having the MOM 
original costume. The freshmen kitchen 
band furnished the music, and refresh- 
ments were served by the commit! i, 
which consisted of Lois Bliss '29, chair- 
man; Elizabeth Love '28, Margaret 
Donovan '30, and Katherine Knight '30. 
M 

The Abbey held an "Open House Tea'' 
lor the members of the Faculty last 
Sunday afternoon from four to six o'clock 
under the auspices of the Y.W.C.A. All 
those who attended were invited to visit 
and to meet the girls in their rooms. 
Mrs. Marie B. Marsh poured and the 
Y.W.C.A. members acted as hostesses. 



The second of the series of faculty- 
parties was held on Saturday evening in 
the Memorial building. A large number 
w.re present and they found ways of 
passing the evening pleasantly either at 
the bowling alleys, at card tables, or by 
dancing to the music of Bates' orchestra. 



It may be of interest to the student 
body here that Amherst has adopted our 
"Oh" song. They sang it untiringly at 
the Unkm game hist Saturday. 



We continue to see sweaters in Assem- 
bly. If you must wear a sweater, don't 
wear a white one; it is too obvious. 
Lumber jackets can hardly be class*! I as 

coats, either. 

* * * 

A quotation from the late Cider Press: 



We bear that A! Snyder is transferring 
to a college near Boston. 
P 

Aleck Hudson is going out for track 

to strengthen his legs. 

Charlie Clagg Ik-Hcvcs in patronizing 
local industries. He has been known to 
make every trip on the Toont-rville, of an 
evening. 

P 

Following are the results of a campus 
census: 

The perfect poker face — Mullen. 
The best cheerleader— Kidder. 
The best shoe thrower — Nottebaert. 
The best hash slinger — Barnard. 
The noisiest soup eater — Black. 
The best song leader— Don Campbell. 
The best crutch slinger — Cook. 
The campus riding master — Amatt. 
The campus commuter — Haertl. 
The campus florist — Pickens. 

P 

Mike Sharp is teaching at the Inter- 
national College in Springfield. 

P 

We have it on authority that Sam Rice 
is in love. 

P 

We wonder if Ken Rich will barrow 
Charlie Leonard's can again. The $25 
"rent'' was rather high! 

P 

Sarkis Kaffafian '26 and Ruth Wood 
'24 were married last June. Both are 
teaching at the Sea Pines School, Brewster, 
Mass. 

P 

Monty White '26 was married in 



FROSH WINS ROPE PULL 

(Continued from I'afte 1) 
After the puB had begun, however, the 

sophomores mowed superior technique, 

and at times gave their supporters hopes 
of victory. The disparity in weight was 
too great, however, and when the final 
gun was fired the frosh still UUIIlllirl a 
slight advantage. The members of the 
Opposing teams were as follows: 1929— 
Matthew L. Blaisdell, John S. Chadwick, 
Edgar W. Collins, William A. Day, 
Robert D. Kees, and Ernest C. Shuman; 
1930— GeorgB A. Barney, Reuben H. 
Call, Kendall B. Crane, John Jacobson, 
Wilfred G. Purdy, and Edward W. 
Tudryn. 

ART EXHIBITION JUDGED 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
nard Baker, Mr. Carter, Prof. Orton L. 
Clark, Mr. Walter Dyer, Prof. Laurence 
R. (.rose, Prof. Alexander A. Mackimmie, 
Prof Charles H. Patterson, Prof. Walter 
E. Prince, Prof. Frank P. Rand, Mr. 
Tore R. Swanbeck, and Prof. Frank A. 
Waugh, who was responsible for the 
exhibition. This group of men met 
informally and as a result of their dis- 
cussion the picture entitled "South Wind" 
by Cullen Yates was accorded first place. 
The picture entitled "Bonfire" received 
the next highest number of votes. The 
winning picture had an unusually soft 
effect which added much to its effect in t- 
BSSS. It was a picture of the mountains 
and conveyed much of the mystery which 
mountains in the distance often have 
when indistinctly outlined through the 
haze which a south wind brings. 



HARRIERS' VICTORY 

Continued from Page 1) 

The race was featured by the running of 
Swan who came up rapidly in the last 
mile, built up a big lead over Lockhart, 
the star B.U. runner, and finished first. 
Captain Crooks took fourth place, making 
one of his liest showings of the season 
Biron took fifth in a close finish with 
Cullen, captain of spring track at B.U, 
llenneberry, still showing the effects of 
poisoning by bad water, came in seventh. 
Preston finished ninth and Nottebaert 
thirteenth. 

With BUCh a remarkably successful 
araSOSl In-hind them the team should he 
able to make a gotxl showing at the 
New England Intercollegiates at Boston 
next Saturday, the last contest in which 
it takes part. 



PAPER CLIPS 

Strong, Artistic, Serviceable 

DESIRABLE FOR 

GIFTS 

—OR FOR 

YOUR OWN USE 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 

We sell stamps 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NR I'RICES 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - • • *i 5-' 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - • • « 

Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - • l-» 

Men's Half Soles •■*• 

Work Guaranteed— A MHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



Taboo Tufts 

Tackle Tufts 

Take Tufts 

Tether Tufts 

Trim Tufts 
etc. ad infinitum. 
And we second all Of these and rape* t- 

lullv add "TO TUFTS" meaning, < .O 
TO TUFTS, BUM TO TUFTS, GET 



Trounce Tufts 

Teach Tufts 
Totter Tufts 
Tumble T lifts 
Tread on Tufts 



TO 

HI 



I is SOMEHOW, BE A I 
and we will BEAT TUF IS. 



September to Miss Rachel Boutwell, 
Mt. llolyoke '26. Monty is superinten- 
dent of a iwultry farm in Ouxbury, Mass. 

P 

We wonder if "< lander" Amatt has 
ever been allowed to sit in on the Abbey 
•swing circle. He always has the latest 

gossip. 

Irene Bartlett was slightly injured last 
Monday afternoon when she was struck 
by an automobile while crossing the 
ravine. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Oculists Prescriptions Fitted. Broken lensst 

accurately replao.1 

BIG BEN AI ARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



\ 



lias of cols ■ • ,; probabM 

thai we ourselvct hoW a unulai opinion 
concerning the students ol certain other 
colleges. But to have it applied to 
II, \ < . is rathei different, is it not ? 



and silhouettes an- nltr.i- 

(ashkmable for freshmen. Harvard has 
decreed that all intrants shall undergo B 

pro© - whereby internal disorders are to 

be detected by X ray, and postural de- 
fects discovered by silhouette. Upon dis 

I li.iu- in posl lire, < orr< < t i\ e 

, .., hi- will be resoi ti d to. I his novi I 
hi ration, b) uncovering heart and lung 

and bj % ielding an a< ( mate ' • 
for postural corret rioa, ma) elevate < on 
•iderabiy the physical -tan'!. mis ol the 
institution, 



THE COLLEGE COLORS 

ON EVERY HIGHWAY 



Nineteen twenty seven will be s big 

yeal for Old Aggie. On every highway in 

the Stale, on every byway, on every road, 

the College Colors will be seen again and 
again. Day after da\ , frOBI one year's 

end to another, the old "maroon and 
white" will be everywhere. 
of course Commitsioner Goodwin, In 

Selecting maroon and while Jor lite 1927 

Massachusetts auto plates may not have 
had the College in mind. 'Then, again, he 

may baVC had, III say ease let lis make 
ih< most ol M.A.C.'- (Dining big year. 



AGGIE ON LOSER' S END 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
all acquitted themselves well. Captain 
Amstein showed up to good advantage 
against Captain Hafner of Springfield in 
a battle of tackles. 

The entire Springfield backfield co- 
operated in advancing the ball, although 
Mahnken gets credit for both scores. 
The speed of the ends, Bollier and Craig, 
in getting down under Sleeves' punts was 
particularly noticeable. The lineup: 

Springfield M.A.C. 

Craig, le «• McKittrich 

Hafner, It rt, Amstein 

Bartlett, lg rg. Kettoa, Cartwright, Black 
Thompson, c *\KN* 

Wherle. Leader, fg lg, Anderson 

Howe. Cbgstron, rl 

It, Walkden, Murdougn 

Boffier, re u '- ***** Umu ' 

ohnson, Davis, Knslee, Wilhelm, qb 

qb, Cjuinn, Coukous 
Steeves, llil. «* b ' J' ,l "' s,,n - ( ox 

Smith, rhl. »'»>, Haertl, Maboney 

Mahnken, Boughner, fl> 

fb, Tufts, Mahoney 

Score: Springfield 9, M.A.C.0. Touch- 
down: Malmls.n. Goal from the field: 

Mahnken (placement). Referee: R. ft 

Carpenter. Umpire: A. W. Keane. 
FieW judge: T. P. Shea. Uiiesman: 
j i . Fsrrel. Time: four 12-minute periods. 




Planning Ahead 

Reforestation work going on 
now assures a new supply ot 
timber when present resources 
fail. 

Planning ahead, investing m 
the Life Income Plan now. as- 
sures you a new source of i n " 
come when your chief present 
resource, your earning power, 
fails. 

The Plan guarantees $10? 
monthly for life from age?' 
on, and earlier whenever dis- 
abled. Same Plan inclua« 
$10,000 insurance meanwhile- 
Write for descriptive booklet. 

Connecticut General 
Lifelnsurance Company 

ROY D. HARRIS 

.0. Box 27;? Tel. J.ssnWi l* 7 *' 
Greenfield, Mass. 



You will find unusual and distinctive HABERDASHERY at 



THE HOUSE OF WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



"BOSTONIANS" 

Bostonians are designed for College men. 
Their style is correct and their quality the 
best. Come in and see them. 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



ALUMNI NOTE 

At (he annual legislative conference bald 
in Worcester, October -■*>. with sbonl 
thirty delegates from different agricul- 
tural organisations, there wars noted 
eleven Aggie alumni, one trustee <>i the 
College and live Esthers of pan <>i present 

Students. These were a-< follows: 

Alumni- E. I". Rlcaardaoo '87; I \ 
Smith '«.»;{; A. W. Gilbert, S. k. Parke/ 
and S. B. Haskell '<>4; W. A. Munson '06; 
1). J. Curran '13; George Fuller sad l>. 

\\. O'Brien '14s Russell '10; and Gil re, 

Special '<>'.». 

The trustee member present was Mr. 
C. D. Richardson of What Brookfield; and 

the "fathers" Messrs. K. 1'. Kieharilson, 

Smith, Bursary and ('. I). Richardson, 
members of the Advisory Board <>f the 
Massachusetts State Department of Agri- 
culture, In this list the two RJchardsons 

are counted twice K. I\ Kichanlson as 
both an alumnus ami a father, ('. D. 
Richardson as a trustee anil a father. 



Two- Years Beaten 

By Pittsfield High 



Victors, Unbeaten, Scored On For 
Second Time This Season. 



Red Mall's TwO-Yeat football team lost 

to the unbeaten I'ittstuld Ili^h eleven l>> 

a 20-7 score on Alumni lielil last Saturday. 

Pittsfield had things its own na) during 

the tirsi half and brought into use many 
trick plays resulting in a 13-0 seme .u 

the end of the half. In the second half 

however, tin Two Venn took the offen 

sist-. Starting on their own :i."i yard line 
they made an unbroken march down i!n- 

field. Butters, seconded by Peabody, 

carried the ball in a mri es of line plunges 
for consistent gains of three, four and li\< 
yards which soon brought the ball to the 

Pittsfield goal line-. Batters carried the 

liall across and followed it up by kicking 
the extra |>oint. This was tbf sec Ottd time 
this year that Pittsfield had been scored 
on. 

Again the Two- Years started their 
highly successful line plunging tactics and 
Massed well on the way to another touch- 
flown. But after reaching the Pittsfield 
25- yard line the ball was lost because of 
IHiialties. A long kick by Pittsfield and a 
Two-Year kick which went short brought 
the ball to the Two-Year M-yard line and 
the third touchdown resulted. For the 
rest of the game the teams took turns 
intercepting each others forward passes. 



INTllOOLLBGIATia 

The I'liiversity of Kansas has .in 

or gani sa ti on ha unman interested in 

wale i s|miiIs which is called the <Jii.uk 
Club. The following are the require 
incuts lor admission: to swim one fourth 
mile; tO swim three lengths ol the |xm>1 
each of the following strokes in good form: 
back stroke, side stroke, breast stroke, 

crawl, English over-arm and trudgeon, 

I he divas are standing front, running 
front and swan, back oi jacknile dive, 

also to Boat thirty feel and tread water 

three minutes. 



All uppei classmen at Dartmouth 

College' are- required to take- part in some 
athletic activity three' limes a week for 
the entire year. 

THOMPSON'S TIMELY TA1.KS 
Remington Portable and Corona 
Typewriters. Service on all type- 
writers. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHKKST HANK 




WRIGUVSu 



/Vew 



ewi 



WHIG LEYS 

3 handy packs 3^. 



Wrigley's Chewing Sweet 
helps teeth, mouth, throat 
and digestion in a delightful 
and refreshing way. Removes 
odors of smoking and eating. 
People of refinement use it. 

G130 





Values Extraordinary 
IN 

Leather and Suede 

Jackets 



I 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Thurs. 

S.M. 

6.4.1 s .l« 

Two 

Shows 
at Night 



Friday 

.1.00 
Mli s..to 



Saturday 

IN 
(MS S.3S 



W(*Mi4ir. Im is. IsSwm 
irsntxr M 



Kiiiln.el.l II. t i„ I AKK 

IT KROM ME." lorn Ku- 
ttcris shiieilil h.it 1- been hltf 
You tec he liihirlleel 1I..1I 
lite million dollar elrp.ill- 
mt-nl Mm, .mil hud tci loar 
money in ihree mondn, 
How (hit, inesiMiiislhle >e( 
lovithle h p e 11 ci l h r 1 1 1 Met 
uhnul »revkiii|i u peifei (!> 
sou ml himlneHN m.iWrs the 
most hit. iiioM-.lv urlitlnul 
movie you will «>v«<r h.ne 
seen I Is Dt'iinv K Ills l>es( 
Intern u (tonal NrwaundKi I- 
Reel t :..miil> - KeU l.ir Trlees 



"BROWN OK II \K\ \KI>" 
wldi Jack I'l. kf 01. 1 M.hv 
llii. in, M.erv \lilen. Km in In 
X. Itiishm.in. Jr. in.l \\ ill 
liillih II. lines .isTom llrou n 
lis the i<i. mi is 1 nlnry of Col 
If lie life vou or miyonr elne 
IWMW, Vonlh. love, *•!«•. 
Spur I Huh (. ft ll.irolil I loytl 



•I III Kl NAWAY KX- 

PRKK8." \ tin III inn meln- 
ili.mi.i of the shining mils. 
A I. ill- of heat Is .110I hrealh- 
(aklnit aiilon Areul (hril- 
ler dial 'II make you ilrlp 
your Heal. Keulurliiii .lark 
llaiiitherl v ami lll.un li,< Mr 
liatfev International News 
ami 11 (wo reel C.oiiieily 



A Large Assortment 

OK 

Birthday and Christmas Cards 

AT 

MRS. SIIUMWAY'S 

84 I'leimiint St. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleassnt Street 

is open[for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south of c.impus. 
Telephone 511 



Special on 

Shoe Repair 

Soles and Heels $1.50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 


M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 


Dictionaries 


Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 


M. A. C. Stationery 


Rings, Vanity Cases 


Fountain Pens 


Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 



"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

N( wsdealer and Stationer 



The THREE BEST SELLERS... 

Hand Tailored blue twill suits at $40 - Hand Tailored Tuxedos $40 



The largest line of overcoats in town $25 to $60 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



— JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

7h* 1 &s*aJbL Storm 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Salted Nuts Lunch Candies 

- HOT WAFFLES and MAPLE SYRUP - 

CI CARS SODAS CIGARETTES 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



ON TO MEDFORD. .. 

Do your shopping early for this game. Everything new in Overcoats, Suits, Mufflers, Gloves and Shoes. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HYANNIS 



AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10, 1926 









ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 

(Continued from Pufte I) 

first prize and Raymond G. Griffin '-7 

and Wellington \V .Kennedy "2H second 
and third rcs|>ci lively, while in the 
latter the three prizes were awarded to 
Charles K. Pitt, Kdwin K. Young and 
Arthur M. King all members of the Two 
Year course. The judges for the various 
coni|Ktitions wen Mr. A. B. Butler, a 
retail florist from Northampton, Miss 
Edna I- Skinner, Pteasator of Home 

bionomics, and Dr. Orton I., (lark, 
Assistant I'rofessor of Botany. All the 
flowers displayed in the show were 

grown in the Coilegc g reenh o u s e s, which 
were open htr inspection during tht 

entire show. 



NOTEBOOKS, PAPER, 
prices. BANNERS, 



STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



M.A.C. OUTING CLUB 

(Continued from I'.mt- I) 

o ffi ce * ! of the Club and four member* <>l 

the faculty, appointed by the Dean. The 
present (acuity members are Prolcssors 
Charles P. Alexander, Laurence K. 
Grote, Curry S. Hicks, and Charles II. 
Thompson. 



Work on the cabin began leal Saturday 

and will Ik' continued every Saturday as 
t.n ai possible. The cabin, which will !«• 
12x20 feet, is located in the Paddy 

I arms region of Mt. Toby on College 

property. This site is the most accessible 
location i>ossib!e. Many interesting ac- 
tivities are contemplated during the 
coming season. Any member of the 

student body of the College is eligible 
loi membership in the Club. The next 
meeting will be announced shortly. 



Condi Welch of the Hobart football 
nam feeds his athletes sauerkraut and 
sauerkraut juices to keep them fit and in 
condition. The excellent condition of the 
team throughout a long, hard season 
Coach Welch attributes to the judicious 
use of this diet. 



Cyrus II. K. Curtis, the wealthy 
Philadelphia publisher, recently made 
bowdoin College a gift of a new organ 
and swimming pool. 




You will find an eicelbtnt 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at 11) Amlty-St., - Opp. New Theatr* 

W* understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed, aa. 
VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



Freshmen at Cornell s|H-nt the after- 
noon before homecoming clay defining 
and |M)lishing the streets which lead to 
tin campu*. The work was done under 
the- tuperviaion of the sophomores. 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC-Northampton 

4 DAYS ONLY— Beginning Wed. Eve.-Sat. Mat. 2:15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 

—IN— 

"THE GREEN BEETLE" 

A MYSTERY CX)MEDY DRAMA 

By John Willard, Author of "The Cat and The Canary." 

PRICE S: - 50c. 85c. $1.10, AH including Tax 

TUESDAY EVENING ONLY, NOVEMBER 16 
TIIK SMASHING MUSICAL COMKDY HIT 



The editor of the "Columbia Univer- 
sity Spectator," having a suspicion that 
lew students were reading his editorial 
page, published recently a column of 
nanus taken from the New York tele- 
phone directory in place of the usual 
editorial. The edition doubted, he said, 
if any of his readers would know the 
difference. 



Shoes and Hosiery 

For Every College 
Event 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mm, 

Our Laundry First Clam 

Our Policy Giarantettl 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite I .at Office 



Say "JOHN FOTOS" when /ou are 
in NEED of a pair of nice OX/ORDS. 
Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



• * 



TIP TOES 



• • 



With a Superlative Cast of Singing and Dancing Comedians 

CLEVER DANCING CHORUS 

PRICES: 75c. $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 MAIL ORDERS NOW 

SEAT SALE OPENS SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 13. 



V> 



^ 



\ 






A>- 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 



SMOKES OF ALL K INDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

Z^ the place for the college man' 



.»♦ 



n.: 



^ss^ 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 




EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



The stag at 



THIS fellow missed out on a heavy date tonight 
by the close margin of one phone-call. But 
don't waste pity on him. He has his jimmy- 
pipe and a tidy red tin of Prince Albert . . • 
grand little pals in time of stress. 

When that cool, comforting smoke comes 
curling up the pipe-stem, troubles evanesce with 
every puff. For P. A. is The National Joy 
Smoke in fact as well as phrase. Cool as a 
money-lender. Sweet as a check from home. 
Fragrant as a pine-grove on a damp morning. 

You'll like Prince Albert better than any 
other tobacco you ever packed into a pipe. 
You'll like the friendly way it treats your tongue 
and throat. You'll like the way it helps you over 
the rough spots! Buy a tidy red tin today and see! 

Fringe albert 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A- tt to! J everywhere fm 
tidy red tine, found and half' 
pound tin humidori, mnd 
pound cryitet-gUti humidort 
with tponge-moitlentr top. 
And dlwsyi with every bit 
of bite and perch removed by 
the Prince Albert proe«»$. 




© 1926, R. T. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Overcoats and Mufflers 

- - A wide selection for the cold days ahead - - 

SOUTH WICK BROS. & GAUU 



AGAIN 

—we huve — 

Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



®frp iWaiiMrlmHgttB ffloUrmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 1926 



Classes Divide Honors 

In Razoo Night Contests 

Frosh, After Losing Bouts, Win Unexpected Victory in 

Nightshirt Parade 



Razoo Night ami the Nightshirt Parade, 
which are among the most interesting ol 
fn shman-sophomore tontlBtl. took place 
last Wednesday evening, anil when the 
sinoke of the conflict had cleared away it 
m found that honors were all even be- 
tween the contending classes; for while 
the sophomores won five out of seven ot 
the boxing and wrestling bouts, the 

iirshmen won an unprecedented victor) 

in the Nightshirt Parade by a note <>' 
03 77. 

li. cnuM of the extremely cold weather 
the bouts were held in the Drill Hall 
where a large crowd gathered to wit in us 
the proceedings. The outlook at SiBf 
sppeaiud favorable for the freshmen, for 
in the first boxing bout Horwett '30 won 
the decision over ReM '-'it in a rather un- 
interesting exhibition. In the wrestling 
Unit which followed, however, the sopho- 
mores had their turn to cheer, for Adams 
mi. Deeded in throwing Ciandominico after 
onlv a few seconds of struggle. Clements 
n! the sophomores and Warren of the 
Irosh then put on the best and chwaal 
boxing match of the evening, the former 
winning the decision by a narrow margin. 
In the next bout Yartanian made it three 
btraight for the sophomores by throwing 
liw opponent, Bond, after a short cont en t . 
Nunc good boxing was shown by Kay 'li!) 
and Hall "60 in the next bout, but the 
letter weakened in the last round. The 
last of the wrestling matches proved also 
to be the best, for Brackley '29 and 
Bartsch '30 wrestled on even terms for 
a considerable time before the former 
succeeded in pinning the shoulders of his 
O pp o nent to the mat. The last bout of 
the evening provided a surprise, for Ellert 
of the freshmen, after allowing Blaisdell 
to hit him apparently at will, suddenly 
(Continued on Pane 2) 
BE AT TUFTS 

Prom Commitee 

Chosen by Juniors 

Three Members of Soph -Senior Hop 
Committee Win Places. 



At the junior class meeting last Thurs- 
day the final elections for the Junior Prom 
Committee were held. The following men 
will serve this year: Alexander C. Hodson 
of Reading, John A. Kimball of Littleton, 
lack Amatt of Northampton, Horace T. 
Brockway, Jr. of South Hadley, and 
Albert C. Cook of Waverley. This com- 
bination should prove very efficient in 
t bat three of the members, Hodson, Kim- 
lull, and Amatt, served on the Soph- 
S'uior Hop Committee last Commence- 
ment. Hodson, in addition to serving on 
these two committees, is also a member 
of the Informal Committee. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Vn to Tufts, be at Tufts and beat Tufts." 



Thursday— 
3.46 Assembly: Mr. Waitstill Sharp, 
Sec. of the Dept. of Religious 
Education of the American Uni- 
tarian Association. 
•>.45 Parade starts from Q.T.V. 
7 Mass Meeting, Stockbridge Hall. 
Floriculture Club Card Party and 
Dance, French Hall. 
Friday — 
Two- Year Football: Deerfield Acad- 
emy, there. 
1 acuity Dance. 
Saturday — 
2.00 Varsity Football: Tufts, there. 
World Aggie Night. 
Sunday — 
"1<> Chapel: Dr. William I. Cham- 
beriain, Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions, New York City. 
Monday — 
'' " 'iitry and Egg Show. Stockbridge 

II. ill. Room 812. 
'u<sday — 

Poultry and Egg Show. 
^I'dtiesday — 

' Thanksgiving recesa begins. 



JUNIORS ELECT 

CLASS CHARACTERS 



Dr. Torrey Again Chosen Most 
Popular Prof. Only Two Men Get 
More Than One Position. 



MASS MEETING 

Mass Meeting in StockhridgU 
Hall Thursday Night! Parade 
starts from the Q.T.V. House at 
6. IS. Tufts game coming Satur- 
day. Send the team off light! 



Ind 



ex 



Competitors 
Under New System 



At the final elections of the junior class 

c h a ract er! for the 1998 Index, Professes 

Ray F. Torrey was chosen M the most 
popular professor on campus, lie also 
held this position with the present senior 
class in their Inilrx last \eai. Leonard I.. 
Thompson and Daniel J. Mulhern were 
the only members of tin- class to be 
elected to more than one position. Harold 
F. (lark won the most sought-for honor 
in being chosen as the ineml>er of the 
class who is most likely to succeed The- 
complete list of the class character! is .is 

follows; 

( Ileal Actor Robert 1.. Fox 

Class Athlete Albert C. Cook 

(lass Bluffer Daniel J. Mulhern 

( lass Cigarette Fiend 

Karl (.. Laubenstein 



Class Grind. . . . 
( lass Dancer. . . 
( lass I usser . . . 
Most ( >arrulous. 



Hart well F. Roper 
. . John A. Kimball 
Arnold 1. Redgrave 

Daniel J. Mulhern 



Most Likely to Succeed. Harold F. (lark 

Most Popular Co-ed . Dorothy L. Leonard 
Most Popular Man . Alexander C. Hodson 
Most Popular Prof.. . Dr. Ray E. Torrey 

(lass Musician William H. Draper 

Best Natured Leonard L. Thompson 

( l.iss Orator Maxwell H. Ooldbcrg 

Class Politician Howard Thomas 

Class Rustic Walter If. Howland 

( lass Soldier Donald R. Lane 

Class Wit Albert J. LaPi isc 

Woman-hater Leonard L. Thompson 

BE AT TUFTS 

STRICT ENFORCEMENT 
OF RUSHING RULES 



Will Do None of Work on Current 
Issue. Good Number Try for 

Positions. 



The .sophomore class has responded 
quite Satisfactorily to the call for com 

peritors lor the IflQfl Index Hoard. At 
present tlu> coni|>etition is only lor the 
Literary, Statistics, Art, and Photo 
graphic departments, the Business com- 
petition not beginning until later in the 

college >ear. 
The competition has been changed 

somewhat trom what it has been in past 

yean. Formerly the competitori did a 

portkM of the work for the- Index and 
were under the direction of the heads ol 
the various departments. This year, how 
ever, the coni|>ctitors will do pi at I it all\ 
none of the work tin the 1838 Index, all 
their write-U|>s Ix-ing of a gener.il nature, 
eicept in the Statistics eoni|>ctition. The 

competition will and January la, at which 

time t lit- present lioard will lake the 
results under consideration ami elect the 
board for the 1888 Index. 

The members of the sophomore class 
who are com|»eting are: Literary Depart- 
ment — John S. ( 'hud wick, Charles S. 
( 'leaves, Kendall F. Davis, Leonard W. 
Morrison, Carmeta F. Sargent, Ruth H. 
Parrish, ami William R. Phinney; Stat is 
tit s Department — Harold S. Atlams, Irene 
L Bart let t, 1 lorence M. Cook, Vincent 
S. Fager, Joseph J. Pozzi, and Gladys F. 
Sivcrt; Photographic Department — John 

s. Woodbury; ami Art Departaseal 
Francis D. Albert i. 

BE AT TUKTS 

FROSH CROSS-COUNTRY 

TEAM WINS FROM AMHERST 



> 



Number 8 



Aggie Team Read j c For 

Tufts Game i Dbjective 

"Little Green Team" Approaches Fin Contest Hopefully. 
Colleges are Grid Rivals of Lc..„ Standing 



Numeral Game 
Won by Sophs 

Victors Pass Up Many Opportunities 
in Winning 3 — 0. 



< )ne loneK held goal formed the sopho- 
more margin ol victory in their annual 
loollull tt.iilest with the !reshme-n held 
last Wednesday. Owing to unfavorable 
conditions of the ground on the athletic 
field the game was held on the drill field 
on a hastily constructed giidiron. In 
spite of hitter weat her ami a high wind 

which made conditions unfavorable km 

good playing, a large gathering watched 
the game from the sidelines. 

The game was haul fought throughout, 

( out liui.a mi I'.iiie 2 
BE AT TUFTS ■ 

MANY NEW FEATURES 

IN POULTRY SHOW 

Annual Event Promises to be Success- 
ful, (ionics November 22 and tt. 



. l, ' U ' 1,,,l( ' •«* CM* hang i„ llle 
<I"-h, k room of ,l„. M.A.c. , (m „ Im|| 

•quad, each with .... Inncrintloo telling of 

Ihe \ I. tours «|,i,|, ,|„. x , 
White boasts over Tufts dttCf 
while In-side the.se. four stands 

i ixl, emblematic <>f the 



Interfraternity Conference Provides 
Drastic Penalties for Infringements. 



Definite steps were taken to make the 
enforcement of rushing rules at M.A.C. 
an actuality, at the meeting of the Inter- 
fraternity Conference last Thursday night. 
Definite punishments and an organization 
to deal out these punishments had heen 
drawn up by committees and these com- 
mittees' reports were discussed and defi- 
nite action was taken. The penalties, as 
adopted by the Conference are, in sub- 
stance, as follows. There are four possible 
penalties. For slight infringements upon 
the tenets of the Conference Constitution 
and By-Laws, including the rushing rules, 
the fraternity shall be deprived of its 
vote in the Conference for a stated length 
of time. The second penalty states that 
the delinquent fraternity "shall receive 
notice . . . and this notice shall be posted 
in the college paper, saying that the 
Conference does not approve of said 
actions and shall demand of tne fraternity 
a statement and an apology." The third 
penalty gives the freshmen pledged by 
the delinquent fraternity permission to 
break their pledge. The fourth and ex- 
treme penalty provides for an executive 
(Continued on Page 2) 

BE AT TUFTS 

AGGIE SEXTET WILL 

FACE NEW OPPONENTS 



Evidence of Good Material in Fresh- 
man Class Gives Hope for Next 
Year's Varsity. 



Condi Derby's freshman cross-country 
sepjad garnered its first race from the 
Amherst frosh at Amherst last Wednes- 
day by a score of 15 to 40. Pour of the 
Aggie yearlings came in first, a reconl 
nearly as good as that established by the 
varsity harriers in their rate- with Amnerst, 
in which the entire seven M.A.C. com- 
petitors finished first anel seven abreast. 

This race, an unusual one in that the 
freshmen do not usually have a team 
because of the lack of opponents, gives 
encouragement for next fall, when five 
vacancies caused by graduation will need 
to be filled on the varsity team. The 
order in which the men finished was as 
follows: 

Tiffany (M), Jacobson (M), Herman 
(M;, and White (II) were tied for first, 
and were followed by Hunter (11), Theo- 
bold (A), Taylor (A), Cook (M), Wad- 
leigh (M), Deanc (A), Hcgeman (A), 
Armstrong (A), and Lehnes (A). 
BE AT TUFTS 

Promology Students 

ake Trip to Boston 



Ma 



Inspect Various Phases of Work in 
Different Places. 



Ihe plans for the Tenth Annual 
Pbultry and Lgg Show are rapidly beittf 
carried to completion under the Hiper- 
vision of the* various student committees 
Room 319 in Stockbridge- Hall where it 
is to be held is l>eing decorated for the 
pur|M>se by a special committee. The 
show is open to the public which will do 
well to steip in the room for the purpOM 
of getting the benefit of the educational 
exhibits, if for nothing else. 

The students in the Poultry Major 
classes are putting the show on and its 
purrxjse is primarily to teach them to 
prepare poultry products for the market 
in an attractive manner. Because' of the 
increasing numlter of visitors, however, 
which the show has brought recently, the 
department is endeavoring to secure 
larger exhibits of poultry and eggs freirn 
tin producers in Massachusetts. The 
Poultry De|«irtment is offering ribbons 
in the various classes and the State De 
partment of Agriculture is offering money 
prize's. All exhibits will l>e put on sale- 
to the students and visitors unless the 
exhibitor is opposed to such a disposal. 

The program for the show is an in- 
lllintiug one. On Monday, from one to 
ten o'clock in the afterne»on, ami on 
Tuesday, from eight to twelve o'clock in 
the morning, the show itself is in session. 
K. ('. B r a dle y , the judge of the show, 
from the Pacific Kgg Producers, New 
York City, will lecture at eight o'clock 
on Monday evening. Moving pictures 
will folle>w at &4S o'cltjck. The sale of 
fancy poultry starts at two o'clock on 
Tuesday. On Tuesday evening, the pro 
gram will be completed by a Poultry 
Lunch for the Poultry Majors anel 
Poultry Faculty. 

BE AT TUFTS 

RED CROSS DRIVE 

NOW UNDER WAY 



Effort Being Made to Set New Mark 
for Student Enrollment. 



The annual Red Cross drive at the 
College started at the fraternity meetings 
last Montlay evening and will continue- 
Last Wednesday twenty-seven students I for the remainder of the week. The Red 



Plans Under Way for Organizing 
New England Hockey Circuit. 



The M.A.C. hockey sextet will face 
several new opp one nts this year if plans 
materialize for a hocke-y circuit to be 
known as the New England Intercollegiate- 
Hockey League. This league will include 
such strong teams on its roster as boston 
College, Brown, Boston I'niv., M.I.T., 
Providence, Amherst, md possibly Spring- 
field, as well as Mass. Aggie. 

Each team will meet the other seven 
se-xtcts- at least once, and gam.- will be 

played at the Boston Arena, at Providence 
and at the new rink in the < oliseutii on 
the Exposition grounds in West Spring- 
field. 



of the Eour-Year and Two- Year classes 
in pomology and marketing left ejn a two- 
day trip to Boston in order to inspect 
certain phases of work pertaining to their 

cour s es . Wednesday morning they tn- 

•pected the three packing houses of the 
Nashoba Packing Association at Wilton, 
N. IL, and at Littleton and West .V ton, 
M,i". Frederic E. Cole, former extension 

professor in pomology at the- college is 
Continued em Page .*> 



NO ISSIE NEXT WEEK 

Bat aiis.- of the Thanksgiving 
recess nest week, then- will lw 
no issue- of the Collegian. Tin 
next i-sue will appear Dec. lit. 



Cross has been in the limelight for its 
work in the recent elisasters, which have 
occurred in Florida, Illinois, and Mary 
land. 
This year the drive is Ining directed by 

Elmer E. Barljer, Student Interchun h 
Setretary. He has appointed one ni.m 
from each fraternity house anil also one 
from the faculty, who will take charge of 

the work in their respective lections. 

A special effort is being made to raise 
ihe student enrollment above that of 
previous years ami it is hoped that it 
will exceed the 350 mark. Those who have 
been unable to tubscribe ai ><i will be 
given an opportunity to do m tomorrow 
after Assembly. Tin annual membership 
is one doll u and information concerning 
other membership! may In- k< ured from 
Mr. Barber. 



roon and 

I'.UU, 
i Id, ink 

unwritten destiny 
which .waits the warrkus who journey to 
lnft> next Saturday. 

Tbs Jumbos, ataaieJai under the sting 
" consecutive defeats sftat sa 

4I, ;;""''K".k a„ ,, r |v in ,,„. S1 , ( , 

w.ll l„,„^ L . vn . y ()(|I|it . n| 9nmn (() 

beat to triumph ovm then ancient rrvahj 
while .I.,- s,,,,,, banned Agates, with 
everything to gain, caaba depended upon 

"•■' """'^ » bring thtf ssesoo to 

■ wttng climax. The M V( (|()((| 

'I'l'iopriate-ly <lul,b„| ••,,„. | i(( | ( . ^.^ 
u ■•"»" •'« <»<• outset of the season, has now 
reached its peak; ...id with ti„- whole- 
hearted support of th,- Aggw Nature, will 

make football historv at Mcdfoid. 

Many alumni recafl with avidity the 
1 1 ion tiiumph arnica ihe "Whit* K..ts" 

of |«| secured after a particularly un- 
successful season in which four consecu- 
tive- losses preceded the encounter with 

the Jumbos. 

SinCl the series between the two rivals 

started in inm, twenty-tare* contests 
have bean played, out of which M.A.C. 
baseattrgad victorious in i,„ ,,,,,.„. j u f U 

has butU declared the winner in eleven, 
.'id three games have | H -en li.-s, s., ,, w i„ 
for Aggie this Saturday will p|. lu . t he 
opponents as even as they were Ix-fore 
the series stalled in ISH6. Since 1919, 
two victories anel on,- ii,- |,.„ baM the 
fruits of the- lal>or of Tufts, in contrast 
to ftmr Aggie triumphs. 

The comparative season's records do 
".I uululy favor either team, although 
records mean nothing when M.A.C. faces 
Tufts. The Medforditcs have won only 
three games, from Lowell Textile-, Mates, 
and Howdoin, while Vermont, H.uv.ml, 
New Hampshire, and B.l/. have been th.- 
..uses of four reversals. The Aggie 
record, elsewhere apiHiidcd in this issue, 
shows only one victory, that over Wor- 
cester let h. 

Tufts pr.se nls a formidable lineup with 
a line whi. h averages 177 pounds, ami 

outweighs the (fatal by t.n paunds to a 

man. Every M.A.C. forward, w th the 
Ix.ssiU,. exception of Howie, who may be 
op|x>setl by t.oltlman, will be outweighed 
more or less. The holiest m., n among 
the fundus backs is Ellis, the signal- 
bafffcar, who weighs I.Vl, |, u t he is heavier 
than any regular M.A.C. ballcarrier 
except Johnson and (ox. Weight alone 
cannot disc. enrage the Agates, however, 
for eased Md brains will also be essential 
in this contest, and the Agates have both. 
The probable lineup for Tufts will in- 
clude Fitzgerald, right end; Soule, right 
tatkle; Nussbaum, right guard; Brehaut, 
-enter; Brown, left guard; Hanson, left 
tackle; (kjldman e^r Bowker, left end; Ellis, 
quarterback, < aptain Schroeler, right 
halfhack; Browne, left half; and Marshall, 

(attack. 

Seven M.A.C. seniors who have been 
regulars during this season will play their 
last game for Aggie at Medford. They are: 
(aptain "Cerry" Amstein, "Andie" An- 
derson, "Lewie" Black, "Truck" Cart- 
wright, "Ed.lie" Heart!, "Red" Mahoney, 
and "Lint " Murdough. The Aggie lineup 
(Continued e»n Page 2) 



1926 RECORDS 



M.A.C. 

M.A.C. 0— Bates 2 
M.A.C. 6— Conn. Aggie l.i 
M.A.C. 0— Williams 30 
MAC. 7— W.P.I. 
M.A.C. 7— Amherst 21 
M.A.C. 0— Springfie Id '.) 
Tults 

Tufts 2<> Lowell Ted 

TttftS 10 Hahs (I 

I nits in Bowdoin 7 

Tufts 13 Vermont 1 1 

8 Harvard 69 

Infis :; New Hampshire 28 

Tufts 7 H. U. Hi 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspa|KT of the Mas*achusetts 
Agricultural College, Puplisaad evary 

Wednesday by the students 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

w.lliam L. Deu W hditor-in < hW 

■uswoaia hakna ki. -js Msaagiai WW 

1.1 I'AKTMl Nl EDITORS 
Editorial William L. Dtt* W 

Ath!. " A1 """ K - l,AkK * 

\V. GOBOOM Him IK ■ 

Campu. News »«•■" U S '-' :N < Kk * 

Faulty Jk Short COOTIM Im.wakii H. NlCBOLS 2B 
Intercollegiate Fuitor Frances C. Bruce '11 
Co-Ed New* JOWWmm I'anzica 2H 



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copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
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In case of change of address, sub- 
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roSoSS a9 A.xc"t r l for mjiltog « •***'£ 

of Dosage provided for in section 1103 Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



JOHN MASON TYLER 
We college students are very apt to 
assume that as a man grows older and 
more experienced, he becomes a poorer 
and less interesting Assembly speaker. 
Imagine our surprise and delight, there- 
fore, when we found in Dr. John M. Tyler 
one of the most fascinating and interest- 
ing speakers of the year. Not only, 
interesting was he, but we still remember 
several of the things he said. What is 
the background of this man? In an effort 
to discover something of the answer, we 
stuck our nose into "Who's Who" and we 
found an impressive array of facts. Dr. 
Tyler was born in Amherst in 1851, he 
was graduated from Amherst College in 
the class of '73, he received his M.A. 
from Amherst, and then after studying 
further at Union Theological Seminary, 
and in Germany, he returned to Amherst 
in 1879. He was Stone Professor of 
Biology from 1883 until he was retired 
in 1917. He was awarded an honorary 
Ph.D. from Colgate in 1888. He is the 
author of five books, all of which are 
well known in the scientific world— 
"Whence and Whither of Man," "Growth 
and Education", "Man in the Light of 
Evolution", "The New Stone Afja", 
"The Coming of Man". No wonder 
that WC were treated to something worth 
while when a man with such a background 
and with a j>ersonality magnetized by 
years of human understanding came 

before us! 



In case you failed to read our column 
last week, we shall reiterate our remarks 
concerning the coming athletic struggle. 
Tufts College hat long been a dark Iioim- 
in the Aggie schedule. This year, however, 
the Aggie team H going to give the dark 
horse a c oat of white paint . The ceremony 
will be much better, however, if you are 
all there to participate. Therefore, we 
repeat ON TO TUFTS!! BE AT TUFTS 
and BEAT TUFTS!! 

BE AT TL'FTS 

CLASSES DIVIDE HONORS 

'Continued from Page I) 
uncorked ■ terrific punch and to win by 
a knockout. 

The scene then shifted to the lower 
level of the athletic field, a large part of 
which was covered by aa inch of icy 
water. The sophomores here had an 
opportunity to show their authority by 
making the frosh play leapfrog the entire 
length of the field. K\ entually the classes 
formed in two circles, the sophomores 
outside, and began to run in opposite 
directions until the gun was fired for the 
start of the scrap. For the first three 
minutes the struggle was man to man, 
and pajamas and nightshirts were ripped 
right and left. After three men wen- 
allowed to get together, however, the 
battle assumed a different aspect, for the 
frosh, outnumU-ring their opponents by 
more than two to one, and resentful of 
the ignominy thrust upon them earlier in 
the evening, proceeded to carry thirty- 
seven of the sophomores into their pen, 
while the latter succeeded in getting only- 
one lone frosh into theirs. Although 
seventy-five nightshirts were removed, 
the frosh succeeded in retaining nineteen, 
thus winning by a good margin. 
BE AT TUFTS 



PERSONALS 



COMMUNICATIONS 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

In spite of the fact that the scii-iuist 
has misinterpreted the spirit in which 

we commented on Harry Houdini, we 

realize that he has something to say to 
all those of us who would consider fairly 
every point of View. We realized at the 
time ol the writing of the editorial in 
question that we were •tapping into a 
bed of live coals, or. at least, a bed of 
coals which would be fanned into a 
bright glow with very little effort. There- 
fore, we include- Dr. Crampton's com- 
munication in our columns with a teeling 
of satisfaction and pleasure, borne of a 
desire to make the Collegian as repre- 
sentative as we may. 



STRICT ENFORCEMENT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
reprimand from the President of the 
College to the fraternity and its national 
officers, or in the case of a local fraternity, 
to the fraternity and its faculty alumni 
memtiers and its other prominent alumni. 
All violations shall be brought to trial 
before the "Trial Board". The Trial 
Board has the chairman of the Student 
Life Committee as its president and it 
works on a plan similar to that of the 
Honor Council. The following is a state- 
ment from the preamble of the Constitu- 
tion of this board. "This organization 
has been established in order to have a 
definite body of men on the campus to 
which all interf rater nity complaints may 
be made. The purpose of the Trial Board 
is to act on all such complaints judicious- 
ly, so that the rushing rules will be 
effective on the M.A.C. campus. It is 
hoped that any fraternity or fraternities 
who have complaints in the nature of 
violation of the Constitution or By-Laws 
of the Conference will submit their com- 
plaints to the Trial Board for its con- 
sideration. The Trial Board will be in- 
effective if such complaints are not sub- 
mitted to it." 

The personnel of the Board shall be 
the senior members ol the Interfraternity 
Conference, except during a trial, when 
the member! of the accused and accusing 
Paternities shall be excluded. In every 
case-, the president of the accused frater- 
nity shall be the official representative of 
that fraternity. 

BE AT TUFTS 



Dr. (.lick and "Red" Morrison have 
liken up mental telepathy. They com- 
pletely battled the Holyokc Kotarians 
last week. 

"Ken" Bartlett has decided to train 
for the Sunday night rush at the Inn. 

".\| " I ook is another man in the lt=t 
ol those- who hate to leave the infirmary. 

We- are glad to see that Dan Mulhern 
has at ast been rewarded. The ceremony 
took place at the election of class charac- 
ters. 

P 

Ken Berry, Ld Young and Robby Nash 
>p« -lit the week-end at the Wheaton Hop. 

Mills, McKittrick, Carlson, Drai>er 
and Cifford spent Saturday night on Mt. 
Toby with almost no blankets. This 
sounds like a bet, but it isn't. 

The Agates were well represented 
among the flora around Pratt Field 
Saturday afternoon. 

P 

We have so many further nominations 
for the rah-rah boys' club that we have 
decided to omit further publication for 
fear of treading on their toes. 

We saw the Business Manager looping 
down from the north Sunday evening, 
so we concluded that Almeda had arrived 
safely back from her sojourn in Washing- 
ton. 

P 

Necessity is the mother of invention. 
Sig. Ep. parks its pajamas on the electric 
light wire. 



Tin- < Ol. I H. I w ill at all times (fed to Publish 

■ny communications which may in- ten) to h. but 
the Editors will issume no responsibility for the 
views expressed, and do not McesssrOy endorse 

MM h view t. 



Harvard and Princeton have engaged 
in a Tea Cup War according to the New 

Student. It is interesting to note, es- 
pecially to us editors, that the first 
tangible cause ol the war was an editorial 
which appeared in the Harvard Lampoon. 
Princeton and Vale are both credited or 
discredited with some part in the severing 
of football relations. This sepiabble only 
adds another instance toward the proof 
of Dean Swift's statement that the most 
severe wars are fought because of a differ- 
ence of opinion, especially whea it is i 
matter of indifference. 

* * * 

One of Amherst's most prominent 
figures has retired from the limelight, 
President Olds. President Olds' resig- 
nation, of course, will mean more to the 
college at the southern end of the town, 
but it must effect both ends of Amherst 
and all the way in between, for Dr. Olds 
has long been a resident of this town. He 
has been on the Amherst faculty since 
1891, according to the report in the 
Amherst Student. He was made Dean in 
1910, and he took ove-r the presidency in 
June, 1923, at a time when Amherst 
College was well shaken up by dissention. 



NUMERAL GAME WON BY SOPHS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
neither side being able to gain any de- 
cided advantage, though the sophomores 
had a slight edge on their Opponents to 
judge by the fact that they narrowly 
missed making a larger score. The 
neophytes' light but flashy backtield was 
able to make but little impression on the 
sophomore defense, though one of t he- 
exciting moments of the game was a long, 
broken field run bv Knee-land in the third 
period for a 20-yard gain. On the other 
hand the sophomore backs, Coukos and 
Nitkicwiez, one bucking the line and the 
other carrying the ball on off-tackle plays 
were unable to gain consistantly during 
the greater part of the game. 

The sophomores lost their first chance 
to score in the second period when Marx 
missed a try for a field goal from the 30- 
yard line. In the third period however 
a blocked kick gave the sophomore eleven 
the ball on their opponents 20-yard line. 
On the fourth down Marx dropped back 
to the 30-ard line and, in spite of the 
wind and the poor target offered by the 
improvised goal posts, lifted a pretty 
placement kick over the crossbar for the 
only score of the game. In the fourth 
period the sophomores, starting from the 
frosh 40-yard line, made three consecu- 
tive first downs to place the balloon on 
the 5-yard stripe. Here the freshman 
line held desperately and the fourth down 



"Dutch" Ansell should start a lunch 
cart business. There are several co-eds 
who like midnight lunches. 

Tom Kane had his picture taken, lead- 
ing the class discussion in Ag. Ed. 51. 

Dick Davis thinks Don Lane a good 
room-mate. Dick returned Sunday after- 
noon to Amherst to study and found the 
room securely locked and barred and no 

key. 

P 

Someone had the audacity or ignorance 
to ask for Eddie Haertl in Amherst last 
Saturday night. 

P 

We have always wondered whether Jim 
Cunningham is aping Johnny O.'s s's or 

vice versa. 

P 

It is an amusing psychological survey, 
noting the various ruses of college nun to 
appear interested in certain gut courses. 

P 

Wilder Hall entertained a geranium 
cat iwood-pussv) last Friday. 

P 

North College held a private- mass 
meeting Sunday evening. When the fire 
engine arrived the meeting had adjourned. 

P 

The Personals Editor is still looking for 
some of those promised personals. If 
you are not represented here it is your 
own fault or that of your "brothers". If 
you are misrepresented, remember there 
is always another column coming. 

The football team is going to Tufts and 
the famous band, also. Are you going, 
too? 



found the ball a scant four inches from 
the goal line. The frosh were unable to 
move the ball far from their threatened 
end zone in four downs and the ball was 
in the possession of the sophomores about 
five yards from the goal line when the 
game ended. The summary: 



'29 

Clements, Richarelson, le 

Marx, It 
Sullivan, lg 

Poultensen, Brackley, c 
Rudquist, rg 
Walkden, rt 
Plummer, Baily, re 
Richards, qb 
Nitkiewicz, lhb 
Howe, Crowley, rhb 
Coukos, fb 

Referee: Salman. Umpire: Ball. Head 
linesman: Gavin. 

. BE AT TUFTS 

Work on the lnkhorne is in progress 
and the boy's group is meeting every 
Wednesday evening at the home of 
Professor Grose and the girls are meeting 
every Tuesday evening at Professor 
Rand's home. 



'30 

re, Burbank 

rt, Warren 

rg, Telson 

C, Morawski 

lg, Crane 

It, Drew 

le, Baboon 

qb, Kneeland 

rhb, Bond 

lhb, Ellert 

fb, Giandomenico 



Nov. 8, 192C. 

To the Editor 

of the Collegian 
Dear Sir: 

Readers of the Collegian are very apt 
to regard its editorials as more or less 
"official" expressions of the opinions 
prevalent among the students at M.A.C. 
It is greatly to be hoped, however, that 
those who read the editorial entitled 
"Harry Houdini", published in the 
Collegian of Nov. 3, will not think that 
the misconceptions given publicity there- 
typify the opinions current among our 
students. 

In the first paragraph of the editorial 
in question, we are informed that "Harry 
Houdini has for several years lieen in the 
limelight . . . largely because of his baf- 
fling (sic) exiiosures of the spirit mediums' 
art." Houdini's fame, however, was 
established long before he began to ex- 
pose the quackery of spiritist "mediums", 
and most of us regard his exposures of 
inediumistic hocus-pocus as illuminating, 
rather than "baffling"— but I will not 
quarrel with the writer of the editorial 
over such minor details. I would object 
most strenuously, however, to the impli- 
cations contained in the statements that 

"Most scientists agree that his 

[Houdini's] methods (in exposing the 
hocus-pocus of fake mediums.] have not 
been strictly scientific. For this reason 
his death is especially significant (?), for 
he left a branch of research, to which he 
has contributed much, very incomplete." 
One wonders where the writer of the 
editorial obtained the authority to speak 
so glibly in the name of "most scientists", 
and it would be extremely interesting to 
have from him a list of the names of the 
persons comprising this majority of 
scientists who condemn Houdini's "de- 
bunking" methods as "unscientific", while 
(by implication) they support the claims 
of the mediumistic frauds. Everyone 
knows that huge sums have been, and 
still are, offered by scientific bodies here 
and abroad, to anyone who can clearly 
demonstrate his or her spiritist powers 
under conditions precluding fraud; and 
not one penny of this sum has ever been 
won by any of the numerous mediums 
who have exhausted their bags of trie ks 
in vain efforts to purloin the prizes by 
hook or crook! If "most scientists" con- 
demn as "unscientific" the attitude of 
Houdini and others who have prevented 
the handing over of these prizes to the 
mediums who have supposedly won them, 
why is it that "most scientists" do not 
exert their "majority-right" and compel 
the delivery of these prizes to their 
"rightful" owners, instead of seemingly 
consenting to an injustice by remaining 
silent? About nine out of every ten of 
the scientists one meets at our annual 
meetings of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science looks as- 
kance at the spiritist vagaries of Sir 
Oliver Lodge and the other dupes of 
mediumistic hocus-pocus; and instead of 
applying the designation "unscientific" to 
Houdini's methods, "most scientists" 
apparently heartily app ove of them, 
while they pass over as not worthy of 
one's serious consideration the sorry 
"evidence" for spiritist phenomena pre- 
sented by Sir Oliver Lodge and other 
di voices of the ghost cult. 

With regard to the implication that 
Houdini's investigations were "incom- 
plete" because he could find no shred of 
evid nee for the existence of spooks, 
hobgoblins and the like, one can but 
remark that under these limitations the 
investigations of all who examine supposed 
spirit ist phenomena will of necessity re- 
main "incomplete" till the end of time, 
for the very good reason that such phan- 
t ms exist only in the minds of our con- 
temporaneous cave-men who, despite 
their modern habiliments, still cherish 
the ancient animism and ghost worship 
of their savage forebears. 

As a culminating piece of folly, the 
writer of this amazing editorial gravely 
refers to the recent alleged communica- 
tion from Mars (supposedly sent by 
"mental telepathy" to an English astrolo- 
ger) and closes with the cryptic remark 
that "There may be something in it." 
Of course there are a few objections, such 
as Mars is a dead planet, and "mental 
telepathy" is a dead issue, and Martian- 
ese (or whatever language the non-exis- 
tent Martians speak) is a dead language 
incomprehensible to English astrologers 
who might receive a message in that 



AGGIE TEAM READY FOR 

(Continued from Page 1 

is highly uncertain because of the large 
number of capable substitutes available , 
but the regular roster of Bowie, right end, 
Ani-teiii, right tackle; Cartwright, right 
guard; Mills, center; Anderson, left 
guard; Murdough, left tackle; McKit- 
trick, left end; Cox, tpiarterback; Johnson, 
Haertl, Mahoney, or Tufts at halfback; 
and Cook, fullback will doubtlessly sac 
service, although Black and Kelton, 
guards; Me Aiiisu-r or Mulhern, center; 
Walkden and Plant inga, tackles; Evans, 
end; and Quinn, the quarterback who 
took the safety in the Tufts game last 
year are also likely to be given chances. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17. 1926 



language, and — but Oh well, what's tin 
use! If you believe that sort of thing, 
then that is the sort of thing ycu belie\. 
and that's all there is to it — and what 
are objections among spiritist friemk 
anyway? Very truly yours, 

G. C. Crampton. 

BE* AT TUFTS 

To the Editor: 

What fools we mortals be! Two yean 
ago the Senate felt out student opinion, 
decided that a large number would like 
to liven up the excitement at the football 
game in Medford by having the band 
present, and gave the opportunity for 
contributions by the s udent body. The 
band went to Tufts and all seemed to 
think the idea good. Again we are to 
play Tufts in Medford. Behold! We are 
taxed to send the band down. Nor is 
this the first time that such has happened. 
Everything has been subsidized. One 
must even pay a certain sum for class 
dues to the Treasurer of the College, under 
compulsion, before he may enroll as a 
student of the institution. Is this a college 
or a grammar school? Are we men with 
men's pride or are we a lot of whipped 
curs? This protest is written to let the 
public know that some of us object to 
the general savor of compulsion around 
campus. R. W. H. 



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WIN RECOGNITION 

"Three Basketeers" of Last Year's 
learn Named on All-New kngland 
Quintets. 



The "Three Basketeers" en the- 1986 
basketball team if M.A.C. rec ei ved aa 
■ward lor tluir efforts la the recently 
issued "Basketball Guide," published by 
Spalding. "Johnuy" Temple, "Larry" 
Jones anel "Ray" Smile) .ill received 
nominations for the- mythical All-Nea 
England quintet, u * I »< I "Merry" Parten- 

he-inii-r, captaiii-i-li-ct lor the- Approaching 

■tinarwi 

Captain Temple, high scorer for twe> 
successive saaaoas was named ■ forward 

em the- first te-ani, an honor which lie- also 
recei v ed last year. JOBS* anel Smile) 
received posit ions on tile- SrCOnd train, 
the former at cenU-r anel the- latter at 
Kiiarel, — their regular |>ositions. This trio 
who graduated last June, took part in 42 
basketball games, 34 of which were 
victories. 

Captain-elect I'artenheimer who was 
surpassed in scoring by Temple alone-, 
was chosen as guard on the third team. 
He has participated in 21 wins on the 
court while- 5 e>f the games in which he 
has pailii ipate<l have- l>ecn losses. 

C andid a t ea for the 1927 quintet are 
holding practice sessions twice a week 
under the tutelage of "Red" Ball 51, 
Two- Year mentor, and "Ray" Smiley "SO 
who is taking graduate work on tin- 
cam pus. In addition te> I'artenheimer tin- 
outstanding petfonaen who have re- 
|x>rted for the tryouts include "Ray" 
e.rifrin '27 and "Blonelie" Theunas '1>8, 
twe> letter-men frejm last year's e hampiem- 

ship quintet. < iriftin is likely te» appear 

at guarel once mem-, while Thennas i> 
playing at canter for the present. "Roly" 
Re-eel, "Sepiash" Mel.wen and "Mac" 
Mc<iuire-, three juniors, are making 
strong bids for forward Iwrths. Several 
BBSSnban from last year's freshmen squad 
have also appeared, including Re>be-rtson, 
Tennpkins, anel Webber. 

Coach (.ore is still oteupieel with foot- 
liall anel members of the eleven who 
inte-nel to go out for basketball will not 
be- required to rc|>e>rt for an interval after 
the final Iik.iIi.iII name- at Tufts. 
BE AT TL'FTS 

The divisioa of Agriculture held its 
annual Hoimel-up ,ii StOckbridfC Hal! on 
Saturday evening, Nov. 18. About sixty 

or s event y OOUpIei were- present and the- 

- venia g was na enjoyable one- te» all. 



POMOLOGY sudin is 
Osutmnei haai Nis II 
now superintendent « » t tin- Association. 

rhursday morning the- group witnessed 
the early morning activities ol the V>r!h 

anel laiuie-il Hall markets at Boston anel 
then we ut to the- Chai leslow ii Am I inn 

Market, which is on«- e>i the largest 
potatoe wholesale districts in the- world, 
The party Inspected several wholesale 
ho u s e s anel i in- produce exchange* and 

then went eleiwn to the- eleu ks where the 

Devonian vva-. being loaded with apples 
for Europe. The party hail lune h aboard 

the- ship as the- «lie-s|> nl Mr. We-bbling ol 

the firm, Simonds, Scuttleworth ami 
Webbling. In the afternoon the) inspec- 
ted the- Qttincy market storage plant anil 
re tur ned to Amherst Thursday night. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
ONE FOURTH OFF 

This lulveriUement will be atirpled an J 
part lash prln- »n any <.<>lf Haft. Tennis 
Kae-kel, or e.oif Club. I toes anyone rt-ml our 
advertising? 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 




Good taste and good health 
demand sound teeth and 
sweet breath. 

The use of Wrigley's chew* 

ing gum after every meal takes 

care of this important item of 

personal hygiene in a delight' 

ful* refreshing way — by clear* 

ing the teeth of food particles 

and by helping the digestion. 

The result is a sweet breath that 
•hows care for one's self and con- 
sideration for others — both marks 
of refinement. 

G126 



WHIG LEYS 

3 "-"idy packs 3^ 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

Jos. 

7. Ml 

One- 
Show 
at Night 



Friday 

.< 00 

6.45, 8. JO 



Saturday 

J.ss 
t.45 s.se 



Reel Special "ONI MIN- 
I H TOPI \v ||„. 11 

I IM II VSII ||„. <;KII>- 

IKO\ «.IIOST " Th« «r ■ 

t-sl football pliiyer llu- wnrlel 
lUM ever known. In ,, niii.i-.Ii- 
Inti. exillliili; iwoaplng l.tle 
of ,.iiil|,us life .1 thrill with 
the Joyous Hlriiftftlt- of the 
ittrlninmue line vilirunl 
wllli lemler emotion liuli- 
I1II11U with Kinu-il) . 

IM. Nl-WN. I'.lllll-N, Cl>ll||.<|) 

Pries* 1 

Mat. « iiii.i Me .uitiiis. ts, 

Kve. floor, . I .V balcony 40<- 



f.hiis Hiiy .mil Joan «.raw- 
fonl in -PARIS." Oayssl 
of reveU In the I .iiln quar- 
ter SrwUMI liftln sieni-s 
ever filmed In the noloriou* 
underworld haunlH .1111:1/- 
Inft h.ietles of Apache beau- 
lies for the love of a mun 
Hi ely . NiirprUlint lov e udven - 
noes of an American youlh 
In i|in-si of etcltemeni 
■Spoi illtilii and 11 two reel 
Smllh Comedy. "SMITH'S 

BABY." 



"WAR PAINT." A rip. 
rourinft wesiein feature full 
<>f 1 In ills . to lion .mil rom- 
ance, fbe kind of Western 
lli.it keeps you on the edfte 
of >our Neat all the time 
Inie111.11l011.il News Weekly 
and two reel Comedy. 



A Large Assortment 
op- 
Birthday and Christmas Cards 

AT— 

MRS. SHUMWAY'S 

S4 Plea. a nt St. 



DRURY'S BAKERYl 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

Firsi Intiisf south of campus. 

Telephone 511 



Values Extraordinary 
IN 

Leather and Suede 

Jackets 



I 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Special on 

Shoe Repair 

Soles and Heels $ 1 .50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 


M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 


Dictionaries 


Wi.tch Fobs, Paper Cutters 


M. A. C. Stationery 


Rings, Vanity Cases 


Fountain Pens 


Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 



"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx 1 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



(THANKSGIVING... 

Means looking your best when you're home for the big feed. Everything we show is of the latest style and highest quality. 
Our prices speak for themselves. We have some especially fine silk Scarfs at - $2.00 to $4.50 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



-JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

DEUEL'S ANTISEPTIC THROAT PASTEU.ES will relieve hoarseness, 
tickling and Bronchial ailments. Pleasant and Effective. 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



[$EAT tijpts 

Go down to see' that game in one of Bolter's Overcoats. Come in early for the clothes you'll need this weekend 

New shipment of Ties and Mufflers. 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



HYANNIS 



! 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17, 1926 



MILITARY NOTS1 

Plans .tic uncle i way at present to form 
I mi |d rfflc team at the College. P' <" 
tire is being held in shooting on tlu- 0111- 

af-doora rang* nvarj Tunnday and Thurs- 
day morning under tlu- |>crsoiial super 
vision of Captain Edwin M. Sumner and 

Sergeant Crook. 



NOTEBOOKS, PAPER, 
prices. BANNERS, 



STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



Polo prat tice for all the upper-clansmen 
who are interested and who are laking 
the advance course in Military, will begin 
this afternoon at 3J0 o'clock. It will be 

continued every Wednesday and Friday 

at this hour as long as the weather 
permits. 



It is of interest to note that the horse 
show which was held at Mt. Ilolyoke 
College earlier in the fall, was so MCOMfr 
fill that it has been decided to make it a 
IMMinanent thing every fall. It is hoped 
that in the future a team of co-ed ritlers 

will be farmed which will compete with a 

similar team from Ml. Ilolyoke in differ- 
ent event! at OUT ihOW in the spring and 
at Mt. Ilolyoke in the fall. 



The uniforms for the juniors who are 
taking the advance course in Military 
Science and Tactics, have finally arrived 
and were issued at the supply 10001 last 
Friday. The uniforms have been changed 
this year in order that these uniforms 
may l>e worn in active service in the 
regular army after graduation if such an 
occasion arises. In pa>t > ears it has been 
necessary for students upon graduation 
t„ purchase an entirely new uniform if 
they wished to go into active sersue. 
The uniforms are of the same color as 
last year but of a different material. 



from 8.30 a. m. to 10.30 a. m., and from 
1.00 p. in. to 4.30 p. m. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1.00 p. 
in. to 4.30 p. m. 

Saturdays from 8.30 a. in. to 12 noon. 

There are on hand ten of the latest 
model gallery rifles issued by the govern- 
ment and it is requested that all con- 
cerned avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to fire in order that a rifle team 
may be picket! by December 1. 



The indoor rifle gallery will be oi*n for 
firing for tlu- Minor, junior tad eophomore 

• lasses during the following hours: 

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday! 



a T f TV /I 4 DAYS ONLY 

Academy or Music— beginning 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. Wed. Nov. 17th 

EVENINGS at 8.15 Saturday Mat. at 2.15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 

PAUL HANSELL, Manager 

"JUST SUPPOSE" 

A ROMANTIC COMEDY by A. K. Thomas 

PRICES: 50c. 85c. $1.10, Including Ta»— Mail Or ders Filled. 

NEXT^WEEK-Beginning Wed., Nov. 24, The Northamp- 
ton Repertory Company in "CAPTAIN APPLEJACK."_ 

TK OVINC PICTURE S 

Sun., Mon., Tues.. Nov. 21. 22, 23— Mats., Em. 
Rudolph Valentino in - "THE SON OF THE SHEIK. 



The following matches have boefl 
scheduled for the K.O.T.C. rifle- team 
during the coming winter: W.P.I., Univ. 
of Cincinnati, Rhode Island State, Culver 
Military Academy, Univ. of Nebraska, 
Univ. of Dayton, Oklahoma A. and M., 
antl Pennsylvania State. The team has 
also been entered in the National Rifle 
AMOdation Intercollegiate Shoot. 



DRESS PUMPS 

—AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



You will find an exceltant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the mint up-to-date Goodye w 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at II) Amlty-St.. - Opp. New That*) 

We understand your requirements and are f, t . 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed. ttk 
VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 



275 High St., Holyoke 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, M U i 

Our Laundry Flret Claw 

Our Pellcy Guaranty 

REPAIRING AND ALL RINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 

PRICES. 

Opposite Pom i itti,,. 



44 SNOW STORMS!! 

According to the predictions of the Matron*. 

mers we are tohaWTQ >!■— ISIWS tMswtaUi 
Kememher. we are well supplied with 
RUBBER FOOTWSAE.auchMOTorohoo] 
Rubbers. Rubber Boots, etc. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to fco and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 



• c, 



SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 




WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



c ^p other cigarette ever had 
so many millions of friends 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



WHEREVER you travel, by sea or 
by land, in places of work or 
palaces of pleasure, you find the 
(Friends of Camel. And since the 
art of increasing life's comfort 
through smoking was discovered, 
no other cigarette ever made and 
kept so many friends. 

Why does Camel lead the world? 
Because only the choicest Turkish 
and Domestic tobaccos are bought 
for Camels. Because Camel is given 
a blending that, regardless of price, 



can be found in no other cigarette. 
Because the world's largest to- 
bacco organization spares neither 
cost nor effort to make Camel the 
utmost in cigarettes. 

Camel rewards its friends with 
never-ending peace and satisfac- 
tion. Through the day and into 
the night, it's simply impossible to 
smoke enough Camels to tire the 
taste. We invite you to answer, 
now, the world's most popular 
smoke invitation — Have a Camel! 



R. J. RBYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 



© 1926 



Overcoats and Mufflers 



A wide selection for the cold days ahead - - 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY- 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



(Sfo iWaBflarfriwttis (HollgQtatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, DEC. 2, 1926 



Number 9 



Many Additions to 

Glee Club's Personnel 

Final Selections Made. Parsons to Head Men's Glee Club 



The personnel of the various units of 
tin Musical Clubs have finally been 
decided upon as a result of the trials 
which have been held throughout the 
term. The Men's Glee Club is headed 
this year by Clarence H. Parsons '27 of 
North Amherst. The members are as 
follows: First tenors — Ernest G. McVey 
'■11, Lyman W. Graves '29, Stillman H. 
l'arks '30 and Don C. Tiffany '30; Second 
tenors — Donald H. Campbell '27, Charles 
F. Clagg '27, Hans Baumgartner '28, 
Karl G. Laubenstein '28, Robert H. 
0«er« '28, Emory D. Burgess '29, 
Laurence A. Carruth '29, William A. 
Day '2 >, Frank I. Howe '29, Lucien W. 
Dean '30, William E. Grant '30, Lauri 
Roaka '30, and Moody L. Shepherd '30; 
First bashes — Max Bovarnick '27, Louis 
N. Goldberg '27, James H. Cunningham 

s Francis D. Albrti '29, Charles S. 
Cleaves '29, Martin G. Fonseca '29, Evan 
I Richardson '29, Robert G. Cunning- 
ham '30, Herbert A. Goodell '30, Hermon 
U. Goodell '30, Russell K. Nims '30, 
Francis C. Pray '30, Wallace S. Phinmy 
'30, Eric Singleton "JO, and Spencer C. 
Stanford '30; Second basses — Otto H. 
Kiehter '27, Edwin E. Marsh '28, George 
H. Flint '29, Lewell S. Walker '_".), 
Clarence E. Hammond '.'<(), Kermit K. 
Kingsbury '80, and Laurence W. Spo oner 

i The Musical Clubs Orchestra will 
be directed by Leslie R. Smith Jr. '28, and 
the (iirls' Glee Club by Miriam H. 1 i n — . 
The new members of the (iirls' 
Glee Club are as follows: l".> — Edith 
Bertenafcsw, Alice Johnson, Elizabeth 
Lynch, Gladys Si vert. Doris Whittle. 
'30 — Stina Berggren, Monica Cotter, 
Margaret Donovan. Lucy Grunwaldt, 
Elate Haubcnreiser, Kathryn Knight, 

Gertrude Maylott, Ida PoUin, Margaret 

Swett, Elizabeth Woodin. 



New Art Exhibition 

In Memorial Hall 



Collection of Etchings and Wood 
Block Prints Shows Work of Famous 

Artists. 



Each exhibition which is hung in the 
Memorial building by Prof. Frank A. 
Waugh has a particular charm or interest 
and the exhibition which has recently 
been on display was no exception. This 
exhibition was of a rather different type 
! han any that has been shown recently, 
■ that it was composed of etchings and 
wood block prints. This collection was 
secured from the American Federation of 
iid included some of the bes' ex- 
amples of such famous American artists 
« Frank W. Benson, Alfred Hutty, and 
Cfcariea H. Woodbury. The wood block 
pnati were especially striking with their 
brilliant colors and lively subjects. This 
type of work is interesting because wood 
"Oek prints are in vogue just at present. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



irong. We are not here to play, 
I" dream, to drift, 
H t have hard work to do, and loads 
to lift." 



Thursday— 

• ; U> p. in. Assembly. Student Forum. 

'•15 [>. m. Illustrated lecture by 
Prof, Waugh in FYench Hall. 
Friday— 

' -00 p. m. Social Union Entertain- 
it. "The Cotter's Saturday 
Night." 
Saturday— 

lllty partv. Memorial building. 
Sunday— 

l- m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
' )r - Nehemiah Boynton, Pastor 
1 meritus of Clinton Ave. Chapel, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



ANNUAL POULTRY SHOW 
ATTRACTS INTEREST 



Exhibits and Attendance Compares 
Favorably With Other Years. Prof. 
Monahan Gives Demonstration. 



On account of the 
Thanksgiving Holiday, 
the Collegian will 
come out Thursday 
instead ot Wednesday. 



Several Grid Stars 

Graduate This Year 



Ten Seniors on 1926 Squad Will Be 
Unavailable Next Year. 



That a chicken can b ■ easily and neatly 
picked in two minutes was demonstrated 
Monday night, Nov. 22, at the tenth 
annual market poultry and egg show held 
at Stockbridg • Hall under the auspices of 
the student poultry classes. 

< ieorge W. Hall, Two- Year, of Dudley, 
was the best student picker of the con- 
test with a picking time of six minutes and 
seven seconds. Robert C. Ami's '27 of 
Falmouth was second and Ira R. Wile, 
Two-Year, of New York City, third. 
William C. Monahan, Extension Proles 
sor of P o ultry Husbandry, made the time 
of two minutes in a special demonstration. 

More than 100 dressed birds were 
entered in the exhibition class, the 
majority being sold at auction after the 
show. According to Marion C. Pulley, 
instructor in Poultry Husbandry, and 
Herniary and general manager of tin 
show, the number of birds exhibited and 

the att en dance at the show compared 

very favorably with other years. 

The first prize in the egg grading con- 

teet to: poultry itnrlanta went to C. D. 
Dewarof Dedham. Second place went to 

J. S. Rogers of Orleans and third to 
Don ild Woodbury of Sunderland. In the 
brown egg display classes the winners for 
two-year students were Donald Wood- 
bury, Frederick O. Sime of North Wey- 
mouth, James H. Bird of West Roxbury 

and Alfred H. Parker of Bam Pnpper e fl. 

In the vocational group winners were I.. 
\Y. (.rant of Fall River, C. F). Dewar, 
J. S. Rogers and A. \Y. Tie-fry of Lynn. 

Angelo A. Martini '27 of North Adams 

and Robert C. Ami were the senior 
winners in the white egg display. R. B. 
Chase of Taunton and S. I'. Marker of 
Assinippi won the white egg display for 
vocational students. 

Competition in the dream d <a|M>n and 

large roaster classes was rather keen, 

according to R. C. Bradley of New York, 

who jttdged the show. Robert C. Ames 
and Angelo A. Merlini won the four -year 
Capon (lass. Two-year winners were 
Ralph \Y. Anderson of Dorchester, George 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



Ten senior football men, the backbone 
of the 1926 eleven, will be graduated next 
June. Although dubbed "the little green 
team," this fall's eleven numbered many 
seniors in its ranks, both veterans and 
newcomers. Six of these same gridsters 
never played football before coming to 
M.A.C., an indication of the conditions 
under which Coach Core labors. 

Captain "Gerry" Amstein is the out- 
standing member of this group of ten. 
Mentioned by several sport writers as 
one of the l>est tackles among the small 
collagen of New England, he has also 
been one of the best football captains 
seen at Aggie in recent years. His deter- 
mination, his intelligence, ami his cour- 
ageous but firm insist ance on his rights on 
i he field have been particularly notice- 
able. Although he weighs only lii.'t 
pounds, he has outplayed his opponenta, 

and has not missed a minute of play 
throughout the season. 

"Andie" Anderson and "Truck'' ("ail 
wright, two dependable guards, ha\e 
been mainstay! in the center of the line. 
Neither played football last year. Steadi- 
ness and reliability have marked their 
play. "Lewie" Black, another guard who 
has been pursued by misfortune in the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Final Football Game 

Goes to Tufts, 45-13 

Agates Outrush Opponents, But Fail to Hold Flashy 

Tufts Back 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
HAS RECORD SEASON 



Undefeated in Five Dual 
Graduation of Five Seniors 
Difficult Task for Coach 



Meets. 
Leaves 
Derby. 



Frosh Eleven 
Has Good Season 



Phil Gouhig's Team Showed Up Well 
Against Heavier and More Experi- 
enced Teams. 



RELAY TEAM HAS THREE 

VETERANS OF LAST YEAR 



Practice for the relay team has started 
on the board track by the Drill Hall. 
The team is fortunate in having left three 
members of last year's team: Captain 
Hall, Henneberry, and Schappelle. How- 
ever, the loss by graduation of Sniffen, 
captain and anchor man on last year's 
team leaves a bad gap. There are several 
aspirants for this vacant position, one of 
the most promising of whom is Kay, a 
sophomore, who has had experience on 
the boards in high school. 



M.A.C. Radio Forum 

Has Large Audience 

Inquiries Received Evidence Public 
Interest. Program Announced. 



M.A.C". is now on the air again over 
station W'BZ at Springfield and judging 
from the queries which have been coming 
into the Forum which is being conducted 
by the College, this weekly broadcast on 
Tuesday evenings is widely listened to. 
Several broadcasts have already been 
made and they will be continued weekly 
at 7.1.5 p. m. and the following men have 
been scheduled to speak on subjects per- 
taining to their special fields of activity 
as well as to answer the more im|>ortant 
questions which have come in during the 
week. 

Dec. 7— Prof. Clifford J. F'awcett 
14 — Prof. Laurence F. Grose 
21— Prof. Wilbur H. Thies 
28— Mr. Robert Hawley 



Phil Couhig '2ti lias made- a good start 
as freshman COSCfe at M.A.C. by turning 
out a eUOOeawful footbnl team his first 
>n. Fhe record of the Ye arlinns shows 
three games won, and two l<;st by only 
small margins, out of the five on I lie 
schedule. During the season the Neo- 
phytes have amassed <>8 jxiints against 21 
made by their op|>onents. 

Ihe brand of football played has been 
characterised more by footwork and head- 
work than by crushing, charging (actus. 
Ihe team has played with a backficld, 

the m ereber i of which might be dubbed 

the four giant midgets. All are so small, 
from a football point of view, that 
op|Kjs : n^ teams have been inspired with 
a mistaken confidence before starting the 
Bane. This confidence has always been 
short lived, however, for this diminutive 
quartet has displayed a thoroughly dis- 
concerting speed and elusiveness and 
have proved that a man does not have 
to weigh 175 to be a deadly tackier. The 
line deserves no less credit than the back- 
field for the team's good record. As 
shown by the scores, a large part of the 
team's effectiveness has lain in its defense. 
No opposing team has been able to gain 
consistently through the line and the 
long runs made by the backfield have 
been made possiMe largely through the 
gexxl offensive work of the line. 

The first game of the season was against 
Northampton high and was won by a 
13-0 score. The Two- Years were the 
next victims, being decisively beaten 
16-0. A Deerfield Academy second team 
received a 39-6 trouncing in the next 
game, although the frosh were scored on 
for the first time. The first setback came; 
in the game with Greenfield high. Heavily 
outweighed the frosh lost 12-0 to a team 
which has turned out to lie one of the 
strongest nigh school teams in western 
Mass. The last game was the numeral 
contest with the sophomores. This game 
was evenly battled almost throughout 
but was lost by a three point margin. 

It is difficult to tell how members of 
this team might shape up as varsity 
material. Burbank, Drew, lillert, Guan- 
demico, Kneeland, Wecter, and a few 
others show some promise and, if they 
continue to improve, may be of assistance 
to the varsity next year. 



The cross-country season just finished 
has been undoubtedly the most success- 
ful in the history of the sport at this 
college. In five starts the Aggie harriers 
have finished first five times to hang up 
an undefeated record uneipialed by any 
of their predecessors. Many notable 
feats have been accomplished in piling 
up this string of victories and among t he 
vanquisned are most of the long-standing 
rivals of the team. 

The key-note of this success has be.n 
team work. The ttam jiossesses no out- 
standing star or stars. Sometimes one 
man has finished in the lead, sometimes 
another, but, regardless of who has been 
the first to break the tape, the rant hive 

H ii. illy been not far behind and the 

majority have finished well up in the 
front ranks of the pack. 

Perhaps the most out standing event of 

the season was the squelching of Amherst 

at Pratt field by a perferi I.'. .">0 Nora, 
Fhe whole team romped across the finish 
line seven abreast, far ahead of the firs! 
Amluist man, and then continued their 
jaunt bach to the Drill Hall. Another 
feature of the season was tlw P.) ;'.i \ ie 
tory over Williams when the latter re- 
ceived the third set back of their history, 

the first on their hone course. Ihe lm 

lili win over YVcslcyaii was |>erliaps less 
spectacular, but was none the less s.nis 
fying, for it was the first victory ovaj 
them in four years. < >f the other two 
i.iii ■-., cue Ml wi'h Tufts on the home 
course, and resulted in a M .'l.'l score. The 
other, tile last of the season, was will) 
IJ.U. at Franklin Park and was barely 
won by a 26-20 score. The men to whom 

the College owes this record are Captain 
(looks, Birou, Henneberry, Nottebaert 

and Swan of the chttU "t '27, and Preston 
'28, all of whom ha\e taken part in ev er) 
i. ue; .in«l Snell '29, who i.m in all but 
two. (rooks and Notteliaert have e.u h 
< Continued on P.itii- 2; 



BASKETBALL PRACTICE 
NOW WELL UNDER WAY 



Schedule Announced Has Five Home 
Games. Several New Opponents. 



Followers of M.A.C. basketball will be 
treated to a new type of play, according 
to present indications, for candidates for 
the varsity are being schooled in a man- 
to-man defense, in contrast to the five- 
man defense which has prevailed here 
for several years. 

Fhe presence of several new faces in 
the lineup makes this modification ap|>ear 
necessary. Ihe loss of the "three basket- 
eers ", Jones, Smiley, and Temple from 
the championship 1026 and 1030 quintets, 
deprives the squad of members accustomed 

to playing together. 

Conpetition for all positions is especi- 
ally keen, and tin lineup is wholly un- 
settled. Fhe leading candidates are (apt. 
Partenheimer, (irifhn, and Thomas, three 
letter-men, and Read and Mcl^wen, two 
juniors. 

The schedule arranged by Manager 
Haertl includes live home games out of 
thirteen. S ev er n ! new teams, including 
the Army, B.U., and Northeastern will 
be met. The list is as follows: 
Jan. 8— Clark at MAC 

10— U.S.M.A. at West Point 
21— B.U. at M.A.C. 
22 — Northeastern at Moston 
254 — Maine at Orono 
Feb. 4— Williams at M.A.C. 
8 — Trinity at Hartford 
16— W.P.I, at M.A.C. 
18 — Wesleyan at Middle! own 
26 — New Hampshire at Durham 
Mar. 2 — Middlebury at Middlebury 
3 — Vermont at Burlington 
0— Tufts at M.A.C. 



A hard-fighting, tmutl) impiovcd Mass- 
Angie eleven met a rival '.oo strong to be 
denied) and Tufa won the annual contest 
between the two colleges by a score of 
4. r » to 13 on Nov. 20 at Medford. The 
Agates undeniably played their best 
game of the season, but the Jumbos were 
fortunate- in having a track star, Taylor 
by name, who proved to lie a football 
luminary as well, with speed and shiftiness 
enough to enable him to cross the goal- 
line with frequency. 

M.A.C. had her bright lights in this 
final encounter, too, the work of Captain 
"Gerry" Amstein and "Red" Mahoney 
being particularly spectacular. 

Tufts took the lead within the first 
two minutes of play, on a perfect drop- 
kick by Fit/.gerald from the 50-yard line. 
Hanson's recovery of a blocked punt on 
the 18 yaid marker in the second quarter 
paved the way for the entrain <>! T.ivlor, 

who immediately proceeded to gain 

through l«ith sides of the line, and soon 
tallied. 

With the eon' It) to at the opening 
ol the second half, the Agates came back 
determined to even tin- count, and did 
amass 13 |M»ints, bul a sensational run- 
li.u k of a kic kolT for a touchdown by 
F.llis, tin- brown and blue quarterback, 
and tin- clever work ol I avlor, Fitzgerald 

ami Oabauh enabled the Jumbos to tally 

thrice. I n the closing minutes, Nussbaum 
picked up cine- of F.llis' punts for which 
then- had Imcii a general scramble, and 
trotted across the- goal line unmolested, 
the- referee i uliilg that an Agate had 

touched the oval prevlounty. 

The Aggies made a chive in the' first 

period, during which a 80*yard clash by 
"Bono" lulls and four successive fii-t 
deiwns seemed to presage a scon, but the 
op|K»sing line- suddenly Im-c .inn adamant, 
and "Bob" Bowie's attempted held goal 
failed. 

Flic- e h.nae lentil conn back of the- 
Gorenen came in the- second halt. "Jack" 
Ouinii, "Keel" Miliums, and "Al" Cook 
made outstanding gains, and a pcn.iliv 
placed the ball within tWO vanls from the 

goal, from erhence "Red" Mahoney went 

OVa via the left end. 

( apt a in Am h in' alertness in bloc king 

a punt on Tufa' 87 ynrd Ban paved the 

uav for the' final tally. Interfeieiic e cost 

tin Jumbos another penalty, and Cook 
knifed through center for the score. The 
opposing line- smothered "Bob" Bowie's 
bra) tiv fa the extra point, but his final 

one sailed In -I wee-ll the uprights. 

Both Aggie- ends, Bowie and Mc Kit- 
trick, played • dashing game-; in fact, t he- 
entire- M.A.< . line- was at its bant, and the 
backfield had more- |>ower than heretolore- 
this f.dl. A |x>st g.mie parang! of statistic* 
reveals that the- Agate-s were hardly e»ut- 
classed as the score would indicate-. Their 
punts were- ne-arly as good as those of the 
Jumbos; the v gained 312 yards; and they 
made- 12 first clowns by rushing, as com- 
pared with ."> made- by their op|>e>ncnts, 
or a total e>f I '» against 7. Fhe lineup: 

Mass. Aggie Tufts 

McKittriek, ie Ie, Bowke-r, Goldmun 

Amstein, n It, Hnntnon, Soute, Hngnn 
Black, Anderson, rg 

lg, Spotforel, Brown, Nussbaum 
(.■•tiiiiien-el on Page « 



HAKKIKRS nVENTH 

IN INTKRCOU.KGIATES 

Score Better Than Last Year. Swan 
and Crooks Lead Aggie Runners. 



The Aggie- harriers duplicated their 
performance of last year by taking 
seventh place in the New Faigland cross- 
country race- held in Booton, Nov. 15. 
The |M)int score-, howi-ver, shejwed an im- 
provement OVOF last year. The total 
number of points chalked up against the- 
team UM approximately 1 ">0, a decrease 

of thirty from Innl yum 'a score of iho. 

Twelve New England colleges entered 
team of seven men sat b to make- a total 
of about eighty participants. Of this 
number, the- first two Aggie men to 
finish were Swan who took nineteenth 
plac e and Captain Crooks who came in 
twentieth. 



- 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, PEC. 2, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, l'uplished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
William L. Dole 27 Kditor-in-Chief 

Ellswokih Hawnaki) '2K Managing KUitor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial William L. DOU Iff 

Athletic* JIakoi... K. CLAM » 

W. GOBDOM IIlNIKR "29 

Campus N<-wa Kknkst U Sim m M "88 

Faculty & Short COWM 1' hwakd H. Nicih.ls'29 
Intercollegiate Editor Ekan ( i.s C. ««')« '27 
Co-Ed News Josephine Panzic a 2S 



body of mi m shall have to try delinquents, 
for there should he no delinquents in 
college fraternities. Many fraternities 
deserve only commendation for their 
tactict. hut just as society must have its 
judicial system for the few who need 
penalising, so our campus really needs 
I his Trial Hoard. Kven if there are M 
delinquents, there will be suspicious 
characters who should have their nanus 
cleared in order to promote a wholesome 
atmospliere. We repeat that the Trial 
Hoard is a worthwhile organization. 



PERSONALS 



COMMUNICATIONS 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charles F. Clagg '27 Busin.ss Manage! 

LevU 11 Whitakbb -87 AdvwtWm Manager 

JOHN E. Wiuie '27 Circulation Manage. 

Dorci.AS W. LOBHMI *28 

Edwin A. Wilder 2s 

Harold K. Ansei.i. '29 

Lawrence A. Carruth '29 

William A. Ecav '29 



Subscription J2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

We noted with interest that our hand 
is co-ed also. We must admit that the 
yOUftg lady who. played the drums took 
her nerve in her hand, as the saying BJOM, 
and did a w>ut\ H* '» maneuvering with 
the rest of the musicians. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accreted for mailing «»t special rate 
of pontage provided for in section I .Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



SPIRIT 

We feel like patting ourselves on the 
hack after reading editorials from the 
columns of our exchanges. Whether it is 
a coincidence or the result of some 
definite situation, we have not vet 
decided; l>"t the fact remains that several 
college editors have deplored the "crab- 
bing", as one editor puts it, of I large 
number of undergraduates and others 

connected with the college. The situation 

in these colleges has apparently arisen 
from a football record which looks like 
ours, in essence at least. As we looic over 
our 1906 record now, it dot* not look 
like the footprints of a champion, to IB) 
the least. Vet we have heard very little 
"crabbing" over the fact. CM course 
there are a few more crabbers than if we 
had won every game (there are crablnrs 
even then, sometimes); but the spirit on 
the campus has been soiiicthiin; of which 
we may well be proud. The best concrete 
example is the last mass meeting. The 
-• •' »as huge and noisy. The pep was 
much as if we were about to 
me which would determine 
not we should have a dean 
^e crowd from here watched 
Medford; and they did not 
let any hush (all over them, like the one 
which symbolizes a beaten organization. 
Yes, we have not failed when we were put 

to the test. Prof. Hicks observed thai it 

took an off-season to gfo« us spirit, and 

apparently he was correct. Let us not be 

satisfied, lit us carry on through pros 

parity as well. We were much co n cerned 

about spirit early in the Near, but we 
have reason to feel quite optimistic, now, 
but not satisfied. 



While speaking of the band, however, 
let us commend it for its exhibition. 
Ansell certainly looked good cakewalkin^ 
at its head and the rest of the band 
entered into the spirit of the occasion 
with much gusto. The forming of the 
T and the M were done well and the 
playing of the college songs was a feature 
which deserves much praise, especially 
the playing of the "Brown and the Blue", 
because of its novelty. We have learned 
glace that the Tufts band had to come out 
of its stronghold the week before, be- 
cause their rival played the same song so 
slowly that the Tufts student body was 
handicapped in singing. 

* * * 
Amherst College's freshman banquet 

season is on. We read the rules governing 
the affair with some jealousy. It is en- 
tirely a free-for-all scrap. But the crown- 
ing limitation is that "The banquet must 
be held within seventy-five miles of 

Amherst." 

* * * 

The New Student has published a list 
of traditions and college dominances 
which have been overruled lately. This 
list is published as though such action 
were quite unusual. In this case, we are 
very much up to date. 

* * * 
The Muldlibury Campus recently pub- 

ished an editorial entitled "Why Not 
Sleep." The subject matter of course 
concerned chnpak and assemblies. Presi- 
dent Moody immediately responded with 
a lengthy communication. We gather 
that the editorial was directed rather 
personally against the executive, at least 
he has had to make an effort not to take 
it in this way. We may draw a lessen 
from the introduction of his answer which 
is as follows. " AVhy Not Sleep?* One 
word answers this question: courtesy, 
(jood breeding indicates that though we 
may not be interested in what a man 
says or thinks if we are gentlemen, we 
shall treat him as one and pay him the 
courtesy of respectful attention." 



Albert D. Taylor '05, nationally known 

as | landscape architect, recently began a 
comprehensive study of the campus of 
the OregOfl State College. His study will 
include a view of future expansion of 
the campus and recommendations for a 
suitable location for a new memorial 
building. 

P 

Kmily Smith '2o is assistant publicity 
and club agent in the Middlesex county 
extension service. 

George Lockwood '21 is with the 
Pittsfield milk exchange. 

Buddy Frost '24 is doing landscape- 
work in Boston. 

P 

Lester M. Holbrook '25 is in the 



The Collegian is at all times glad to pub hsh 
any communication! which may be nut to it, '"it 
the Editors will assume no responsibility for the 
views expressed, ind do not necessarily endorse 
such views. 



shipping department of the Creenfield 
Tap & Die Co., Greenfield, Mass. 

P 

Richard Smith '24 is now the Agricul- 
tural Statistician in the Federal Reserve 
Bank, San Francisco, California. He is 
also editor of a monthly paper published 
by the bank. 

Preston Davenport '26 is employed on 
the Belden Farm at Bradstreet, Mass. 

Frank Root '25 is working with the 
Seymour Packing Company at Topeka, 

Kansas. 

P 

Dr. Click and Spike Malley are giving 
a course in Vocational Psychology. 

P 

Dole, Barber and Ames will represent 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College at 
the Wesleyan Parley this week-end. 

P 

Doug boring did so well in his first 
paper on "Puppy Love" that the pro- 
fessor has asked him to write another. 

P-^— 

Here's the latest method for dating: 
Post your name and telephone number on 
the Abbey bulletin board and await 
results. See Mills and McKittrick for 
further particulars. 

P 

A new course has been added to the 
Home Be department: Target practice 
for cords This should be an invaluable 
course for the modern woman. 



RIGID RUSHING RULES 

The Interfraternity Conference, in an 
attempt to make the rushing rules mori 
significant, have established a new organi 
zation known as the Trial Board. This 
Board is essentially a court and a jury on 
rushing. The mechanics of the Board is 
similar to that of the Honor Council and 
like the Honor Council its biggest problem 
is identical with that of honor sv stem's 
guardian. The student body is the police 
force in rushing as well as in dassrocm 
matters. As the preamble of the Trial 
Board's Constitution indicates, the ef- 
ficacy of the Board depend! on the will- 
ingness of one and all to report cases of 
violation of the rules. This circumstance 
was believed to be a weakness of the 
Honor System, but WC have heard litt'c 
adverse criticism since the cnrral up- 
rising two years ago. It seems to us that 
the position of the Trial Board is en even 
firmer ground, for undergraduates have 
always been very ready to criticize the 
tactics of rival fraternities. Now that 
there is some hope of result from com- 
plaints to headquarters, why will not 
these complaints be submitted to the 
authorities? However, we feel that an 
appeal for co-operation from one and all 
is in order. Our appeal will be confiend 
to setting forth the situation, fcr the time 
being. 

This move on the part of the Inter- 
fraternity Conference is heartily approved 
by us. We have, in theory, one of the best 
rushing s y s tem s in this part of the country. 
If the rules can be made effective in some 
way we may say that our system is more 
than theory. We hate to think that 
severe penalties must be given for in- 
fringement of rules and that a definite 



We do not mean to infer that the 
situation at M.A.C. is alarming. We are 
merely dropping a hint to the few de- 
linquents, 

ANNUAL POULTRY SHOW 

(Continued from Page 1) 

W. Hall, Michael J. Ilnnnigan of Milford 
'and Ira ft Wile. The vocational course 
winners were S. P. Barker, A. W. Trefry. 
|. S. Rogers, and C. D. Dewar, Angelo 
A. Merlini and Robert C. Ames won the 
four-year large roaster class; Ralph W. 
Anderson and Michael J. Hannigan the 
two-year group; and Dewar and Trefry 
the vocational group. 



FINAL FOOTBALL GAME 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Mills, McAllister, Mulhern, c 

c. Cordon, Brehaut, Appiani 
Kelton, Cartwright, Plantinga, lg 

rg, Austin, Brown 
Walkden. Murdough, It 

rt, Sesson, Fitzgerald 
Bowie, le re, Fitzgerald, Reilly 

(Juinn, Cox, Tuttle, qb 

qb, Ellis, Ingalls 

Mahoney, Haertl, rhb 

p Ihb, Browne, Taylor, Clahault 
Tufts, Mahoney, Crowley, Ihb 

rhb, Schroder, Phillips 
Cook, Nitkiewicz, Johnson, fb 

fb, Marshall, Hingston 
Touchdowns made by: Taylor 3, Ellis, 
Schroder, Mahoney, Cook. Points after 
touchdown: Fitzgerald 6, Bowie 1. Coal 
from field: Fitzgerald. Referee: H. C. 
McGrath. Umpire: W. M. Finer. Lines- 
man: F. W. Lewis. Field Judge: P. N. 
Swafheld. Time: four 15-minute periods. 



SEVERAL GRID STARS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

shape of injuries for two years, recovered 
from an eaily season injury and played in 
the final games. His spirit and perform- 
ance have been commendable. 

"Eddie" Haertl, one of the three letter- 
men, and an adept receiver of forwards, 
was also the victim of an injury in t he- 
Conn. Aggie game, and has not been able 
to display his true ability this fall until 
very recently. "Red" Mahoney, another 
bach who received his schooling in foot- 
ball at M.A.C, developed from an 
erratic, but hard-running player into the 
most reliable ball-carrier of the team. His 
work in the Tufts game was little short 
of phenomenal. "Line" Murdough, the 
tackle who stood out so prominently in 
the Amherst game, has played throughout 
the season in a position which was entirely 
new to him. "Line" was shifted from the 
backfield to the line on account of the 
dearth of forwards, and he certainly filled 
up the holes when called upon. 

"Mac" lfcAKster, the hard-working 
ci nter, has also played his last gam for 
M.A.C. Light, but ambitious, he has 
served as sub-center for three years, and 
has seen considerable service. He is also 
an all-Aggie product. 

A survey of the senior giidsttrs would 
not be complete without mention of 
"Skilly" Spellnian and "Spike" Malley, 
two persistent substitutes. The firmer, 
after dkpMymf marked ability last year, 
had the mi fortune to break his leg this 
fall, and so lost a chance to git into 
several games. Malley, the jokesmith of 
the squad, has heen a big factor in main- 
taining the morale of the team, and 
although not naturally endowed with a 
football physiqtte, has been a persistent 
cempetiu r dur'ng his college course. 

This group cf players, the backbone of 
a developing team, will be sorify missed 
next year. The eleven was just reaching 
its power, just being molded into a unit, 
when the season ended. The 1926 team 
because of it- courageous spirit, will go 
down in the history of Aggie football as 
one truly worthy of rep esenting M.A.C, 
even though the records in the scoring 
columns do not bes| eak geat achieve- 
ment. 



To the Collegian and 

To Whom It May Concern: 
With the close of the most discouraging 
football season since the war, which 
ended with the Tufts debacle, I have re- 
ceived so many messages, verbally, by 
mail and by wire from alumni, alumni 
clubs, faculty, students, friends of the 
college, etc., that it would be impossible 
for me with our present facilities to 
answer them; hence this letter through 
the courtesy of the Collegian. 

All messages received took cognizance 
of the difficulties experienced by the 
coaching staff this fall in developing a 
respectable football team, and were ex- 
pressions of confidence and loyalty. It 
seems unfortunate that it takes adversity 
sometimes to bring varying minds to- 
gether, but the words of confidence re- 
ceived certainly have been appreciated by 
the department, the coaching staff, the 
team, and personally. 

A word as to the team: a splendid 
group of typical Aggie men, clean-living, 
hard-working, conscientious, who did not 
"curl under" at any time this fall, who 
improved every Saturday and, strange as 
it may seem, played their best game of 
the season against Tufts. Perhaps 1 can 
best tell you of the calibre of the young- 
sters when I tell you that since the game- 
five of the players have been in to see me 
and said that the boys were discussing 
giving up their football letters and not 
receiving any sweaters l%cau.se of the 
poor record made. 

In closing, this letter is not to be 
considered at all as an alibi. We are not 
enumerating the difficulties of producing 
a creditable football eleven at Aggie, (we 
feel that is our job), nor are we trying to 
alleviate the impressions resulting from 
a perfectly rotten season, although there- 
have been several worse in our history. 
I do want to emphasize the fact that we 
have appreciated the splendid spirit ex- 
hibited by alumni, students, and faculty 
in supporting a losing team. I want to 
tell you that from the standpoint of edu- 
cational values alone the season has been 
worth while. Several men found them- 
selves and made good, and although a 
losing team, it was always a courageous 
one. And the last point I want to make 
is that we are in no way satisfied with 
the results and started, on the bus trip 
home from Medford, to lay plans to re- 
turn Aggie to the football win column. 
Signed : 

"Kid" Core. 



than something we know nothing about.'' 
Scientists, strange as it may seem, q ;i 
never deal with the problem of genuii 
ncss. Our chapter of knowledge is b. 
upon relationships which are obser\. 1 
among phenomena; the history of the 
atom can easily demonstrate it. Further, 
research faces another difficulty, whi«h 
is sujx-rnormality. Supernormality is 
belief in our own ignorance. When one 
fails to prove normal a medium's mani- 
festation, he has not proved it sup. 
normal; he has simply failed to prove it 
anything at all. So that science "cam | 
deal with the problem of supernornialn , 
which remains a matter of faith without 
proof." 

Yet people have ceased to believe m 
phantasm and have ceased to SJOrthip 
ghosts. The twentieth century laughs g| 
the naive Uliefs of our forefathers an I 
pities "contemporaneous cave men" in 
whose minds traditional "immortality- 
beliefs" exist. But beware! Let us n t 
think always in terms of the present. 
History and discovery have taught us 
many valuable lessons. There is slwsyi 
fear lest the thirtieth century will speak 
of us as civilized cave men, wrapped ig 
partly colored cloaks of ignorance and 
cherishing phantastic beliefs cf glandular 
emotions and chemical manifestations of 

life. 

C. P. Laday 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 
completed three seasons on the team while 
Biron, Henneberry, Preston and Saw 
have seen two years of service. This is 
the first season for Snell, the only sopho- 
more to make the ham. A winning tea* 
is always acclaimed by the student body, 
Nevertheless, too much cannot be siiil 
for the memljers of this team; if for no 
other reason, for the hard and faithful 
work which they have put into their 
training for a sport which has little ol the 
excitement and glamor common to many 
others. 

With only two veterans remaining, 
indications are doubtful as to the sin 
of next year's team. Several juniors, in- 
cluding Forrest, Owers and Roper nude 
strong bids for this year's team, and there 
are also a number of sophomores who 
show promise. Among these are Dutton, 
who took part in the B.U. race, Edna, 
Henderson and South wick. The race !*•- 
tween the M.A.C. and Amherst freshmen 
brought to light several members of the 
class of '30 who may shape up well SOl 
year, including Herman, Jacobson, Tiff- 
any and White. 



To the Editor 
of the Collegia 

Asked by Crito how he wished his 
friends to bury him, Socrates replied, "In 
any way you like— if you can catch me." 
This conviction of the soul's indepen- 
dence of the body, as a musical harmony 
independent of the instrument used for 
its expression, was slowly reached in the 
course of intellectual development. The 
idea of some kind of body, as necessary 
to soul, has indeed never been given up 
in any form of faith, ancient or modern. 
The cave man would never have 
thought of life itself as separate from the 
earth. He distinguished between light 
and darkness only, not between the seen 
and the unseen. Darkness for him did 
not extend its domain to Hades. He had 
not even a mythology. 

Age after age passed by. With the 
awakening of the creative faculty and 
creatively projective imagination, the 
history of human soul begins. There 
were people who believe in phantasm, 
people who cherished superstition, and 
people who believed in immortality. Each 
age had its own peculiar beliefs, but the 
persistent belief which travelled through 
all ages up to our time, was that in the 
immortality of soul. Modern age differs 
from the preceding ones. Science, the 
supreme autocrat of modern knowledge, 
in order to get rid of troublesome medium - 
and to advance the knowledge into the 
realm cf psychic manifestations, organized 
"psychical research". 

It was hoped that psychic research would 
establish the truth and reveal the mecli- 
umistic friends. By that, the investi- 
gating scientists sought to prove or to 
disprove the genuineness of certain 
supernormal phenomena. Many cases 
were tried, and the most recent one, of 
Margery, J demonstrated the fact that 
research cannot prove the supernormal, 
"for the supernormal is nothing more 



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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DEC. 2. 1926 



3 



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PlMCft I 111 II (luin 51 

'Mi Ni.lmlson) Flori 89 

Gtnaaa i i; And Chan BO 

(Mr. Julian) 1 ami (ill 7.") 

Aim -•"> 1 M I'oiill 7."> 

Monduy, 111-12 a. in. 

(..mi. ui 1 IV & VI R II lit,. M 

(. Ml M Km 00 

Ptoses i in & vii i .in.i t„i n 

in Dairy W 

Di.iwiiiK -."> II Wll 

Monday, 2-4 p. m. 

Kiik atjj G Aud & lis Flori .Mi 



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817 



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G L'li Hon Mf| 7.') 11. »• 



Tuesday, Dec. 14, 7.50-9.50 a. 



hi Sin •_'."> 
Ak Be 50 
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Daily ..ii 

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(.riin.in 50 I 
Hurt 50 



114 

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Ml II 

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Math 00 
Mil i.. 00 
An K.I 00 
Kami Mitt 76 
Math 76 
Vcb G.I 75 



Tuesday, 10-12 a. in 
Afric I <• Ami, M, ■ l.aii.l (1.1 70 
Km liO Bl D I'cmi 75 

Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 

Kimlish M Km 5.-I 

Mr. Nitliolaon G Aud litem 50 
Mr. 1'iiiii ■ 1 1 1 Kri'iu h 75 

Mr. Ran.! 113 & III I'oult It 

AiBaafiO mi 



Mil » 

M 00 

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317 



Wednesday, Dec. 15, 7.50-9.50 a. m 



( .ii man I 

Preach IB 

( hi man 25 
Gel man 2s 
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Kiik 65 

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Rui S... .Ml 
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Km ,.. 
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Pot* 77 
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Wednesday. 10-12 a. m. 

/.k.I 2ti KIM) & (II A \.t 7S 
Km 51 KH K 

Wednesday, 2-4 p. m. 

Knnli-h 1 K.ir.Miy .".."i 

Mi. Nichoiaoa (. Ami Gerraaa 00 II 
Mi I'.itt.ixiii Post* 00 

ill & no /.".I 00 

Mr. I'rinrf 1115 & 111 An K. 7<l 
Mr. Rami G 2S An llu< 75 

Bel 00 < II A M..11 75 

Thursday, Dec. lb, 7.50-9.50 a. m. 

Mil I (HA N..1111-.I1 00 Ml I 

R II Kill- 1 102 A« K.I 71) 11(1 

Mil 00 KH I) I-.. S... 75 Ml |) 

Bag 01 Ittli in Math 75 |fl B 

Mil BO Mil I) Mil 75 Mill, 



Ml I) 

I Hi 

(. 00 

KH K 

Wll 

Wll A 

\ I. II 



VI. H 



111 I) 

G SO 

:t 17 

Bl I) 

G 21 i 

217 
Ml ( 



Thursday, 2-4 p. m. 

I lain 1 (i Ami 2»i, H ChSS* I (• Ami ! ' 

Friday, Dec. 17, 7.50-9.50 a. m. 

Phyak i ii i) ,\ i ii \ 

Friday. 10-12 a. m. 

Math I Mr. Ma. Inn. i 102 

Mi HaiU-i 111 Mi. M,,oir 

\ii Install G Ami Mil B. I). G 

By Vii.iiiU.iii.nl 
Mum 00 I'nl, Spk 00 

M Bi 00 r ii Ufa 50. B0, 70. si 

■ol BO, 7s Opsnlah 7;. 

Micro si. s2 /,„,i .-,:;. 75 

I WO-YKAR EXAM. SCHEIH1.K 

Thursday, Dec. lb, 7.50-9.50 a. m. 



Aa Baa s:i 

An Be si 



Anion SI 

Flori s.t 



An Ilus S,t 
Daily SI 
Daily S2 



12 
(. 00 



Em si 



Thursday, 10-12 a. m. 

t. Ami Km s.„ 11 

Ml C Va| Gal. I S.'l 

Thursday, 2-4 p. m. 

102 Moil SI 

Kl. M I'oult s, 

PLO 



Friday, Dec. 17, 7.50-9.50 a. m. 



An llns SI 
An Kim SI 
Kloii Sli 
lh.it S2 

An Kiik S7 
lloil S.'. 
Hon Mi K i» SI 



102 
110 
Ml ( 
Ml 11 



Mli re S2 

I'ol.l s.t 
l'oull S.I 
\.n (...1.1 SI 



Friday. 10-12 a. m. 

12 Pom SI 
Ml II I'oin s, 
I I M I'oult SI 



Ml K 



I II D 
Ml I) 



III I 
111) 



M OB 
Wll It 

111 
I II I 

KM K 

Wll B 

I I I 



Town Hall, Amherst 



By \i i. inn. in. in 
An OppOtl SI Horn, K. SI 



The dilagStSS from the CotlcfB to the 

.oioo.il mirtiiio, nl id,- l.iinil (Irani 
Colleges AsMKi.it ion, whirl) was held at 

Washington, Nov. iti in, s*ers PrasktMl 
Kilw.ml If. Lewis, Director Sidney B. 
HsskeO, Director Will, ml A. sfonsnn, 
.on I Miss Edns L. Skinner. 



Mr. Paul R. Nelson "24 has Ihcii 
ap|M»inted to suireed Mr. (.erahl I- . 

Gillignn as Investigator in Chemistry Bi 
the Experiment Station. Mr. Nekon re- 

niveri his M.S . at Lafayette last spring 
anil at present is employed liy the Karit.m 
Copper ( onipany at I'erth Amlxiy, N.J. 



Nod. 
Thura. 

.iii«, 

7.. 10 

One 

Show 

at Nlftht 



Friday 

.1.00 
S.45. S...10 



Saturday 
BJO 

i. is N Ml 



Special I Special I BpscaSl 

"•TBI . \ DAI l as" th 
■creeae greet .motional 
epic in uiv«- a ae* reelteric 

H'H'l:il ill of roman. <• dril- 
iii. i'- i' o.i \Kl.l ox-ray of a 
mri\ love-ltfe. "II..I with 
fcei'iH . alWewlth hutahtor. 
I't.ti mi mii with pa thai, Ii 
» III Ntlr you . •■ell >■>(• . and 
hoi.i you spellbound wlih 
lis aewer anil lln ill . 

Price* i 
Mat. t li till 25. adults, lie 
Boor, 26c Kv,' halt on y 4(1. 



Ion (.lian«'\ In "'I 111'. 
KOAIi TO MANDALAY." A 

1 1> i ill iiiu . ilirolitilnu ro- 
in a m <• of HiaSapore, the 
mysterious. Attains) a 

ulaiiioi.ni- .. ol.ii I nl oi tin I ..I 
s.i llnu . In told tills powerful 
tale of the ilerelli I \» ho wins 
i ..I. in in Ion In one brief 
blaalnS moment of lira in a 
Spin tliiilit Harold Lloyd 
Comedy "Never Weaken." 



•si'ANGI K.N' 1 mill Mur- 
loll Niton and I'll! ( •'Mallei . 
Iloliar! HosmoiiIi ft t.l.uli* 
Km knell \ i in os pit lure 
that out-c triune* liar nu in •■ 
hi niliiU with showmanship 
•pulslim with ill. una an. I 
tin ills -1I.1//I um In ilHswIf I- 
ii.ss -lilll lerlnU with i In us 
atmosphere 
News 2 Keel Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
ONI FOURTH OFF 

This advert Uement will be accepted as J 
part cash 

advertising? 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

KKAR AMIIKRST BANK 



f trice on any Golf llutf 
.oif Club. 



Tennis 
Hoes anyone read our 



Framed Pictures 



IN COLORS 



$1.00 to $3.75 



Thursday, 10-12 a. m. 

An litis 00 101 Ak K.I BO 

Horl BO MI P Hot To 

Hot Bl ( II H Km s.", 

IMiysi. s .VI PL it lion hffmOO 



110 
( II A 
Kit K 
11. M 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleassnt Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First boUOC south of campus. 
Telephone 511 



Values Extraordinary 
IN 

Leather and Suede 

Jackets 



1 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Sol 



es 



Special on 
Shoe Repair 
and Heels $ 1 .50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



James a. Lowell, Bookseller 



Loose Leaf Note Books 

Dictionaries 

M. A. C. Stationery 

Fountain Pens 



M. A. C. Seal Jewelry 
Watch Fobs, Paper Cutters 
Rings, Vanity Cases 
Bar Pins, Charms 



TYPEWRITER PAPER 500 SHEETS 



90 cents 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 



"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



THANKSGIVING... 

Means looking your best when you're home for the big feed. Everything we show is of the latest style and highest quality. 
Our prices speak for themselves. We have some especially fine silk Scarfs at - $2.00 to $4.50 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



— JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

DEUEL'S ANTISEPTIC THROAT PASTKLLES will relieve hoarseness, 
tickling and Bronchial ailments. Pleasant and Effective. 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



BEAT TUFTS 

Go down to see' that game in one of Bolter's Overcoats Come in early for the clothes you'll need this weekend 

New shipment of Ties and Mufflers. 

CARL H. BOLTER "*annis 

AMHERST 



EXETER 












THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DEC. 2, 1926 




III 1 1)1 I III KC HATS 
Winter winds now sweep » !»«• c i mpm. 

Autumn now is on t lit- wane, 
Autumn bids | ltd farewell, 
Hut autumn colors still remain. 

Shades of orange-, green, and purple-, 
Yellows, blues, and screaming reds, 

Are M longer worn by Nature, 
Hut u|)on collegiate heads. 

For these hats of Heidclburg 
Respect neither youth nor age, 

Every one must have his beer cap, 
Now that beer caps are the rage. 

Each of us to be in fashion, 

Must go buy a hat in haste, 
Though Modesty and Virtue blush 

At such perverted taste. 

Oh alas! for human frailty! 

Human minds are warped and bent, 
When men think beer caps can make them 

Handsomer than Nature meant. 

E. B. 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 

AGGIE INN - =====?= 




TWO YEARS LOSE TO 

TRINITY JUNIOR VARSITY 



TWO-YEAR NOTES 



The Two- Year eleven met defeat at 
the hands of the Trinity Junior Varsity 
last Saturday on the latter's home field 
by a 20-0 score. Trinity started its 
scoring in the first period, taking the ball 
on a 60-yard drive for a touchdown follow- 
ing the kick-oft. The ball changed hands 
frequently during the rest of the half with 
the ball usually in Two- Year territory. In 
the third period the Shorthorns were 
pushed back to their 5-yard line. A 
short punt gave Trinity the ball on the 
20-yard stripe and the second touchdown 
resulted in three plays. In the fourth 
quarter Burleigh of Trinity intercepted a 
forward pass and ran 63 yards for another 
touchdown. 



Volney V. Tefft, 2yr.'27, has been 
awarded a tuition scholarship loan by 
the Two- Year Alumni Association. This 
loan is interesting in that it is the first 
scholarship of its kind to be awarded and 
it is the plan to add to the number of 
these scholarships as rapidly as possible 
in the future. 



Academy of Music— beginning 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. Wed. Dec. 1st 

EVENINGS at 8.15 Saturday Mat. at 2.15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 

PAUL HANSELL, Manager 
In J. Hartley Manners' Comedy of Happiness 

"Peg O' My Heart" 

PRICES: 50c. 85c. $1.10, Including Tax-Mail Orders Filled. 
NEXT WEEK— 4 Days, Beginning Wednesday, Dec. 8th 

"Passing of the Third Floor Back" || 



Prof. Clark L. Thayer, Mr. Bushy and 
Prof. Alexander A. Mackimmie took part 
in the production of the religious drama 
entitled "A Certain Rich Man" which 
was given in North Amherst Monday 
night, Nov. 15. This play was given in 
connection with the exercises celebrating 
the hundredth anniversary of the North 
Church of Amherst. 



DRESS PUMPS 

— AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



You will And an excellent 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-dnt* Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-St., - Opp. New Theatri 

We understand your rtquirtmtnts and art prt- 

pared to meet your needs. 

All work guaranteed. Shots shined and dytd, 60c 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



SING ' JEE HANP *•*"»">«! 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Ma« 

Our Laundry First Qui 

Our Policy Guaranty 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Pott Office 



44 SNOW STORMS!! 

According to the prediction* of the astrono- 
mers we are to have 44 snowstorms this winter 
Remember, we are well supplied with 
RUBBER FOOTWEAR, such as Overshoes, 
Rubbers, Rubber Boots, etc. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A. fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

. ,,«.., Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
d Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 
to be Mailed. 



SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man 1 



.»* 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 




nshine 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



WHEN Greek of calculus gets you into a tight 
corner, tic a tin to trouble — a tidy red tin of 
Prince Albert! Tamp a load of this really 
friendly tobacco into the bowl of your jimmy- 
pipe and light up. Watch the sun crash through 
the clouds with every puff! 

P. A. can't bite your tongue or parch your 
throat, no matter how fast you feed it, because 
the Prince Albert process gave Bite and Parch 
the air at the start. Cool as a Laplander's lap. 
Sweet as apple cider. Fragrant as spring blos- 
soms. That's Prince Albert! 

One pipe-load invites another. And . . • 
you can hit P. A. from morning till midnight 
and it won't hit back. Don't put off to tomorrow 
what you can smoke today. Get a tidy red tin 
of P. A. and turn on the sunshine • • 



P. A. it told everywhere in 
tidy red tint, pound and half- 
pound tin humidor >, and 
pound cryiteJ-gUti humidors 
with tponge-moittener lop. 
And always with every bit 
of bite and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert procett. 



now! 



? 



|>RINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 




\h 



© 1926, R. T. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Overcoats and Mufflers 

- - A wide selection for the cold days ahead - - 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAW 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



jgltg iMaaMrfrttggttB (EoUpmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DEC. 8, 1926 



Number 10 



AGGIE REVUE 

NEARLY READY 



Movie is Uncompleted, But Other 
Good Numbers Wi 1 Be Substituted. 



The annual presentation of the Annie 
Ktvue will be presented next Friday 
evening in Stockbridge Auditorium as 
die second entertainment of the year 
under the auspices of the Social Union. 
|t has Ik en decided that it will be utterly 
impossible to complete the motion pic- 
ture as was originally intended but a 
ur\ interesting program has been ar- 
ranged in its place by the Roister Doistef 
Di.unatic Society and a few other mem- 
Ik- of the undergraduate body. 

In spite of the fact that the motion 
picture could not be developed in time 
for its presentation at this time, the 
project is being carried on by A. Rodger 
Chamberlain '27 and will be presented at 
■MM date in the near future. The scen- 
ario was written by Professor Frank 
I'r nt ice Rand and Neil C. Robinson '27. 

The general program of the Agg ; e 
Revue will be made up of four separate 
parte. The Roister Doisters will present 
,i one-act play entitled "If Men Played 
Cards As Women Do". The characters 
who will take part are all well known for 
their excellent ability. They are as 
iollows: Donald H. Campbell '27, Max- 
well H. Goldberg '2K, Frank F. Homeyer 
28 and Leonard W. Morrison '29. 

Mr. Smart and his company will put 
i mi ■ short play of some sort but nothing 
i- known alx»ut it as yet, not even the 
name, so that an element of mystery 
predominates, enchancing its attract i ve- 
in- v. 

Harold K. Ansell '29 will stage a 
musical act entitled "4"> Musical Minutes 
trom Station WMAC, Jaki • II. ■< ul 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Outing Club Hears 

Talk by Prof. Hicks 

Illustrated Lecture on Western 
Scenery Received With Much 

Interest. 



The M.A.C. Outing Club held a very 
interesting social meeting last Thursday 
evening in French Hall. The principal 
interest was in an illustrated lecture 
which Professor Curry S. Hicks gave on 
the western trip which he took la>t 
summer. He showed views of many of 
the scenic beauty spots of the West, 
including Yellowstone National Park, 
Rocky Mountain National Park, the 
redwoods of California, the Columbia 
River Highway, and the Glacier National 
Park. 

The erection of the cabin of the Outing 
( luh on Mt. Toby is progressing very 
rapidly. The foundation is now com- 
pleted and the material for the frame has 
bfcw purchased. The Club will attempt 
to complete tru- building of the frame on 
next Saturday if the weather conditions 
are favorable. Many of the Club's mem- 
bers will be on hand tr assist and the 
services of any others who are interested 
»ould be appreciated. 



Leaders of Aggie Teams 

In Fall and Winter Sports 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"Frail as the leaves that quiver on 

the sprays, 
Like them man flourishes, like them 
decays." 

— Homer. 



Wednesday — 

'•Ice. Club Concert at Veterans' 
Hospital, Leeds. 
Thursday— 

Assembly: Ramsey Muir, Member 
British Parliament and author 
of distinction. 
Int.rclas, Basketball: '29 vs. 2-Yr., 
'■><> vs. '27. 
Friday— 

'"' p. m. The Aggie Revue. 
Sunday 

i m. Sunday Chapel: Bishop 
I homaa F. Davie* of Springfield, 
Bishop of W est e r n hfaeaachuattta 
Monday through Friday— 

ln 'd Examinations, 
rrMay, Dec. 17 

1 erni ends. 





PARTEM I EI MER 
Basketball 

MUSICAL CLUBS WILL 
HAVE NEW FEATURES 

Double Quartet in Men's Glee Club, 
and Double Trio in Girls' Glee Club 
are Special Attractions. 



In addition to the regular program this 
year, the various units of the Musical 
Clubs are working up ■pedal feature ■ 
which should prove a great asset to the 
concerts in providing little variations 
which should In- entertaining as well as 
amusing. 

The Men's Glee- Club, under the 
leadership of Clarence M. Parsons, will 
offer several new features when the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Cotter's Saturday Night 
Given Good Reception 

First Social Union Entertainment is 
Successful. Singing Wins Applause. 



The first Social Union entertainment of 
the season was held last Friday evening 
at 7 o'clock in Bowker Auditorium when 
"The Scottish Musical Comedy Com- 
pany'' presented "The Cotters Saturday 
Night." The sketch, dramatized by one 
of the members of the company, was 
based on Robert Burns' poem. Some of 
the old songs for which Scotland is so 
famous were sung during the performance, 
among which were: "John Anderson My 
Jo," "Loch Lomond." "Duncan Gray," 
and "Scots Wha Hae." The peculiar 
costumes of the peasants together with 
their Scottish accent added to the realism 
of the play. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



COLLEGE OFFERS SPECIAL 

COURSE IN HOME-MAKING 



Amherst home makers will have a real 
opportunity for a winter's voc a ti o n of 
study at a special ten-weeks' course for 

women, which opens at the College, Jan. 
3 and lasts until March 11. 

"Mothers and young women are realiz- 
ing the value of special and expert in- 
struction in the various phases of home 
making, and it is for their special heeds 
that this ten weeks' course is to be offered 
by the Home Economics department," 
declared Miss Ivlna L. Skinner, head of 
the department. 

Food and clothing for the family, 
family health, and home management 

will be the principal courses on instruc- 
tion offered. MiSS I bleu Knowlton, 

Assistant Professor ol Home Economics 
trill have chargi ol the food courses; 
Miss Marion I.. Tinker. .Wi-tant Ex- 
tension Pr o fes sor ol Home Economic i, 

the clothing courses; and Mi-s Skinner 
i he courses in family health and home 
management . 



HALL 
Relay 



FOREST CROOKS 

Hockey Crosscountry 



AM STEIN 
Football 



Sev er al noteworthy distinctions are 
evident anions captains of current s|>oits 
here at M.A.C William (.erald "< .erry" 
Anisteiii '2f, captain of the 1926 football 
eleven, anil Merrill H. "Part" Parlen 
heimer '27, iaptain of the 1037 banket 
ball team both hail from nearby points 

in the Connecticut Valley. "Gurry' 1 

COOtes from South Deerfi Id, while "Part" 

hails from Greenfield. 

Clarence A. "Tccdy" (rooks '27 of 
North Hrooklield, has had the honor ol 
being iaptain of an undefeated Aggie 

team, the 1906 c r o w -c ou ntry iqund, 

which won five dual meets over opponents 

including such strong teams as We-sh-yan 
and Williams. 

Two junior captains will lead teams 
into action this winter, an unusual 
incurrence. The) are J. Stanley Hall of 
Lynn, chief of the relay sipiad, and 
Joseph II. Forest Ol Arlington, captain of 
the hoc key Sextet, which include two 
other junior letter-men, Howard J. 
Abrahamson and Paul F. Frees of W'al- 
thaiu. 

Amstein, appointed acting-captain at 
the opening of ho tilities in the fall, BRUS 

subsequently elected to the position by 

his team-mates, and has distinguished 
himself lx>th as a leader and as B player. 
He has been one of the most aggressive 
and alert captains M.A.C. has ever had, 

yet he has retained the r esp e c t of all his 
op p o ne nts and of the officials who have 

come in contact with him. As a player, 

he has been nominated as a tackle by 

several sports writers for the All- New 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Twelve Games on 
Hockey Schedule 

Four Le ter Men Report for Pre- 
season Practice. 



AWARD LETTERS 
IN FALL SP0R 



lis 



fc 



Twenty Pool ball Letters Aw»r. J. 
Five Members of Cross-Coi "y 
Team Win Recognition. 



M.A.C . will not ener the N.K.I. 
Hockey League this year, for the Aggie 
schedule' already includes twelve' en- 
counters, which will Ik- enough unless 

Weal her c iindil ions are unexpectedly good. 
(Continued on Paget 2) 



Preston Will Lead 

Cross-Country Team 

Veteran of Two Seasons Receives 
Honor by Unanimous Vote. 



By unanimous vote of the letter men 
of the cross-country team, (diaries P. 
Preston of Dan vers, Mass., has been 
elected captain of cross-country for the 
coming season. He has the distinction 

of having been a m ember of a team 

which lejst only one race in the past two 
sca-ons, he himself having contributed 
no little part to the making of this 

record. He has run practically every 

race- during the last two seasons and has 
distinguished himself sever a l times. He 
will be- the only le'tter man left Oil the 
team, and, with Snell '2'.), will form the 
nucleus of next year's warn. 






NOTICE 

The next issue of tb Collegian 

will not be printed lint il WedtX 

day 'an. ">. 1927, because ol the 



Chris 






ion. 



FRATERNITY MEN HEAR 
OF NATIONAL MEETING 



Marsh, Delegate from M.A.C, Re- 
ports Proceedings of National Inter- 
Fraternity Conference at New York. 



Kclwin K. Marsh, delegate to I lie 
National 1 ndergraehiate- Interfraternity 
Conference in New York on Nov. 2<i .m<| 
27, gave a rc|)ort of his trip at I meeting 

of the M.A.C. Interfraterm'tv Co nfer ence 

last Thursday night. The consensus of 
opinion at the convention in regard to 
deferred rushing was that it was success 
ful in large institutions, but was unneces- 
sary in smaller colleges, More- friendliness 

between fraternities was a topic- which 
was favored, and I pJoa for more e-o- 

operatioB with visitation of fi c er s was 

made. 

Penalty for infringement of rushing 
rules in some- colleges mean the for- 
feiture- eif a IkhicI varying from fifty to 
five hundred dollars, according to Marsh, 

who compared that with our penalties, 

Forty-tun colleges were represented at 

tin- undergraduate convention. 

Hart well E. Roper, I- rank I- . llomeye-r, 
and James H. Cunningham wen named 
.is .i committee to supervise the- lnte-r- 
fraternity Sing which will Ik- held on 
Feb. 12, and the President appointed 
Alfred C. Morrill, h. Parker Ryan, and 
Roland E. Reed to revise or a p pro ve 
rushing rules for next yen 



Twenty five- nun received awan of 
litters for participation in fall s|»orts at 
a recent meeting ol the Joint Committee 
on Illteicolle-giate Athletics on December 

1. Twenty football players, including 
eleven Beaton, were awarded the arge 
football "M" ior the ii aflbrta th ■ year, 

Only three ol these- n'idste-i had pie- 
viously gamed the distinction. At the 
MOM time, h\c- mi-mlM-rs ol this fall's 

undefeated cross country sound were 
granted the "clfc" (or niacins in certaia 

meets. p< in ol the- live- . re -cmors, and 

three had u-i eivad the award before. 

Those awarded the football insignia 
w.ie- VYi!liaiii*< .. Anistcin '27, of South 
Dccilicld, captain; Daniel C. Hanson "27, 

oi Dracut, nuuMgar; L wi^ H. Black 27, 

Williamsburg; Carlton ( >. Cutwright '27, 
Northampton; Edwin J. Haartl '27, 

Jamaica Plain, John J. Mahoney '27, 
\\. t held; Kelwin L. Miinlough '27, 
Springlie'cl; Andrew B. Anderson '27 
Hudson; Joseph A. Mallev '27, Watrr- 
town; Albeit F« S|H-lman '27, N.w Lon- 
d< n, Conn.; Robert G« McAutatar '27, 
Millerica; AIIm-n C. Cook '2X, Wavcily; 
Richard C^Kakon "S8, v Hubbarantoni 
John F. Quins '2K, New Bedford, Warren 

J. Tults '2S, |. untie a Plain; Chaile-s K. 

Walkdea '2'.t, Swansea; Robert L. Howie 

19, Mill on; Clifton K. Johnson '21), 
Worcester; Taylor M. Mills '20, Jamaica 
Plain; Kenneth T. McKittrick '29, 
Jamaica Plain. 

The recipients of th«- cross-country 
letters were: ( lare-nce A. Crooks '27, 
captain, from North Hrookficlcl; Raphael 
A. Biron '27, Amcsbtiry; T. Vincent 
llcnnclx-rry '27, Manchester; Frederick 
W. Swan "27, Milton; Charles P. Preston 
'2H, Danvers. 



Interfraternity League 

Starts Next Term 



Schedule Arrangements Much As 
Last Year. Changes in Eligibility 
Rules. 



I be interfrate-rnity basketball series 
will open Jan. 4. The schedule is similar 

« . .ii 1 1 ii ii. ,1 on P. ■ lie- .<) 



RELAY SCHEDULE IS 

PRACTICALLY ARRANGED 



Relay practice- is continuing e>n the- 
board track. Several new promising 
candidates have come out including 
Foley '27, Rice- '27, He-arse '28, Roper 
'2K, Cleaves '2!», ami Soiithwck '2'.). 

Several freshmen are also keeping in 
prad i' c-. 
Three relay races have- been scheduled 

for the winter term and there is a po -i 

bility of more. I he schedule stands a 

folios 

Jan. S3— B. C at K.ofC Meet, Me has 

ic s Huilding, Bosti n 
Feb. •"' Amherst, Bates, at B. A. A. meet, 

Boston Arena. 
I,b. 22 W.P.I, at Worcester. 
Springfield Armory meet i l>ilit\. 



1927 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

SHOWS SEVERAL CHANGES 



Only Three Games Will Be PI yed 
In Amherst. Middlcbury is New 
Opponent. 



The l'.»27 football sc he-cbilc- which has 

ii-ce-iitly bean published, i^ one which 

will b highly pleasing to members of the 
football BQUad, for it inc ludc-s five games 
which will be played on foreign fie-lds in 
places more- or less remote-. 

Middle-bury is a newcome-r on the list, 
ami replaces Co nne cticut Aggies, while 
Norwich is once- more- oru- of Mass. 
Aggies' opponent! aft«-r a lapse of one 
ye-ar. Only two contests, the- dual ones 
ol the season, will take place on Alumni 
lielcl. The s< he-dule: 
Oct. I — Bate-sat I.ewiston 

8 — Middlehury at Middle bin \ 
15- Williams at YVilliamstown 
22— W.P.I, at Worcester 
29- Amherst at Piatt I ie-ld 

Nov. 5 — Spr i ngf ie ld at Springfield 

12 Norwich at MA I 
19— Tuft sal MAC. 



BOXING AND WRESTLING 



This wilier it i hoped thai all who 
i hi will devote a lew houta .i we ak to 

1 Mixing or wrestling or both* I WO 
separate- rooms in North College ne 
available ,i-, before in the- winler te-rm. 
I he- schedule <>( instruction calla for 
the trial of a system whereby one of 

three instructors will be present every 
afternoon from three to six o'e i> c k. A 

class on S.iiurcl.i noon i alv> 

i ontc mplatexl. Tl prospect ol 

ral tournament! to be held during 
the season and a possibility ol an 
out -ide contest to top oft. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 8, 1926 






TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, l'uphshtd every 
Wednesday by the students. 



have in 



mind 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



William L. Dole '27 
Ellswohth Baknaru '2« 



hditor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT KDITORS 
Editorial William L. DOU 27 

Athletic. HAKOLI. K. tLAKK £ 

W. Gordon Hun ilk 29 
Campus News BUMKH L- Spkncer "2k 

Faculty & Short COSOTSI Kuw a rw H. Nichols '29 
Intercollegiate Editor Fuancks C. Brucb '27 
Co-Ed News Joskphink Panzica 2H 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charlbs F. Clagg '27 Business Manager 

Liwis H Whitakkk '27 Advertising Manager 

John E. Whitk '27 < m illation Manager 

Douglas W. Loring *2X 

Kdwin A. Wilder 28 

Harold K. Ansei.l "29 

Lawrence A. Carruth 29 

William A. liGAN 29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sing e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for Balling at special rate 
of pUtage provided for In «^n lWS.Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



AIM 

Fresh from the Wesley. m Parley on 
American Coltefe Education, we ted 

obliged to cli-i us* MM 0* tWO aspects ol 

the Parky. We caned b«>i>e tocovtt the 

entire Parley in one hriel essay, there- 
fore we shall probably base our observa- 
tions on it for several weeks. The most 
fundamental MpcctS of this series ol d» 

evasions at Middletows are those related 

to the primary question t on. crning 
American .oUeges: namely, the purpose 
of these institutions.. Dr. William T. 

Foster, one ol the leading investigators 
tod experimenter! >" the held of higher 
education, worded his khw <>i the ideal 

pnrpoee oi American colleges as follows 
•The American college should MOUM 
intellectual ctnic^ity." The OOUegee 
thould instill in their undergraduates an 
enthusiasm to tackle intellectual prob- 
lems and the ability to wrestle with them. 
Obviously, Dr. Foster sec in the Ameri- 
can OOttegef only jiossibilities for the U st 
development along intellectual lines. 

Dr. George A. Coe of Columbia I'niv. 
made- BO single generalization, but rather 
he divided CoBcgM into liberal and pro- 
fessional colleges. He offered as probable- 
aims of colleges a list of three, which he- 
presented from the students' viewpoint. 
Many stuelents want from college a broad- 
er outloe>k on life. They want to have a 
well-rounded educational eaperience so 

that they may meet the world free Irom 
blinders on their eyes. Many others de- 
bire a training that will enable them to 
K ct more fun out of life— not fun in the 
rather superficial Itnse, but enjoyment 
through a broader appreciation of the 
good and beautiful things in the world. 
A few, t)f course, no to college for utili- 
tarian reasons; he called them discipli-s 
of commercialism. 

Dr. Ernest 11. Wilkins, who introduced 
the discussion on athletic-, offered as the 
pnrpoee Of American colleges the follow- 
ing Statement. "Train yon* minds and 
bodies BO that yon will be efficient leaders 
in human socie-ty." Dr. Wilkins see -s much 
value in athletics M well as in intellectual 
training. He would, however, modify 
athletics; and he proposed Dr. Korber's 
OS* vcir rule-, by which no student would 
play on a college team more than one- 
year. This statement on athletic- is 

merety paianthetknlly thrown in here- to 
allay the curiosity of many of our readers. 

His idea ot purpose is really very COttV 
1 -. he nsive, for it is merely a more definite- 
slate nient ol the idea that colleges are to 

u- Men. ' 

Main 'and diverse were the opinions 

forth by undergraduate* and we shall 

uot attempt to present them. All these 

version* prove that the- purpose « »t Ameri- 
can college* i> ill-defined and that it will 
be worth while for educator* and stuelents 

to give a great deal of tbougbl to this 
question. 1 ar be it from us to offer our 
version for we have not definitely decided 

what it would sound like, in fact, we have 

just received the first stimulation to work 

on this problem. Therefore, we shall 

content ourseH with setting forth the 

idea- Of these- three capable- students of 
American colleges, in hope that we may 
stimulate some of the minds who take 
time- to read our column. 



"institution". We 
college dining hall. 

Too little, we believe, has the value of 
a "commons" Im-cii emphasized here. A 
move in the ri«ht direction was t he- 
instituting of the rule which made 

fr.shman attendance at Draper com- 
pulsory. 

Nowhere can a spirit of frienelliness 
and camaraderie- he- lost creel more readily 
than in a grottp of men elining together. 

If we remember aright was it not Stephen 

I.eaeeK-k who recalled the "commons" at 
Oxford as the most striking of its institu- 
tions? Of course the beameel ceilings, the 
oaken tables, the athletic shieltls upon 
the walls — all these we must concede as 
advantages, but even without these, nay, 
without the "curling smoke of main 
pipes" (for smoking is taboo at Draper) 
is there not an opportunity to develop a 
mom wholesome and sincere spirit of 
fellowship and unity by regarding the 
dining hall as our "commons"? 

We are of the opinion that fraternities, 
if they so desired, could have tables to- 
gether with their grand worshipful warden 
at the head much as Niche>las Nickleby 
presided over the stiielent table in the- 

academy <>f Wachferd Squeers, Esq. We 

are sure that it would Ik- allowable to 
have a display of fraternity colors near 
the tables to replace to some extent, the 
shields and spears of Oxford. 

Wit h ■ gfOUp «f upperclassmen at meals, 
mass singing might be encouraged, for 
when doss a man feel more like giving 
vent to the- Scotti in him than directly 

after his evening am*!? The once popular 

piano COUld be brought forth again 10 

furnish accompaniment for the quartets 

we know must be mi""' daring, as it 

Were, i" our student body such as was the 

case two years au<>- 

'I his "commons" idea is one to which 

considerable thought nsigbl be given, for 

any suggestion which has in mind the 

development of college spirit and Inner 

friendships is worthy of some attention 
and if its logic is sound, real examination. 
It is evident that what the dining hall 
MM la. ks is the spirit of friendline>s and 
the- move- to create this atmosphere must 
be f' stereel by upperclassmen, as fresh- 
men are- usually too reticent to take the 
lead in such a movement. There was 
OBCe a time when there were as many 
upperclassmen as freshmen in regular 
attendance at the dining hall. Why is 
the BUmbar gradually decreasing? Is u 
not batnw to have a regular table where 
one can enjoy his meals leisurely than to 
stanel in line in the cafeteria and eat 
hastily at crowded tables? 

If you have any suggestions for m- 
proving the dining hal , why not send 
them in as communications and thereby 
help us in determining the source and in 
remedying the whole rouble. All com 
mimical ions must be signed by the 
student's name may I*' withhelel from 
print if so desired. 

E. L. S. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 8, 1926 



We enjoy Student loruni because we 
learn all the eliverse pronunciations of 

"i-i ". 

P 

bast Friday night was "Colter's Satur- 
day Night." 

"Farmer" Jones has been holding con- 
ference with some of the freshmen to see 
whether he will conform to drill regula- 
tions or change- the army to suit himself. 
p 

We should like to be on the Statistics 
department of the Index to study per- 
sonals. 

Whitaker went to an eight o'clock class 
at nine o'clock last week. The only creelit 
he- got for it was a cut and a half. 

A suggestion has been made that 
Student Forum should lie called Student 

Reform. 

p 

We note with pleasure that Neil 
Robinson, at least, has paid attention to 
Assemblv speakers' introductions. 
p 

Not being satisfied with being the 

"Pride of Boston,' Danny Muihera is 
now endeavoring to become the "Pride 

of Smith." 

P 

Percy Marhn, author of the M Pastic 
Aaw" benevrs that colleges are becoming 

effeminate. We note, in support of this 
idea, tha SI me Aggie men have taken to 

cosmetio, at least at the Abbey. 

— p — 

Not bve-'s Lett COme BOW to 

Adam's House . 

P 

In this sea-on e.f all-st -i fo [ball learns, 
Mir. ly an all-Abbey football learn would 
no be amiss: 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

Since the Parley we- have- a stronger 
conviction than ever that the world con- 
tains many verbose do-nothings. 



It-, Bessie Smith 
1; l.ois Bliss 
l, Barbara South ate 
Ci I )(,t Chapman 
re, Carolyn IX an 
rt, Julia Lawn nee 
rg, Dot Williams 
qb, Mary lngraham 
ihb, Etta Buckler 
Ihb, Elladora Huthstciner 
fb J. May Wiggin 
Water l>oy, Jessie Brown 

P 

"Joe" Forest and "Reel" Mahoney have 
a new position as fire-tenders at the 

Abbey, 

p 

Miss "Chris" was so interesttd in the 
football game at the new theater that she 
missed tWO cars to the "infirmary". 
P 

It is too bad our other professors do 
not follow the precedent established by 
Dean Machmer and invite their respec- 
tive classes to their homes for a little 
social gathering at the end of each course. 

The class of 1029 owes a vote of thanks 
to Carmeta Sargent for the use of her 

soap and towel. 

p 



LEADERS OF AGGIE TEAMS 

(Continued from Pais 1) 
England eleven. "<ierry" graduated 
from Deerfield Academy, and i^ now 
majoring in Pomology, being a memher 
of the fruit-judging team. He has also 
played cla;-s baseball, and has acted as 
class captain. 

Merrill Partenhe inter, the flashy basket- 
ball leader, may appear once more ; t his 
favnrlt* position of guard this winter, 
bast year he paired with Johnny" 
Tempi* '2ti ;t forward, and was second 
only to "Johnny" in scor ng. Although 
he was named as a guard on the thirtl 
team of the All-New England quintet, 
he received greater recognition in his 
sophomore year when, playing at guard 
throughout the season, he was consideied 
worthy of the position of guard on the 
firsts ring All-New England quintet 
named by Spalding's Ouidc. "Part" has 
taken part in 23 varsity victims and 
only five losses. ChsM baseball and 
CI emistry are his minor (?) d versions. 

"Teedy" Crooks, the diminutive, but 
icspected cross-country captain, has also 
been a member of successfu teams, for 
the harriers have dropped only one dual 
meet in the last two seasons. "Teeily" 
has not been an outstanding star, but his 
eaelership anil encouragement of team- 
work hnv* had no small part in the 
victories which the hill-and-dalers have 
gained, for his sport is one which requites 
team-work above all things. "Teedy" 
has also participated in dam basketball 

and baseball on occasions, but spends a 
great deal of his time pouring over hu^s 
in the- Entomology building. 

"Joe" Forest, the aggressive wing on 
the hockey sextet, is one of the few men 
to be elected captain while sophomores. 

lb- prepared for M.A.C it Arlington 

High School, where he also p'aycel 
hockey. "Jen" was a member of the 
cross-COttntry squad last year, and took 
pari in one or two races. He was slightly 
injured and embarrassed ast summer by 
■craping Off some of his hair while diving. 
"Stan" Hall, our relay captain, is an- 
other junior who has distinguished him- 
self. Track, in which he has won his 
letter, has great attractions for him, and 

he has de v e l oped into ■ reputable quarter- 
miler and a broad-jumper of considerable 

promise. In the winter, however, he con- 
fines his activity to the board track. 
Lynn Classical High School boasts of 
having reared this Aggie captain. 



FACULTY NOTES 



The Dairy Department has recently per- 
fected a new ice cream mould. Thi 
mould makes it possible to produce ic 
cream in the college colors and with an 
excellently arranged "M" showing in 
every slice. This mould should prove to 
be very popular for M.A.C. parties where 
the college colors and emblem are desired. 

A large number attended the Faculty 
party which was held Saturday evening 
in the Memorial building. Major and 
Mrs. N. Butler Briscoe had charge of 
the party. Prof, and Mrs. Curry S. 
Hicks and Prof, and Mrs. Marshal 0. 
Lanphear had charge of the refreshmciiis. 
One of the features of the evening was 
a putting contest on the dance floor 
which proved to be too difficult to do 
according to the original plans. It snji 
at first planned to have the competitors 
putt from one end of the floor and try- 
to bring their ball to rest in a circle in 
the middle of the floor. However, no one 
was skillful enough to accomplish this 
feat. The rules were revised therefore 
and the cup which was to be the prize 
was set up as a target. President Lewis 
won the beautiful trophy, which was tin 
plated, with a perfect putt which went 
straight to the cup. 

The refreshment committee set up ■ 
bar which, although reM-mbling the real 
thing, even to a foot rail, was used to 
serve perfectly harmless cider anel dough- 
nuts. Music was furnished by I.anelis' 
Orchestra of Amherst and those that did 
not dance enjoyed themselves in many 
different ways. 



Prof. Alexander Mac Kimmie gave I 
program of selected readings in the Two- 
Year chaticl exercises on Nov. 80. Ik 
read poetry written in the Krcnch- 
Canadian dialect. 



It is evident that if athletics would 
remain as powerful as they are now, 
academics must receive more- emphasis. 
The colleges' reformers are making rapid 
strides towards the protection of the 
intellectual atmosphere in college-. We 
wonder if some of these worshippers of 
the- intellectual man have considered 
those who are highly intellectual but who 
are also human being*. 

* * * 

Subsequent to the arrival of Fall term 

finals, will be the departure of some of 
our neophytes and a few others. The 
, ,nl\ way to play sale- is to Do Your 

Final Studying Early. 



"Kiel" Core's communication in last 

week's Colleton bad DO influence on our 
editorial, for it came to the i flice after 

cur soliloquy had gone to press. It is 

strange that these two articlis appeared 
at the same time. Apropos of this ob- 
servation, several Tufts nun have com- 
mented to us c n the- spirit of the student 

body, especially as displayed by the 

singing'of the Alma Mater after the game-. 



AN M.A.C. "COMMONS"? 
For some- time *e have been harboring 
the feeling that e ''cemvenienee' 1 or "scr- 
v i, ( " on our campus might be encouraged 

and developed into somewhat of an 



ERRATUM 

'The- Collegian wishes to announce with 
apologies that in the personnel of the 
Glee Club as published last week, we 
included the name of Lyman W. Craves. 
This should be Arthur II. < iravc-s. 



"John L." wants to know if Horse-man- 
ship will make a soldier an expert rifle- 
man. 

P 

"Hob" Owen must have had something 
beside- his hash house job on his mind 
when he brought in fourteen mains the 
other noon. 

P 

Signs of winter. The leaves fall, the 

birds go south and Cadge- Evans puts on 

his k ngies. No, they're not red. 

P 

Since WC did not attend the Decent 
production of the Amherst Masquers, We 
quote fiom the Student concerning Dot 
from NeWtonviBe. "The rough strength, 
the vast simplicity characteristic of the 
rustic was cleverly demonstrated. This 
is tribute indeed and Miss Chapman de- 
serves it." 

P 

"Dutch" Barnard anel his reputable 

partner, Prockway, were "overwhelming- 
ly" defeated at an all-night bridge game 

last we-ek. 

Tor the benefit of the few "soreheads," 
the eelitor wishes to announee- that this 
is the last of the Dolc-Amatt combination 
for this year. However, there is another 
year coming. 



COTTER'S SATURDAY NIGHT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
John K. Daniels, who took the part of 
the "cotter" was the outstanding charac- 
ter in the play and portrayed very well 
the gruff, rheumatic, homely, and honest, 
old Scottish peasant. 

The next of the Social Union series will 
be given next Friday, Dec. 3, at seven 
o'clock. "Aggie Revue" will l>e presented. 



AGGIE REVUE NEARLY READY 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
Announcing". This is a novelty act 
consisting of dances and musical num- 
bers, which will undoubtedly be enter- 
taining to say the least. 

The freshman class will stage a series 
of three sketches entitled '"Twas Ever 
Thus," depicting the life of a freshman 
at M.A.C. at three widely different 
periods: 1870, 1926, H>o<>. 'The east of 
these three scenes will neluelc about 
twenty characters. The outstaneling work 
n writing this play'et has lxen done by 
Kric Singleton '30, and is being directed 
by Neil Robinson. 



SHORT COURSE NEWS 

A masepieraele was given by the- girls 
in the S.C.S. society in the Memorial 
building on Friday evening, Dec. S. M in 
Janet Weiks 2 yr. '27, was chairman of 
the committee in charge of the affair. 
Director and Mrs. Rolaml H. Ye-rU-ck, 
Miss Margaret Hamlin, and Mrs. Marie 
B. Marsh were the chaperones. PrisN 
were given to the Ust looking coi 
the best individual costume for 
latlies and men, and the most origii . 
costumed couple. 

Director Roland H. Verbeck addressed 
the Swift River Pomona Grange at 
Greenwich last Thursday afternoon. 



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S. S. HYDE 

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Oculists Prescriptions. KIU«I. Broken UUUi 
accurately rtplscsd 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 




TWELVE GAMES ON HOCKEY 

(Continued from Pafle 1) 

Twenty candidates have already re- 
ported (or shooting practice and con- 
ditioning although no iee has been avail- 



able as yet. Prominent among thoec 
appearing are Captain "Joe" For***, 
"Abie" AbrahaniMin, anel Paul Fiesc. 
three junior letter-men anel "Ducky'' 
Swan, cap tatS of track and a reliable- 
substitute on last year's puck stpiad. 

The schedule announced includes sev- 
eral desirable trips, including sojourns in 
Maine, Vermont, and New York. Five 
of the opponents are also basketball 
foes; namely, West Point, Middle-bury, 
Vermont, New Hami ■bite, and Williams. 
Two meetings w th Amherst College- to 
decide the town champkoship have not 

ye t keen definitely arranged. The sched- 
ule i- as follows: 

Jan. 12— Hates at M.A.C. 

ie)_U.S.M.A. at West' Point 
21 — Union at Schenectady 
22 — Hamilton at Clinton 
2>i — Colby at Waterville 
29 — Bates at I.ewiston 

Feb. *V-Middlebury at Middlebury 

5 — Vermont at Burlington 
1(J — New Hampshire- at M.A.C. 
12— Williams at M.A.C. 



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INTERFRATERMTY LEAGUE 

(Continued from Pufte I) 

to that of laei year. The fourteea coca* 

poting fraternities are ilivieled into t*0 
leaglKSi .»u'l the respective winners in 

each league will decide the championship 
in ,1 poat-eeaeoa game. 

A change has beee made in the eligi- 
Kility requirement! mis year. The only 
men barred Iroin the- learns are iiiiiiiIkis 
i)f the varsity, freshman varsity ami 
Two- Year varsity, anel men of varsitv 
calibre. This change should make coin- 
IHtition much closer and the interest much 
higher. 

A list of men ineligible to play will be 
drawn up by the Board of Athletic*. 

The scliielule- is as feilleiws: 

Jan. 4— K.K. vs I..C.A. 

A.T.G. vs K.K. 
8— Q.T.V. \s I.e. 

S.l'.K. vs D.I'.A. 
6— A.S.P. vs l'.S.K. 

A.T.G. vs A.G.K. 
11— K.K. vs K.S. 

D.I'.A. \s \.1\ 
12- A.S.I'. xsOT.Y. 

S.l'.K. vs K.K. 
l.i — 1..( A. \s l'.S.K. 

A.G.R. \s K.G.P. 
18— K.K. vsT.C. 

S.l'.K. vs K.G.P, 
10— K.S. vs K.C.A. 

\ F. vs K.K. 
L'(i l'.S.K. v-n.r.Y. 

A.C.K. vs D.I'.A. 
85 ASK. x. K.K. 

A I.e.. x> K.G.P. 
30 I.C.Y vsT.C. 
A.G.R. vs K.K. 
27— K.S. vs (J.T.V. 
S.l'.K. vs N.l\ 
I ah. I— I. (A. vs ASK. 
K.C.K. vs K I.. 
2— T.C. vs l'.S.K. 

D.I'.A. vs A.T.G. 

3— K.K. vs Q.T.V. 

A.T.G. vs N.l . 

8— ASK. vs K.S. 

A.C.K. vs N.l . 

9— K.K. vs l'.S.K. 

A.T.G. vs S.l'.K. 
!0— T.C. vs K.S. 

D.I'.A. vs K.C.K. 
lo— g.T.Y. \s I. .(.A. 

K.K. vs D.K.A. 
17— A.S.K. vsT.C. 
K.C.K. VI N.K. 
IK— K.S.K. vs K.S. 
A.C.K. vs S.l'.K. 



Sophomores Lead in 

Interclass Basketball 

Juniors and Freshmen in Tie for 
Second Place. 



The' lust six games oi the intelelass 

basketball schedule have beea played this 
week. The sop h o mo res head the list of 

victors with two games wem and in ne 
leist. The juain is anil Iri'shiiie'ii an- tied 
lor second plan-, each having won two 
anel leist euie. I In- SSttiorS and Two Ye'.irs 

are ai the tail end of the noring list, each 

laving twi loseSS, m> wins, ehalkeel up 

ii.aiiist them. The score : 

..I'd 

. s 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Thurs. 

.1.00. 
«.4ft « in 



Ne, CI, lure* U. din's. I. n 
I'OI I.THY SHOW 



1029... 


... 2 1 


1027. 


1980. . 


. . . 10 


1088, 


1080. . . 


. . . 18 


2 Yr. 


1(127. . . 


.. .10 


1028. 


toss. 


... 24 


2 Yr 






1080 



. .1 

II 

•I 



10 



Beatrice \V. Johnson, ailvisor te> SrOOMUl 
at th« 1 'Diversity of Michigan, has an 
nounced that hereafter co-eds whe> elesire' 

te» attend out-of-ton n football puma must 

have the written eeiiisiiii u| their parents. 

"Without the consent of parents," said 
the announcement, "the University is un- 
willing to take i he- responsibility ol 

women students \\he> ^o to out -of-town 
football games." In a few winds, it 
amounts to this: "Mav 1 football gaming 
go?" "Yes, my CO-cd 'laughter. Hut 
>l.iv away from the guanls anel ends, and 
don't go near the- epiarter." 



Friday 

i on 
S.4A. 8..MI 



Saturday 

.too 

Ml N III 



Kuw. hi hwit'it Morion Ai 
Ilium I ipLuil In "I'OKKK 
PACKS." The fastesl »nd 

fi.imli'M (.in ,■ i oim.iI> a|g 
/llnij with s|»-,-.l inukt'd 
w llh onupi,)' iuiIiiii, liulih- 
llnii wlili humor .uul din-, 
iril l>> ilic in. in who ditve 
you " I 'he I oli. us .uul ki-l- 
ls> I" .mil "Skill II cm l>rom» 
Suit." 
N«W« I reel Coined) 

(Two shows in Nlghi) 

h.4S Hid H..4S 



A mo i her ii nd merrier 
"MKRKY WIDOW" Inhere, 
the iluyenl mid MiuddcNt 
romance ever Hinted. 
"THI VALBT DHKAM." 
A romance of Suy, re, k- 
Irss royulty. luld In u Jewel- 
led sciiliiii of \ ieuii.i .it Its 
iiuiddcsl and 111,-11 lesi A 
■111 gnihi inl sprii.iili< A 

ihrohhlnii iMn of flaming 

tiiiNnionn , blended with dc 
• »ili if til comedy. 
S|,orlll|>hl "SMattSM K.u «•" 
J Reel Coined y 



t.cnc In 11 in-) In "TIIK 
I K. HUM. MARIN! ." The 
I11-.' s. Mi-ii appeal .no ,- ot 
the new world champion, 
I iilliilnii marine, legion- 
naire, i leiin-llvlna. hard- 
hitting hoter . 
News 1 Reel Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMKIY TALKS 

Alumo skates are faster, lighter, ami 
stronger. The only sluminum skate. 

( 01111 in ami see the 111 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

HI AH AMIIKR.HT HANK 



Geolog is ts tell us that we- must think 

not in terms eit days, months 01 yean, 

but in terms of epoc hs, eras or eons. The 
basin of the Mississippi, we are told as 
an example- of the iiiarvi-lenis time COO 
ception, wears away one foot every 7,(100 
yean. Ooo-eio-h girls! Imagine the 
tiiek «ayi a geologist lemr could say 
"forever." 



STATIONERY 

I ( )K 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS 

The ftirls at the Abby approve of our 
choice. We have a bin variety and 
all good paper. 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 
120 Pleasent Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south ofcampiMh 
Telephone 511 



Values Extraordinary 
IN 

Leather and Suede 

Jackets 



1 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Special on 

Shoe Repair 

Soles and Heels $1.50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



James a. Lowell, Bookseller 



GIVE BOOKS- FOR 
CHRISTMAS 

We have all prices to suit all 
Pocket Books. 



Al TOGRAPHED COPIES of 

David Grayson 



BEAUTIFUL CHRISTMAS 
CARDS 

for Mothers and Sweethearts 
an' everyone 



Books priced at 15, 35 & 50c 

for little brothers and sisters 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



That Gift for DAD... 

Brother or friend cannot be b< tight to better advantage than right here. Plenty of fine neckwear, mufflers, gloves, sox or any of the many things that 

a man needs to wear. He will appreciate it if you buy it here. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Druft Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Servic* 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Thr ^etcaAL Star. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

TOILET NEEDS- Soap, Talcum, Toilet Waters, Tooth Brushes 

Combs, Hair Brushes, Face Powders, Compacts, Rouge. 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



NPTTI CTVbM CHOP^ 

L,E \j\y & • omfinmv t u 9 necessity for it, the result of it, is the man who can well afford to 

The man w ho appreciates the vajue ^ economy the "t^ ^ ^ ^ ^.^ 

H. BOLTER HYANNIS 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



CARL 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, PEC. 8, 1926 



COURSE TO BE OFFERED IN 

GOV COURSE MANAGEMENT 

An announcement of an absolutely new 
and unique course in < iolf Course Man- 
agement (or pwiiwhwpurii features the 
1927 catalogue for the Ten Weeks' 
Winter Course. This, course lias created 
considerable interest because of its un- 
usual features. It is a socialized course 
for men engaged in the profession of 
greenskeeping, or members of greens 
committees, and is arranged fin co- 
operation with the New England } .reus 
kee|X'rs* Club. 

Another noticeable change in tin- 
catalogue for the coming year is that the 
Winter Short Course in Dairying will not 
begin until January 17, instead of January 
3, as unusual. This year the courses in 
Dairying will be divided into three groups 
as follows: Course I— Testing, Analyzing 
and Inspecting Dairy Products; Course 
II— Milk Plant and Creamery Operation; 
Course III— Ice Cream Making. E a< h 
course will cover ten days and students 
may enroll for the whole series or for any 
one course. 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in 
prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



the year right at reasonable 



YE AGGIE INN 




MUSICAL CLUBS WILL HAVE 

(Continued from paUe 1) 
season opens next term. The double 
quaf t«t will consist of the following: 
first tenors-Stillman II. Parks '30 and 
Don C. TifTany *30; second tenors- 
Donald H. Campbell *» »*« ,,al,s 

Paumgartner '28; first bases — Max 
Bovarnick '27 and James 11. Cunning- 
ham '2K; and second bases— Joseph L 
Hairston '28 and Edwin E. Marsh '28. 
William E. C.rant '30 will serve as a 
reader. Ernest G. HcVoy '27 and Joseph 
L Hairston '28 will present a little dia- 
logue entitled "Romeo and Juliet". 
Hairston will also render several negro 
spirituals. Lauri Ronka '« will give 
several selections on the banjo and a a 
final feature Hans Baumgartner '28 will 
give an exhibition of Yodling. 



The C.irls' (.lee Club under Miriam H. 
lluss '29 will present a double trio as its 
principal feature. The pi-rsonne of the 
trio are first soprano — Josephine Panzica 
'28 and Margaret P. Donovan 80; second 
soprano— Ruth A. Faulk '29 and Kathryn 
R. Knight '30; and third soprano— 
Prances C. Thompson '28 and Miriam 
H. Huss '29. 

The Musical Club Orchestra, led by 
Leslie R. Smith Jr. '28, as its part of the 
program will render several semi-classical 
selections in addition to its regular pro- 
gram of dance numbers. The members of 
the orchestra are as follows: Theodore A. 
Karwel. '27, John E. White '27, James H. 
Cunningham '28, Walter R. Smith '28, 
Emory D. Burgess '29, Huntington Rutan 
'29, Sidney Vaughn "29, Stuart H. Ward 
'29, and Kermit K. Kingsbury '30. 



DRESS PUMPS 

— AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



You will find an •iceltant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
•quipped with the most up-to-dau Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-St., - Opp. New Theatr* 
We understand your requirements and art pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
AH work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed, 50c 
VINCENT GRANDON1CO. Prop. 



4 DAYS 

BEGINNING 

Wed. Dec. 8th 



Academy of Music- - 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

EVENINGS at 8.15 Saturday Mat. at 2.15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



SING 1 FT HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, M»», 

Our Laundry Flret Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post Office 



44 SNOW STORMS!! 
According to the predictions of the astrono- 
mers we are tohave44»nowstormsthlswlnter 
Remember, we are well supplied with 
RUBBER FOOTWEAR, such as Overshoes, 
Rubbers, Rubber Boots, etc. 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORL 



PAUL HANSELL, Manager 



Harold Owen's Powerful Chinese Melodrama 



W 



PRICES: 50c. 85c. $1.10, Including Tax— Mall OrdersIFilled. 



NEXT WEEK-4 Days, Beginning Wednesday, Dec. 15 

"NUMBER SEVEN" 

A MYSTERY PLAY 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF^ ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

•THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 




WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



A smoking pleasure that never fails 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



HERE is the outsrrnding fact of 
the entire cigarette industry: 
Camels never tire the taste, no mat- 
ter how liberally you smoke them; 
never leave a ctgeretty after-taste. 
Only the choicest tobacccs that 
nature produces, only the finest 
blending ever given a cigarette 
could produce a smoke that never 
fails to please, that always brings 
the utmost in smoking enjoyment. 
Regardless of how often you want 
the comfort of a smoke, of how 
steadily you light one after another, 



Camel*; will never fail you, never 
give you any but the finest thrill of 
smoking pleasure. 

That is why Camel sales, by far 
the largest in the world, keep over- 
whelmingly in the lead. Increasing 
millions are discovering the incom- 
parable Camel quality — smooth- 
ness and mellowness. 

If you want the one and only 
cigarette :h ?t's good to live with 
strenuously from morn to mid- 
night — the cigarette that never 
Ues the taste — Have a Camel! 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



^1 lO"*' 



Overcoats and Mufflers 

- - A wide selection for the cold days ahead - - 

SOUTHWICK BROS. &GAUL1 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



®fo jfflaagarfrttagtta (Enllnjtatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, JAN. 6, 1927 



Number 11 



AGGIE REVUE IS 
GREAT SUCCESS 



\ aried Program Meets With Hearty 
Approval of Undergraduates. 



The annual presentation of the Aggie 
Revue, which was given in Bowker Audi- 
torium, Friday, December 10, exceeded 
the expectations of many by proving to 
be one of the best programs the Roister 
Poister Dramatic Society ever presented. 
The program was presented under the 
general supervision of Neil C. Robinson 
'27, President of the Roister Doisters, 
with Harry C. Nottebaert '27, General 
Manager of the Society, assisting. 

The entertainment represented the 
talent of all four classes. The first feature 
was a play written by Eric Singleton '20, 
entitled, "T'was Ever Thus". The cast 
of characters for this opening number 
was chosen from the freshman class. The 
next play was a one-act comedy, "If Man 
Played Cards as Women Do" by George 
S. Kaufman, which was presented by the 
Roister Doisters. The following numlx-r 
was a -it tie from actual life on the campus 
portraying a band rehearsal under the 
leadership of Walter R. Smith. The pro* 

hi was brought to a close by I scene 
in the broadcasting room of station 
\V\1AC. 

1 lie complete program with the charac- 
M follows: 
1. "T'was Ever Thus" 

/ 'mm- First week of College year. 

Place— Front of Drill Hall. 

Scene 1—1870 

Freshmen 

Henry YY. Jensen 

WalterS. Lake 

Sophomores 

Robert I. Dickey 

Arthur G. D\ It- 
Scene 11—1926 
Freshmen 

Maurice M. Cleveland 

WalterS. Lake 



Joshua. . . 
Jonathan . 

Kknezer . 
Hiram. . . 



Al... 
Bud 



(Continued on Pate 4) 



Expression of 

Appreciation 

Amherst, Dec. 10, 1926. 
Dear President Lewis: 
I On behalf of the Trustees and Li brar 
of the Jones Library, I wish to express 
our deep obligation for, and appreciation 
of, the courageous, able and skillful ser- 
vice of the students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College in saving from de- 
struction books and manuscripts and 
other valuables which we never could 
have replaced. 1 find words insufficient 
to express the value of their work. 

Will you kindly extend to the students 
of your college our heartiest thanks for 
their help in our time of dire need. 
Believe me, please 

Yours and theirs most gratefully, 
JOHN If. TYLER, 

President of Board of 
Trustees, Jones 
Library. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



1'repare to make the coming year the best, 
at .inse i>j nobler work and sweeter rest." 
— Anon. 



Thursday 

7,1,1 1>. m. Two- Year Basketball: Attleboro 

High 
Intirlraternity Basketball: Alpha Sigma 
I'hi vs. Phi Sigma Kappa; Alpha .Gamma 
Kho vs. A.T.G. 
Friday 

7 "" P- in. Social Union: Edwin M. Whitney. 
Reader. 

i i man Basketball: Attleboro High. 
7 ! "> P m. Interclass Hockey: 1927^-3 1929. 
Saturday 

P m. Interclass Hockey: 1928 vs 1930; 
'-"» vs. Two- Year. 

!>■ m. Varsity Basketball: Clark Univ. 
m. Radio Braodcast from WBZ: 
double quartet. 
Sunday 

B. Sunday Chapel: Principal Alfred 
'• -• Stearns, Andover, Mass. 

•UfsJay 

fraternity Basketball: Kolony Klut. v*. 
P" Sigma; Delta Phi Alpha vs. Non- 
•ternity. 
Wednesday 

Hockey: Bates. 
I lubs Concert at Hadley. 
Intfrfraternity Basketball: Alpha Sigma 
1'1'i vs. Q.T.V.; Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. 
I I piilon. 



ELECTIONS TO PHI 
KAPPA PHI ANNOUNCED 



Five Seniors and Two Members of 
Faculty Win Coveted Honor. 



Trior to the Christina* v. nation, the 
fall election of member! of the faculty 
and senior class to Phi Kappa Phi, the 
national honorary fraternity was an- 
nounced. The new menil>ers are as 
follows: Dr. Norman J. Pyle, Mr. 
Arthur P. French, Mary Ingraham, Ralph 
W. Haskins, Clarence H. Parsons, Herman 
E. Pickens, and James B. Reed. 

Dr. Pyle is connected with the Experi- 
ment Station Staff and is Assistant Re- 
search Professor of Avian Pathology. Mr. 
French, who is Instructor in Pomology, 
received his B.Sc. degree in 1921 from 
Ohio State University and his M.Sc. 
degree from M.A.C. in 1923. He MM 
appointed to his present position at the 
College in 1923. 

Mary Ingraham is the only co-ed 
representative to win this most-to-lie- 
desired honor this year. She was gradu- 
ated from Millis High School and then 
attended the Framingham Normal School, 
from which she transferred in the fall of 
1025. She is devoting her time to Agri- 
cultural Education. 

Ralph Haskins, with his inexhaustible 
vocabulary, has won for himself a |H>sitiuti 
on the varsity debating ■qimd every sea- 
I Continued on Pafte 4) 



Hockey Squad Set 



for Initial Game 



Candidates Return Early from 
Vacation to Resume Practice. 



"Red" Hall's hockey squad, faithful to 
the cause, cut short their vacations and 
returned to M.A.C. to resume practice 
on December 30 in an attempt to mould 
together a formidable combination to 
inaugurate the season in a fitting manner 
on Thursday, January 13, when Rates 
comes here to play. 

Three junior letter-men are playing 
regularly on team A during the scrim- 
mages, although in different positions in 
some cases than those they occupied last 
year. Captain Forest will lead his sextet 
figuratively and literally, as he is playing 
at center this year. "Abe" Abrahamson 
and Paul Frese are now demonstrating 
their wares at the defensive posts, a new 
experience for the latter, at least. 

The other places on the team are open 
to argument as yet, although Calanie at 
goal, and Nash, Farwell and Swan as 
wings are outstanding. Cook, Elliot, 
Devine, Kidder, and I-ane, juniors, and 
Kinney, Mills, and Kudquist, sophomores, 
are prominent among the large squad of 
over a score which has been reporting. 

Practice this year should lie as little 
handicapped as King Winter will permit, 
for a space has been cleared off and sur- 
rounded with a low feme on the Campus 
Pond, in addition to the regular rink near 
Alumni Field. Both rinks are provided 
with ample lighting arrangements. 



UNDERGRADUATES TO 
BROADCAST SATURDAY 



Double Quartet Will Give Entertain- 
ment from WBZ, Springfield. 



Beginning next Saturday evening the 
undergraduates of the College will broad- 
cast a short entertainment from Station 
WBZ in Springfield. The first program 
has been arranged by Mr. Hawley and 
will be broadcasted at 7 p. m. Other 
programs are now being planned for 
succeeding weeks. 

The first entertainment will be given 
by the double quartet of the Men's Glee 
Club. This quartet consists of the follow- 
ing: first tenors — Stillman H. Parks '30, 
and Don C. Tiffany '30; second tenors — 
Donald H. Campbell '27, and Hans 
Baumgartner '28; first bass — Max Bovar- 
nick '27, and James H. Cunningham '28; 
and second bass — Lester J. Hairston '28, 
and Edwin E. Marsh '28. 

This enterprise is attracting consider- 
able attention among the alumni inasmuch 
as it has never been attempted before to 
any great extent. Next week "Jakie" 
Haertl and his orchestra will furnish the 
music 



CHANGE MADE IN 
EDITORIAL BOARD 



Three Freshmen Win Places on 
Collegian as Result of Competition. 



As a result of the CaJesglQW competition, 
which was held throughout the fall term, 
the editorial board at its last meeting of 
the term elected three members of the 
freshman (lass to |iositions on the Board. 
The new memliers are John B. HowartI, 
Jr. of Reading, Howard W. Hunter of 
Holyoke, and Eric Singleton of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

These new members will change the 

various departments of the Board but in 

general they will take the places left 

vacant by the three resignations last 

(Continued on Pat* i> 



Poultry Judging Team 

Leaves for Contest 



Aggie to Compete With Teams from 
Five Other States. 



A poultry judging team representing 
M.iss.K husetts, and trained in the I'oiiltry 
Department of the Massa< husetts Agri- 
cultural College i left Amherst yestcrdav 
afternoon for the Annual Intercollegiate 
Poultry Judging Contest to Ik- held at 

Madison Square Gordon, New York 

City, Friday, January 7. The team was 
trained in Poultry Course 80 and is com- 
|Hised only of four year men. Out of a 
dass of nine, the following four men had 
the highest term average, and accordingly 
made the trip: J. E. Cncnaway 'L'7 of 
Springfield, G. E. Bearsc '28 of Sharon, 
C. P. I.adas '28 of Boston, W. J. Tufts 
'28 of Jamaica Plain. 

The Massachusetts team will co mp e t e 
with teams from Connecticut, New York, 
New Jersey, North Carolina, and West 
Virginia. Contributions by the student 
body assisted in refunding a considerable 
portion of the necessary traveling expenses 
of the team. Prof. Luther Banta, .Assist- 
ant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 
coached the team and accompanied it to 
the contest. Headquarters of all teams 
is at the Times Square Hotel. 



JUNIORS AND SOPHS 
TIE FOR FIRST PLACE 



Interclass Basketball Series Ends in 
a Deadlock. Tompkins High Scorer. 



The one point victory of the juniors 
over the sophomores in the concluding 
game of the interclass basket hall scries 
leaves the two classes in a tie for first 
place, each having won three games and 
lost one for an average of .750. The 
seniors and freshmen come next with 
averages of .500, while the Two- Years 
are last, having lost all four of. their 
games. 

The sophomores lead in storing, having 
piled np 70 points. They are followed in 
order by the seniors with 61 points, juniors 
with 59, freshmen with 45 and Two- Years 
with 32. 

The ten individuals having the highest 
■com are Tompkins '29 with 27 points, 
Kane '27 with 24 points, Ellert '30 with 
20 points, McGuirc '28, Moriarity 98 
and Weber '29 with 19 jioints each, 
McKwcn '28 with 14 [Kiints, Coukos *38 
with 13 points, and Paksarian '30 with 9 
jioints. 



NOTED MEN SPEAK AT | ANNUAL A WARD TO 
EXTENSION CONFERENCE I d£$ j ffOOPSTER 



Annual Extension Conference Ad- 
dressed by Mr. Francis, Prof. (Harri- 
son, Mr. Hanson, and many others. 



The annual conference of the Massa 
chusetts Intension Service held at M.A.C 
December 13 Hi, was considered by nianv 
of those who attended the Inst ever held. 
The conference opontd with short wel- 
coming s|H'cchcs by President E. M. lewis, 
John Chandler, President of the Board of 
Trustees; and W. A. Munson, Director of 
the Extension Service. 

At the general meeting on Tucsd.u 
morning the s|icakcr was Mr. D. E. 
irancis of the Deunison Manufacturing 
Company, who explained the organiza- 
tion of successful business campaigns and 
suggested that the MM methods might 
be used to advantage in Extension cam 
paigns. The feature of the general meet 
ing on Wednesday morning was an ad- 
dress by Prof. S. L, Carrison of Amheist 
College on the subject "Not Wh.it to 
Say, But How to Say It," in which he 

declared that the subject matter of .< 
•poach, however Important, is valueles 

unless it is clcaily and intelligently pies 
stilted. On Thursday morning Mr. C. 
II. Hanson of the United Slates Dep.nl 
mint of Agriculture gave an Moat rated 
lecture On the use of pictures for the ill 
struction of extension workers. The « l< » - 
ing address of t he conleiciice was delivered 
by Dinvtor S. B. Haskell of the III 

(husetts Experiment Station. 

I lie outstanding discussion of the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Interclass Hockey 

Schedule Completed 

Rink and Pond will Provide Good 
Facilities for Sport. 



Ski Class Formed 

by Outing Club 

Snowshoe Party and Ski Class Will 
Be Held Saturday. 



The prospect of having lioth the pond 
and the hockey rink in use for hockey this 
winter promises good facilities for the 
interclass hockey games which have been 
arranged to take place this month. The 
schedule includes ten games, the first of 
which will be played Friday evening. All 
four classes and the Two- Years will lie 
represented. 

Freshman hockey practice under coach 
"Phil" Coiling has already started with 
about sixteen candidates on the roll. In 
addition to class games, games are to be 
scheduled with Deerfield Academy and 
Williston Academy. 

The interclass hockey schedule is as 
follows: 

Pate Classes Time 

Jan. 7 1087 vs 1020 7.15 p. m. 

Jan. 8 1028 vs 1030 2.00 p. m. 

1929 vs 2Yr. 
Jan. 14 1928vs2Yr. 7.15 p.m. 

Jan. ID 1930 ys2Yr. 2.00 p. m. 

1927 vs 192K 
Jan. 22 1098 vs 1980 2.00 p. in. 

1927 vs 2Yr. 
Jan. 2K 1027 vs 1980 4.30 p. m. 

Jan. SB 1929 vs 1930 2.00 p.m. 



COOK ELECTED NEXT 
YEAR'S GRID LEADER 



Alumnus Cives Cup in Memory of 
Richards '21. Committee on Award 
to be Chosen. 



Announcement has just Ih-cii made of 
the donation by an anonymous alumnus 
of i cup, known as the Genjfji Henry 
Richards Cup, which is to be presented 
annually to the man who shows the great- 
est improvement in basketball during the 
season. Leadership, s|xirt in.uiship, and 
individual and team play will lie con- 
sideied in making the award. 

The cup is given as a memorial to 
( ■eorge Henry Richards, a Springfield 
boy and a former student at M.A.C., 
who died January 13, 1920, after a short 
illness. 

Richards entered M.A.C. in lOltl but 
left ill January I91N to enlist in the air 
scivice. lie received his dischaigc twelve 
months later and returned to college to 
join the etnas id 1021. Illness oveitook 
him early in January 1020, Septic pp i m a 
ing dcvclo|H-d and he died al his home in 
Springfield six days lad i 

During his college career Richardt 
made an enviable record as a student and 

an athlete, and his cheerful peraonality, 

Wnrmneei of heart, and helping hand 
endeared him to all who knew him. In 

his Ira! var at college he played Ire h 

man basketball, baseball and tennis, and 
was manager of I lie rifle team. \^ an 
upjier classman lie made his letter in 
baseball, and was a member of the 
Vanity basketball team Uhiie leaving 
( ollege to enlist. 

James Rfc hards, a brother, graduated 
from M.A.C. last June. Ih won his 
letter as an outfielder on the .varsity 
baseball team. 

It is planned to have the name of the 
winner inscribed on the cup each year, 
i Continued on Pag* i) 



Clark Opens 

Winter Sports 

Basketball Season Start* Saturday 
With Clark Univ. as Opponent. 



Veteran Junior, Striate Member, and 
Class Captain Picked by the Letter 
Men to Lead the 1927 fcleven. 






The M.A.C. Outing Club will conduct 
a ski class for beginners at the ski slide 
opposite the Abbey next Saturday, Jan. 
8, at 2 p. m. Herbert J. Harris '27 will 
be in charge. All students Interested in 
skiing are invited to be present. 

There will also be a snowshoe party to 
Mount Toby the same afternoon leaving 
on the 12.30 bus from the switch just 
beyond the Abbey. Professor Hicks will 
be in charge. Those without skis or 
snowshocs should not hesitate to go with 
the party. A group may possibly re- 
arranged for those without snowshoes if 
a sufficient number are present. 



Albert C. Cook of Waverly, .< ett» r-nian 
of two years standing, has been chosen to 
lead the 1927 football team. "Al" played 
at end during his sophomore year, but 
was converted into a dc|iendable fullback 
this fall to fill a vacancy there. He is the 
only junior who has won his letter twice. 

Cook is active in other field also, for 
he is a player on the class basketball 
team which has tied for first place in the 
interclass series, and is a candidate for 
the hockey sextet. He has served as ( I 
captain for several terms, and is a member 
of the college Senate. He was recently 
honored by election to the Junior Prom 
Committee. 

Csptiln tied Cook will lead his eleven 
through a difficult schedule, for a ninth 
COtttOSt, an encounter with Howdoin at 
Brunswick, Maine, on September 24, has 
batn added to the schedule, which in- 
cludes games with Bates, Middlebury, 
Williams, W.P.I., Amherst, Springfield, 
Norwich, and Tufts. 



Basketball practice was resumed last 
Saturday, Jan. 1, after a short vacation 
Muring the Christmas recess. The sessions 
for practice will be frequent and strenuous 
this week in pre|iarat ion for the initial 
tilt of the court season which comet on 
Saturday, January H, at M.A.C., Clark 
University furnishing the OppOtitiosv 

A somewhat stable lineup is now 
appearing as team A, alt hough the OC >i- 
(M-t it ion for I he places left vacant by the 
graduation of Temple, Jones, and Smiley, 
the "three bask< teers," finds many likely 
i andidates. 

Captain Merrill II. I'arti nheiiner of 
Greenfiel d has relumed to his foriin i 
position at guard, where he won all- New 
I iigland honors in 10J."», and is demon- 
strating his appreciation with aotfcsahhi 
improvement in play. "Ray" Griffin of 
West field, who played regularly last year, 
has bean shifted to a foiwaid berth Hid 

\t paired with "Rotjr" Keed <»f Green. «1, 
the diminutive flash who tfarred as a 

Ireshm.in two years ago. "Blondie" 
Thomas of Holyoke, the third let ler-maii 
of the group, seems likely to appear at 
(cnler where his height will prove ad- 
vantngeeaa. As a running mate for 
Captain I'artcnheimcr, "l.im" Miirdough 
of Springfield, "Norm" Nash of Abington, 
■fid "Tom" Kane of vYeetfiebj ate all 
having exi-nded trials. 'I In-, year's dab 
should win the sobriquet of "the all- 
Valley Quintet", for Nash is the only 
number of dam A who hails from more 
distant parts. 

In addition to the above named, 
"Squash" Mi T.wcn, and "M.u " \lc< .uire, 
two juniors, and Coukos, ( ox, and 

Webberi sophomores, all players who have 

distinguished themselves on (lass and 
varsity frosh teams, are making the com- 
ix tition keen for team A. 

The opening whistle of Sit onlay's 
game is awaited with eagerness, for 
Dame Rumor hath it that a i. nln.il change 

in the style of play characteristic of 

basketball here at M.A.C. will Ik- attemp- 
ted, although the coaching staff denies 
this, lollowing the Clark clash, a recess 
of eleven days ensues before the Army is 
faced at West Point. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JAN. 6, 1927 



Editorial 

Atlileti. | 
Campus News 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Ofl.c ial newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Collage, PuplMhed iv.ry 
Wednesday by tht- students. 

BOARD Of EDITORS 

William L DoM VI Ulfc*4a-ChW 

Bbmbbi I.. SrsMcas "M I fsnasjng Mfcet 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William L. DoU "87 

MaKOI.I) B. < L*« H 
\V GOKDOM HOMTBi '^'.' 

Howard w. ii« ktss '■'«' 

i si I.. 1*1 OH SS '2S 
hi LSWOBTM Haknaku IB 
JOUM B. HOWASS Jk. '30 

Eric Sikol«tom '■''> 11 

Faculty fc Basel Cmmet BbwabdH.Hkbow* 
Intercollegiate l-.liL.r ¥•»** C. BBUCB J7 

Co-Ed News Josh PHiNK PAW*=* ^ K 

BUBINESS DEPARTMENT 

_ ... ... ..... ••)•} Business lilMIH 

i ^sYt r m« A.lvertisinR Manage. 
K I " WaSS^f Cir.ula.ion Manager 

Dowlas w. LouaflJI 

I i.win A. Wilder 28 

Hakoll) K. Ansei.l 29 

Lawuknck A. CAKKtmi i 29 

William A. Lgan 29 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts C ollegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
bribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

— Fnt.red as second-class matter at the Amherst 
P„», Office A. ce,,te ( l for mailing at special rate 
ofp\» a£pro A vWeYfor in section 1 .03 Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

It is time for our lony delayed summary 
on the athletic discussion at the Wesleyan 
Tarky. Dr. William T. Foster in the 
opening discussion, of which he was the 
leader, presented his ideas on intercol- 
legiate athletics which may l>e summar- 
ized very briefly. "Since interooDcgktC 
athletics interfere with the arousing of 
intellectual curiosity in colleges, abolish 
them." Dean Ernest H. Wilkins of 
Chicago, who led the discussion which 
was devoted entirely to athletics, cast 
aside Dr. Foster's BSSjfjeerJnn with very 
little ado. He, however, proposed some 
very radical measures. Let us quote 
from the summary of his speech as pre- 
sented" in the Wesleyan Anus. 
Collegiate Purpose 
"The meeting opened with an address 
by Dr. Wilkins, urging the adoption of 

m one-year rule. The primary purpose 
a college, he said, is to train the mind 

id body so en lo »**** l '" ,, ' it ' m lenders 

of society. With all the pressing prob- 
lems which confront us today, socict> is 
deapetBtery in need of leadership, and 
looks to the collides to supply its leaders. 
Our duty, therefore, M not to the students. 
but to society through the students; and 
everything in college, includinu inter 

coUefkM football, must be judged by 

that standard, and that standard alone. 

Dr. Wilkins believes that inter.olleui.il. 

football, .is it is now managed. due* inter 

fen with risk ideal. Its efed on the 

individual player is entirely good, but 
the- ratio of actual pla\cr- lo the total 
number of. students is about one in sixty ; 
and its effect on hfty-nine out ol m\i> is 
predominantly bad There are three 
advantage*' relaxation and rest from 

study, development <>f college loyalty, 

antl the provision of a clean and interest 
iny topic of conversation throughout the 
football season. These, however, are 
li^bt in the balance when compared with 
the great disadvantages which inter- 
collegiate football as now managed brings 

with it. 

Football Disadvantages 

The first of these disadvantages is that 
football takes time away from study and 
produces inattention in class. The second, 
which is far more harmful and overshad- 
ows all the others in importance, is the 
distortion in the student's mind of the 
normal scale of values both in college 
and in life as a whole. Football prowess is 
worshipped, and the normal attention 
given to an athlete is greatly increased by 
newspapers, alumni, and the public in 
general. This distortion i ermeates the 
whole college atmosphere, and it results 
in entirely too little stimulation for 
leadership along other lines, particularly 
scholarship. Other evils, which are minor 
in comparison, are drinking at games, 
betting, hiring of athletes, scalping, lax- 
ness in eligibility rules, and too little 
emphasis on athletics for the whole 
College body. 

What to Do? 
The question is, then, what shall we 
do about it? Proposals have been made 
to exclude the public or to abolish gate 
receipts. '1 heM d<> not seem advisable, 
but the best plan which has been pro- 
posed tO far is the so-called Fativer Plan, 
which is that a student shall play vanity 
football only one year during his college 



OOUrat. The advantages of this plan arc: 
it would dec nase the notoriety of indi- 

\ i.lual loot ball stars, and thereby decrease 
the owieiiiphasis on football; it would 
in. i.-.is. the number of men who can 

receive the unrtenttril benefits <»i vanity 
experience; it would make i< possible (or 

students to ad as coaches in the senior 
year, thus making football more ol a 

i student affair, ami giving valuable train 
ing in leadership; it would make it un- 
profitable tO hire athletes; it would in- 
crease the emphasis on iiilra-inuial sports, 
and improve their quality; and it would 
give each man an opportunity tO become 
proficient in other sports which would 
perhapa be of more use tO him in later 
life than football. 

Other similar proposals, such as the 
two-year rule and the reduction in num- 
ber of games played, are a step W the 
right direction, but do not go far enough." 

The Other Side 

We college men must feel that if these 
proposals of the purpose of American 
colleges are the correct ones we are 
falling far short of what is expected of us. 
There were many who would not accept 
these blows to intercollegiate athletics. 
Mr. Winfred B. Holton speaking for the 
alumni of Wesleyan felt that Mr. Wilkins' 
statement of conditions was incorrect 
and he defended the alumni in view of 
recent censure against this group of 
American people. 

Personally we feel like a large number 
of the delegates present. We cannot see 
why such stringent measures need be 
taken. The college man today is ad- 
mittedly not the same as those of ten 
years ago. There are many who come to 
college because it is the fashion or be- 
cause it is a dignified way to escape four 
yean of earning a living. We cannot 
change the style by changing athletics. 
We cannot keep out the lounge lizards 
who have no desire to take part in ath- 
letics by fooling with athletics. The 
athletes are as representative a crowd of 
college men as any other group within 
the colleges. Mr. Holton deplored the 
suggestion made by several exponents of 
radical changes that athletics were taking 
too much of the enthusiasm of people. 
Knthusiasin is an iiuj>ortant factor in 
success in life, so why try to kill en- 
thusiasm. Instead of abandoning athletics 
create cut hiisiasm in *he "intellectual side 
of college". 

This question is one which has received 
much thought from educators. They have 
developed many formulae for checking 
this precocious monster. In this age of 
speed and radicalism we may cx|xct 
something very drastic in the near 
future. This .lis. ussion at Wesleyan is 
only one of many. Therefore, we who are 

most nearly concerned should think the 

matter out and take sides so that our in- 
fluence may be felt where it will do some 
good. 



PERSONALS 



FACULTY NOTES 



M. A. C. 

CONDITION EXAMINATIONS 

January 14 at 1 p. m. 



Considerable discussion is taking place 
in regard to the advisability of having an 
interfraternity hockey league. The new 
rink with adequate lighting arrangement 
should make possible the scheduling of 
more frequent games if snow removal is 
attended to. The doubtful factor is the 
willingness of the fraternities to take 
advantage of the opportunity offered. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 



Now that we have asked everyone if he 
had a good vacation and what he got for 
marks last term, the next question is 
what is everyone going to get for marks 

this term. 

* * * 

When you feel like crabbing about 
some of your low marks remember Prexy's 
watchwords, Tolerance and Understand- 
ing. Some of the Profs may have for- 
gotten them, but the chances are pretty- 
good that they know what they are doing. 

* * * 

Rushing season is on again. Those 
fraternities that were fortunate enough 
to get fifteen or more freshmen should 
not get too excited. 

* * * 

The influence of the co-ed college is 
irresistible. Prof. William P. Brooks, 
former acting president, professor, and 
director of the Experiment Station of 
M.A.C., was married at the age of To, 
while confined tO his bed. 

* * * 

Speaking of marriages, our undergrad- 
uates will soon be all married off. Perhaps 
there really is something in Dr. (ramp- 
ton's phrase, "The co-ed college, the 
breeder of matrimony ." 



Van Hall knows how to pick a good 
exam schedule, for he was through his 
finals on Monday afternoon. 
P 

We vender why Hale Trull did nut 
invite a few of us to accompany him on 
his trip south during the Christinas 

vacation. 

1» 

The engagement of Charlie and Alnieda 
was announced last Monday evening. 

for the convenience of Mrs. Marsh 
we are printing the Abln-y telephone 
numbers: 8770 and B896-M. 

On the evening of December 11, Bob 
Bowie, Tim lloran, Sheik Woodbury and 
I'oodle-hopper Lenoir were apprehended 
by the Amherst police force for the theft 
of a pair of overshoes from (iinsberg's. 
in view of the fact that none of them 
had been incarcerated, previously, they 
were acquitted of the charge. 

P 

We notice that there is more than one 
■pedes of co-ed waiter at the dining hall. 

P 

Among the holiday nuptials was that 
of Audrey Bolles of Amherst and Joe 
Carter. 

The engagement of Frances Swift '30 
and Arnold Lewis of Springfield College- 
has been announced. 

P 

The co-ed football team had an evening 
work-out in front of the Theta Chi house 
last week. 

P 

Much to the disgust of his fraternity 
brothers, Rocky Smith is trying to play 
the piano, the saxe, the trumpet and the 

banjo. 

P 

Suggested song hits: 
Precious* — Ansell 

I'm Lonesome Without My Sweetie- 
Doc Moore 
How Many Times— Edith Bertenshaw 
Me Too— Whitaker 
Baby Face — Isadora Warren 
Bye Bye Blackbird— The Football Team 
Roses Remind Me of You— Clagg 
Who— Kidder 

The Birth of the Blues— Not tebaert 
Some One of these Days— Sam Rice 
Collegiate — Dutch Barnard 
A Round About Way to Heaven— 

Flladora 
I Don't Mind Being All Alone— Kip 

Preston 
Where Did You Gel Those Eyes— Al 

Snyder 
The Two of Us— Harris and Chamberlain 
Who Wouldn't— Lois Bliss 
My Sweetie Went Away — Dawe 

Lucky Day— Fen 

You Need Someone to Love — Cook 

The chapel clock stops, sometimes. 
Here is a suggested motto for Ablnxites: 
Carrv your own timepiece. 
P 

Don Fish ea*28 is in Amherst until the 

first of February, 

Delta Phi "threw" a tea-dance at the 
Woman's Club, the afternoon of Dec. 4. 

The marriage of Joe Hilyard and Miss 
Sally Ryan, on Christmas day, has been 
announced. 

All-Abbey Basketball: 



FACULTY NOTES 

To those doubting parents who have 
sons pledged to, or In-longing to a fra- 
ternity, conies a reassuring word from 
Prol. Frank A. Waugh Ut •'» article 
entitled, "The College Fraternit y", which 
appeared la the December number of 
The American Review of Rniews. Prof. 
Waugh tells some of the inter, sting things 
about the present day fraternity and 
refutes some of the popular iniscoiic. p- 
tions in regard to fraternity life and 
fraternity ideals. In speaking of fra- 
ternitiis as a whole lie says, "If they 
(referring to the worried patents of 
Henry who has pledged to a fraternity) 
really knew the facts they would prob- 
ably find that Henry was actually putting 
himself into the strongest restraints of 
college life and fastening to the most 
powerful forces within his reach for the 
building of sound character." 

Mr. Randell Mighell has been appointed 
to the position of Investigator in the 
department of Farm Management in the 
Experiment Station. Mr. Mighell is a 
graduate of the Iowa State College and 
during the past year has been a research 
assistant in the detriment of Farm 
Management at the University of Minne- 
sota, from which place he received his 
master's degree. He is to do research 
work under the provision of the Purnell 
Act. 



AJbagra 1 

Physics 96 

Math 50 



3 p. m. 



MB B 

PL B 

MB D 

114 
114 
114 

m 



Eng 1 
Lug 25 
Lug '>.'{ 
P S 80 

January 15 at 8 a. m. 

Chem 1 ft 4 G SB 

Zool26 FBI) 

Pom 50 WH A 

Chem 75, 80 & 01 GL 

10 a. m. 

Trench 1 ft 4 FH F 

Spanish 50 FH C 

( ier 1 & 25 1 13 

Agriculture 1 102 

Eng 28 114 



MILITARY NOTES 

As a result of the firing during the 
fall term and also the firing in the match 
against W.P.I. , the following named men 
have been chosen for the Rifle Team: 

Ames, Rhoades, Ferguson, McKittrick, 
Mills, Chadwick, Rees, Day, Bdsoa, 
Zielinski. 

It is requested that they report to 
Sergeant Cronk as soon as possible for 
instructions in the coming matches. 

There are still five vacancies on the 
team. Any member of the unit desiring 
a try-out should see Sergeant Cronk. 



Mr. Rollin H- Barrett has been ap- 
pointed Assistant Professor of Farm 
Management to take the place made 
vacant by the resignation of Professor 
Max F. Abell on September 1. 

Mr. Barrett graduated from the Conn. 
Agricultural College in the class of 1918 
and spent about a year in County Agent 
work. He then went to the Randolph 
Agricultural School at Randolph, Vt., to 
teach agriculture but at the end of the 
first year was made principal. He held 
the position as principal for five years 
and then resigned to take up graduate 
work at Cornell University in Farm 
Management and Agricultural Educa- 
tion. He has completed the work for his 
Master's Degree. He began his work at 
M.A.C. on November 1. Mr. Barrett is 
married and will live on Pelham Road. 



The following is the results of the Prone 
Rifle Match fired against Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute Rifle Team during the 
week ending December 18. 

Score— W. P. 1. 492 
M.A. C. 492 
Individual score for M.A.C.: 



McKittrick 


.100 


Chadwick 


. 99 


Ames . 


. 99 


Rees . 


. 97 


Mills 


. 97 


Rhoades . 


. 96 


Zielinski . 


. 93 


Day . 


. 92 


Ferguson . 


. 90 


Edson 


. 89 


Total. 


952 



If . . . 

rf . . • 
c . 

lg . . . 
rg . 

Manager 
Cheer leader 



McKay 

Lynch 

McCabe 

Steinbugler 

Leonard 

Morey 

Bruce 



On the evening of December 18 the 
management of Aggie Inn gave a banquet 
to employees and guests. 
P 

H. F. Thompson '05 is the editor of 
the American Produce Grower, a new 
magazine in the field of market gardening. 
The December issue contains articles by 
A. G. Bouquet, a former graduate student 
here, and E. F. Guba of the Field Station 
at Waltham. 

There has just been published by the 
Orange Judd Publishing Company of 
New York City the third edition of Prof. 
W'augh's Landscape Gardening. The first 
edition of this book was published 27 years 
ago. It has now been thoroughly revised, 
considerable matter added, and com- 
pletely re-illustrated. 



NOTED MEN SPEAK 

(Continued from Page 1) 
county agents' program centered about 
the control of tuberculosis and attendant 
problems in the improvement of livestock. 
The friendly relations and the desire for 
co-ojH-ration between the Intension Ser- 
vice and the State Department of Animal 
Industry were emphasized by Frank B. 
(u minings, head of the department. Dr. 
( >. K. Baker of Washington noted a marked 
increase in the efficiency of farm oper- 
ations, attributing much of it to extension 
work. The county agents as a group de- 
dared the meetings and discussions very 
helpful in suggesting ways for carrying 
the work to the people of the various 

counties. 

Home Economics Extension Workers 
heard speeches by several of the out 
standing leaders, including Miss Lucille 
Brewer of Cornell University; Dr. Mary 
Swart z Rose, Professor of Nutrition at 
Columbia University; Miss Leonore Mc- 
Cormack of the Pictorial Renew Com- 
panv; Mrs. Helen Fish of the Metropoli- 
tan Art Museum; Miss Marion Butters, 
State Home Demonstration Leader from 
New Jersey, and Miss Flora Thurston, 
Nutrition Specialist from Cornell Univ 



CHANGE MADE IN EDITORIAL 

(Continued from Page 1) 
term. The changes in the departments 
were made by William L. Dole, Editor- 
in-chief, at a special conference with the 
three junior members. In accordance 
with the policy adopted by the Board 
last spring, the position of Managing 
Editor will continue to be held by the 
juniors on the Board for the winter term. 
Ernest L. Spencer will act in this office 
the first five issues of the term and 
Ellsworth Barnard for the remainder of 

the term. 

Under the new arrangement, Harold E. 
Clark will continue as head of the Athletic 
department and will be assisted by W. 
Cordon Hunter and Howard W. Hunter. 
The Campus department will be headed 
by Ernest Spencer, with Ellsworth Bar- 
nard, John B. Howard, and Eric Single- 
ton assisting. The other departments are 
Faculty and Short Courses— Edward II. 
Nichols, Intercollegiate News— Frances 
C. Brute, and Co-ed News— Josephine 
Panzica. 



There are still several places 
Board which have not been filled and 
therefore, the Board has decdied to hold 
another competition during the winter 
term. This competition will be limited 
to members of the sophomore class in 
as much as there are only two mcitilK-rs 
of the class of '29 on the Board at pretest. 
All sophomores who are interested should 
get in touch with William L. Dole or any 
member of the Board as soon as posabk. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

$ PLEASANT STREET, (up ©•• ■»*»« 

Oculists Prescriptions Fitted. Broken Isms* 
accurately replaced 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable, makes 




An Income 
Reservoir 

Like the reservoir which as- 
sures constant water supply- 
the Life Income Plan assures 
a constant income. 
You put surplus earnings m 
it now, and later when earning 
power declines with age. y° u 
draw out $ 1 00 monthly for Ide- 
$100 monthly whenever dis- 
abled meanwhile. $10,000 to 
your family if you do not live- 
It's a real income reservoir. 
Write for descriptive booklet. 

Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield W* 
Greenfield, Maes. 



Hand and Hand with Quality 1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JAN. 6, 1927 



I 



MICKEY - FREEMAN 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



INTERCOLLEGIAIIS 
A riding and polo i lull has Urn formed 
at Bowofa and temporal*) officers elected. 
Ilu club numbers about twenty five nun 
at present. 



- HA P PY NEW YEA R - 

Start the New Year with a pair of... 

"BOSTON1ANS" 

and you will be happy the entire year. 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



The expansion of earollmenl ai Dan 

mouth has so far eKCSeded any similar 

expansion ol the fraternities on the cam- 
pus that the need of ■ club ior bob- 
fraternity nun has been sorel) felt. This 
yeai thai need has, in a measure been 
net and fused. A temporary structure, 

equipped with rani and pool tables, and 

fitted up with reading and lounging rooms 
has been built, A letter has been seal to 

all the non-frattrnity alumni of D.ni 

mouth asking for tluir financial rapport 
and aid in making the chtb a permanent 

institution. 



A new system of study is in vogue at 
P rin ce t on this year. Seniors who show 
exceptional ability are allowed to take 
three courses of study rather than four. 
The extra time will be spent in individual 
study under the guidance of a professor. 
This system, it is hoped, will give the 
student a foundation for a method of 
study which will aid him in meeting 
problems of life. 



Students in the (icrnian universities 
take hut one exam in four years, concin- 
1 1 .11 1- exclusively in one field of knowledge, 
and are allowed no cuts. 



In looking over a college rule liook of 
many years ago, the students at Alfred 
University, Alfred, N.Y., found that at 
one time in the history of the university 
that a man walking will a girl student 
on the campus was required to keep 
three feet away from his companion at 
all times. In order to comply with this 
regulation it is said that on these walks 
the couple carried a yardstick with theta 
and one walked at either end. 



Silk dealers will lost considerable busi- 
ness this fall if other colleges follow the 
rules and regulations for their freshmen 

set down by the Washington Square 

College sophomores of New York Univer- 
sity. Silk so\ are taboo. White cotton 

hose have been de cr eed by the Upper 

classmen for the incoming 1980 < la-^. 
Besides this iinpCrioUS order it has Im-cii 
ordained that freshmen cannot slop to 
carry on a conversation with any girl 
while within one block radius of the 
University buildings at Washington 

Square. It now remains to be seen 
whether the frosh will l«- able to bootleg 
silk BOX and dates. 



ANNUAL AW\RI> TO NMT 

(U>ni in ucil from BSsgS ■ 

The cup itsell will probabl) !«• kept in 
the Memorial Building. The committee 
on award ol the cup will l« named by 
President Lewis and will probabl) in- 
clude Professor lliiks, General Manager 
oi Athletics; Dean Machmer, Chairman 
ol the Joint Committee on Intercollegiate 
Athletics; Harold M. (.ore, Head Coach; 

and Ralph Slediiian ol Sprnighcld, Chair 

man of the Alumni Advisor) Baaketball 
Committee. 

TWO- VI \R BASKETBALL 

l In prospects i<>i a s ucc e s s f ul season 

for the Two Near basketball train seem 

rather dubious because coach "Red" Ball 

has found it BSCSSSarj tO build up an 
almost entirely new aggregation. Only 
two letter men, Leslie C. Holland of 

llolyoki, ami Philip H. Parsons of Man- 
chester, are available from hist year's 
■quad. AI>out twenty-live candidates 

reported lor tin- lirst practice, and of this 
number, some four or five have had pre- 
vious experience. Considering the bach of 

practiie and previous cx|>erienie the team 
is shaping up very well. Among the ran 
didates are I.. Holland, I*. Parsons, and 
II. Stewart. 

The schedule which has thus far been 
arranged is as follows: 

Jan. ft— Attieboro High at M.A.C. 

18 — Turners Falls High at M.A.C. 

22— Vermont Academy at M.A.C. 
Feb, l-llolyoke High at M.A.C. 

12— Prury High at North Adams 

17 — Clark School of Hanover, N.I I. 
at MAC. 

25 — Sin red Heart High of Holyoke 
at M.A.C. 
Mar. 5— Pittsfield High at M.A.C. 

You will ftnd an wicellani 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-dsls Coodysau 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at Hi Amlty-St., • Opp. New Theatre 

ll'» utt'lrr ■ inn./ your rtquirtmtnts and art prt- 

pared to mtet your ntidt. 

All work guaranteed Shots ikitud and dytd. 60< 

VINCENT GRANOONIGO, Prop. 



1 own Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

Jan. *-<> 

MAI IM I 

.1.00. 

ONK snow 
'at NIGHT 

7. tO 



Friday 
M| 

4.4.V .H..t0 



Saturday 

Ml 
s.45 Ml 



SPECI \l ! mm <;i m.i 

Till MIDNIGHT M V 
wlih Laura La Plant a I'm 
O'MaUey. You nittal m-»> 
• in sparallal hullvi of |aw 
alt i h«* Imperial Btisslaa 
ballot fur «ln. h an entire 
royal opera imtrlor sras 

I. inli die luSlsrtOUS nltilit 

iKe of ta* isj/asi capital al 
pro-war Kuropo the sploa- 

dor ~iii rou ml I lift those of 

nobis birth untold wealth 
untl limitless, absoln tonom ■ 

er. Anil iliroutfh ll nil an a 
liolilen thfsnd of love 
News, I allies, und a Hal 
Ho. i. h Comed) "Got Them 
Vouna". PRICES: 

Mai Child. Hi. AiIu.in Sac 
Keen's*. Hlnor .t.v hat. -We 



Muy Murray in "VAI I- N - 
CIA". A itlitieriiiit romance 
of Sou In of the " Merry Wid- 
ow' type 

Sportflghl mid a Smith 
Cbm'y "Smith's I anil lord". 



Mo,. I (.111, nil III "THE 

BUCK tROOKID". II,- said 
he'd i in ufl his lioss's ears. 
So while the old man hired 
a hodyAuaril, llool copped 
his dauiihtei . und < leaned 
up luzy S ranch. A red- 
blooded yurn of the cattle 
country by Peter II. kyne. 
News und a 2 reel Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Corona Four Remington Portable Type- 
writers, tiio.iMi. Used Corona Three 
Typewriters, 123.00 and HS.OO. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



FRAMES 



for th 



ose 



Christmas Photographs 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house souili of campua. 
Telephone 511 



Values Extraordinary 

IN 

Leather and Suede 
Jackets 



I 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Special on 

Shoe Repair 

Soles and Heels $1.50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 



AMHERST, MASS. 



OPEN FOR BUSINESS-opposite Town Hall 

Orders Filled Promptly. 

The Latest Books. 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



HAPPY NEW YEAR... 

START RIGHT BY BUYING YOUR CLOTHES FROM US. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

2%« *ll&tta&JL Storm 



SING LEE H ** PLAUNPRY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Maai 

Our Laundry First CIbm 

Our P»llcy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 

PRICES. . ._- m- 

Opposite Pout Office 



Welcome Back! 
Axgi<- Men I We nrsj rendv t<» neap you 

U I the n< n yc;ir ri^ht with a 
Pnl of OXFORDS 

JOHN FOTOS 

SKI.F-SF.RVIGK MM STORK 



AMHERST. MASS. ^ ______»_^ — — — — — ^— — - — —— — ^— — — — ^— 

We are now established and open for business at new location, opposite Town Hall. 
New shipments arriving dai, ^ ARL H BOLTER «™™ s 



EXETER 



AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JAN. 6, 1927 



ACGII REVUE IS GMEAT sicciss 

i Continued from Page I) 

K,.,l Kcrinii K. Kingsbury 

Qlondy St unit II. Loiter 

Ruth Lucy A. Grunwakll 

Betty. • • ■• 1< mini At wood 

Sophomori 

Hob Robert I. Di< key 

J ;„, ( u-orge 1 1 • Barney 

Lunatic ,;,ii: S ln g iet nsi 

Nurse Gertrude M.iylott 

Scan* III— 1950 

RtniiiaUi Theodore Marcus 

|> t . rc . y Allen J. Warren 

1 lubert Kendall B. Crane 

Clarence Kalph E. < -unn 

Ruth Monica Q. Cotter 

L uc y Ann E. Hinchcy 

2. Prof. Homeyer introduces his 
"dummy" Goldberg. 

Frank F. Homeyer '28 
Maxwell H. Coldbcrg '28 

3. "Don" Savage and his Whatsit, 

Donald C. Savage '27 
Edwin E. Marsh *28 
William E. Grant '30, Reader. 



NOTEBOOKS PAPER, STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

prices. BANNERS, PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 

YE AGGIE INN = 



4. 



5. "If Men Flayed Cards as Women 

Do." 

jol,,, Maxwell 11. Goldberg *9§ 

Bob Frank I". Honey* '28 

George Leonard W. Morrison '2«t 

Marc Donald H. Campbell '27 

6. Musical Skit. 

Myer Lynsky '29 

James W. Lollard, Two-Year 

7. Blatant Band Rehearsal. 

Walter R. Smith, Leader 

8. "45 Musical Minutes from 

Station WMAC." 
"Dutch" Ansell and Company- 
Art ists: 
"Midge" Huss '29 "Jane" Patterson *29 
"Dutch" Ansell '29 "Don" Tiffany '30 

Orchestra: 
"Moon" Mullen '27 "Ev" Pyle '27 



"Hill" Draper 98 "GeioV Goldberg '27 

"Mop" (anney 90 "Dutchie" Schmidt 

Announcer: 

"Jakie" Haertl '27 



"V i f iv/| • 4 DAYS 

Academy or Music— beginning 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. Wed. Jan. 5th 

EVENINGS at 8.15 Saturday Mat. at 2.15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 

PAUL HANSELL, Manager .__ 

"Little Miss Bluebeard " 

A COMEDY IN THREE ACTS 
By Avery Hopwood, Directed by Charles Warburton 
PRICES: 50c. 85c. $1.10, Including Tax-Mail Orders Filled._ 



ELECTIONS TO PHI KAPPA PHI 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
son since his freshman year. Besides 
participating in class debating, he is a 
member of the Roister Doisters. He was 
graduated from Greenfield High School 
and is now majoring in Agricultural 
Education. He is a member of the Q.T.V. 
fraternity. 

Clarence Parsons has been very active 
in academic activities as well as a star 
scholar. He is the leader of the Men's 
Glee Club and a member of both the 
Stock Judging team and the Dairy Pro- 
ducts Judging team. He is majoring in 
Animal Husbandry and a member of the 
Q.T.V. fraternity. He attended Amherst 



High School before entering MAC. 

Herman Pickens is also one of our star 
debaters, having participated in varsity 
debates since his freshman year. He was 
M editor on the Collegian for two years 
until he went into business as a sign 
painter. He is a graduate of Stoneham 
High School and is now devoting his 
attention to Floriculture. He is a member 
of the Kappa C.amma Phi fraternity and 
has won the distinction of being cla»s 
grind and class orator. 

James Reed, when not working out in 
the Chem Lab, devotes his energy to 
managing the College Store. Waltham 
High School claims him as a graduate. 
He is a member of the Theta Chi fra- 
ternity. 



The Collegian has made New Year's 
resolutions, too. Try and find them! 



DRESS PUMPS 

— AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



NEXT WEEK-4 Days, Beginning Wednesday, Jan. 12 

"CHARLEY'S AUNT" 

A Farce that has a world wide reputation 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to fto and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshment, and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALLJklNPS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

•THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 





WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 




The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



yerytnings 
going to be 
all right 

THAT'S the way P. A. talks to you in the bowl 
of a pipe. This great national gloom-chaser 
stabs the darkest clouds with a ray of sunshine. 
Buy a tidy red tin of Prince Albert today and 
see. Tamp a load of this friendly tobacco into 
your jimmy-pipe and light up. 

Cool as a sub-cellar. Sweet as the breath of 
fresh-cut violets. Fragrant in the tin and fra- 
grant as you smoke it. Never a tongue-bite or 
a throat-parch. So mild you can hit it up from 
sun-up to sun-down, yet with a body that satisfies 
completely. 

There's more philosophy in a pipe-load of 
P. A. than in the average Doctor's thesis. No 
matter what brand you are smoking now, you 
don't know how much your jimmy-pipe can 
mean to you until you pack it with good old 
Prince Albert. Get started now. 

PRINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



© 1926, R. I. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



P. A. it told everywhere m 
tidy red lint, pound and half- 
pound lin humidort, end 
pound eryiial-glati humidort 
with tponge-moittener top. 
And alwayt with every bit 
of bite and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert procett. 




Starting the New Year Right 

1. an easv matter if you learn to solve your Clothing and Haberdashery problems here. 

y SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



AGAIN 

—we have — 

Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



(Slip Hagaaritttflpttfl fflnUpmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12, 1927 



Number Tl 



Eighty-Three Students 

Win Scholastic Honors 

Junicrs Lead in First Group but Seniors Mead the Remaining 

Groups 



1 lie <-la» ot 1928 again dsmonet rated 
it- acholastM supremacy last term, l>y 
placing tivf of its numbers in the highest 
oj the honor group* which were recently 

ii out In 111 the Dean's Office. Two 

member! of 'In- .lass of 102H also ob- 
tained an avenge Ot over '.*<>. None of 

tin- sriiior dan won plaits in the first 
group, I"" the} r ed ee med themaelvea bj 
, ding l>oth the other group*. 

\ comparison of, the honor list of the 
first term of this year with that of the 

spring term of la-t Ve*T ahowi sonic 

interesting facta. The total number of 

ii, mn t- in the three groupa was practically 
the aame for both terms: H2 the s |>rinn 

arm ami v o the fall term. The daaa <>t 
1927 also made a nearly identical show 
in^. the numbera being 31 for last apring, 
.iikI :<2 for the fall term. The claaaea ol 
- and 1929, however, exactly reversed 
their records, lo the apring term 38 mem- 
ben of the former class ami 28 ol the 
latter won plan- on the honor list, while 
i in lists just given out have 28 "t the 
former and 23 ol the latter. This would 
...in to be further evidence for the pre- 
vailing opinion that the sophomore year 
i» ilu- most difficult . 
The complete honor list follows: 

Group I 'to— too 
Misa Batchelder '28, II. E. Clark '28, 
v. II. Goldberg "28, C. P. Ladaa '28, 
Mist Parrish '29, III Ro] Miss 

nbugier '29. 

Group II S3— on 
Miaa Allen "28, R. C. An,..- '27. Mi-- 
\\.i\ "29; I.. Barnard 28, < .. I.. I'. 

! . I. Boden '27, Mas Bovarnick "27, 

D. II. Campbell '-'7, Miaa Chapn "29, 

Mi-- Church 29, G. \\. Dutton '29, \Y. 

G. I ■'-on '29, s J, Ewer '88, K. < . 

J7. I.. J. Haertl "27. R. \\ . Has- 

27 A ' . Hodaoa "28, W. \V. Kenne- 

'28, K. (.. Laubenatein '28, F. K. 

Mullen "27, I-.. 1.. Murdough '-'7, Mias 

I'.ui/ir.t "28, II I . Pfckene '27, Misa 

Planting 28 C. P. Preston "28, E, J. 

I'yl, _■;, ii. II. Kiihi.r '27, W. E. South- 

'. '29, J. M. Wiggin "27. 

(iroup III Ml— XS 
I.. L Allen '28, Jack Amatt '28, < .. G. 
Ain-tein '_'7. Mi-- Barttetl '29, Mi- 
ni '28, Hyman Herman '28, C. I.. 
. '29, K. W. Burrell -'7. L. A. Car- 
ruth "29, C 0. Cartwright "27, R. M. 

27, K. A. C. .iin.ll _'7. \V. B. Cook 
'.'7. Misa Cooke "28, Misa Davison 'J7, 
I. II. Forest 'J.s. P. F. 1 ■• m 28, J I 

naway '27, 1 >. C. Hanson '27, \\ . G. 
Hun • 29, Misa Infcraham '27, C. k. 

a n *29, Leroj (ones "29, J. V 
Kimball '28, k. A. Kreinbaum '2'.'. Misa 

28, J. A. Mali.y '27. \\ . K. Mc- 

Coiiii.iiift) on Pafce 4> 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



more preurtgoTthy, and nothing 

I dearly iiuii.nu a greet uiui MM 

r.e." 
— ( / 



Wfdne>il;i> 
■ ■ 
Alpha Sigma Pad ira. Q.T.V. 

■ Phi Epafloa ra. Cappai Epaflon. 

• h,l, , mi, e'tt ;.t Il,iillf> . 
Ihursday 

ty ho, k,-> : II. 
!:,:<'Mi,.tiTnity basketball: 

Lambda CM Alpha \>. Phi Sigma kaj>i>a. 
Alpha Gamma Rbo \>. Kappa Gamma I'lu 
hiday 

i:i. Iiiuii h\M BOI kc\ . 

^-. Two-Ymtr. 

I i tub concert at Ffc m e ou 

ib uoBcetl at < aahman. 
wurdas 

:• m. IiUiT,.';.i-> In» k.-\ : 
-. Two-Vear. 1927 
P. m Radio btoai in WBZ: 

1 "'l D'Or Band. 
Sunday 

a. m. Sunday Ctiapel: Dean Cliark- 
R. Broun. Vale rnivcr-ity ; 

; in. Social fnion: Bo-ton Chamber 
Muak < Uit,. 
Tuesday 

: ball : Turnci - i 
Iternity ba-k,-tball: 

mj Khib ra. l 

Phi Epailon \ - K.,; . I'bi 

:> in. M A.C. Radio Poraan from WBZ: 
-or Kratid-i-n. 
d Club romert at GnUt&tii. 
"linesday 

•■ baasstssB: WeU Paaan at Weal 

nt. 

haeher: West Point at West Point. 



Thirteen Pledged 
by Fraternities 

Q.T.V, and kappa Sigma lload List 
With Four Each. 



At chapel last Mondaj morning, which 
\\,t- the second opportunity of the \>.^ 

tor fraternity pledging, thirteen atudeflts, 
mo-t of them freshmen, aignihed tluir 
intention of joining some one of the 
various fraternities, As was the case 
with the fall rushing season, a smaller 
percentage ol nun wen pledged than is 
usually the case. 

The list of pledges ia as follows: 

Q. T. V.— Timothy J. ll..i.,n '29, A. 
Richards Daniels "80, Robert I Dicke) 
'30, Wilfred G. Purdj '30. 

kappa Sigma — George A. Mann- '30, 
Carl V Bergan '30, Charles B. Cos '30, 
Kenneth \\ . Hunt '30. 

Sigma Phi ipsUoal Edward I Haley 
'30, Thomas I h therington '30, 

Lambda Chi Alpha — W.ih.i S. Lake 
'30. 

Alpha GaflUM Rhi; — Reuben II. 
('.ill '30. 

kappa Ipsilon — Hany < . Kemp) '30, 
Prof. < Irani B, v n- 



Quartet Entertains Radio 
Audience from W.B.Z. 

Coq D'Or Band V\ill Provide Mwsit 
Next Saturday l.u-mng. 

II,. i,r-t id a aeries ol entertainment! 
which will be given to th< radio audienci 
bj the uii'ii i ^.i idu .1. t ol tin- ( oil 
was pn -cnt<<l last Saturday evening from 
Station WBZ in Springfield. These en 
!• n linnic nis during the coming week* 
will con-is! of characteristic college pro- 

grams. The tir-t ., t was given l>\ 

the double quartet of the Men'- <,!.. 
(lull. The aelex nous were a repertoire ol 
colli • onga consisting <■! "Aggie M> 
, ' . "Tin y 're on the I ield", "Baj 
Stati Loyal Sons Are \\, ". and in.uiy 
others. The l.»-t number on the program 
was the "Alma Mater". 

1 1,, object ol these brief college i>ro- 
grama is to -how the wholesome life of 
1 1 1 1 xis- to those younger boya .. n< 1 
yjrls, to fathers ami mothers who wonil.i 
oiwhat college hi< consists besides books 
and professors. The program next Satm 
<la> evening at 7.1fi o'clock will be given 
by the Coq D'Or Band consisting of 
Edwin "Jakie" Haertl, Lottfa "GokUe" 
Goldberg, Francn "Moon" Mullen. Ev- 
erett "Ev" Pyle, William "Bill" Draper, 
George "Moo'' Canney, and Phillip 
"Dutchie" Schmidt. 



SKI CLASS DRAWS 
SMALL GATHERING 



len Students Take Advantage of 
Instruction in Sport. 



The ski class, under the direction of 
Herbert J. Hani- 27, met last Saturday 
afternoon for the first time, an.l about 
ten students, including three co-eds, were 

given instruction in the thrilling s|>ort. 
Practice waa held on the hill to the 

north of the orchard, the hill being of a 
nature consistent with the skill of the 

participants. Conditions for practice 

were not of the best -ince the -now waa 
covered with a hard crust that made 
falling dang. roti-. Harris had his stu- 
dents HSC but one ski at first in order to 
teach them balance, arid then taught 
them bow to fall and how to relax. Natur- 
ally, since this was but the first lesson 
there waa considerable billing but OO OOt 

auffercd any injury beyond a few scratches. 

Some of the fellows tried the "stem turn" 
and the "-now plow'' with a fair_amotint 
of aucceaa. 
It is to be hoped that more atodenta 

will take advantage of this opportunity 
of learning the art of ski-ing. The class 
will meet each Saturday at 2 p. m. 



Special Summer Courses 
Offered in Horticulture 



New Courses to be (Jiven in the 
Division of Horticulture. 



The Division of Horticulture will ton 

duct a apecial summer school of horticul- 
ture, lands, ape gardening and forestry in 
July and August of the coming siiinni.r, 
following the schedule ol the regular 
summer session. The term period Ml -*i\ 
weeks in length anil the instruction will 
be given by the regular members ol tin- 
College staff, assisted by out side lecturers. 

The courses propoasd an- .is follows: 

PpmeUgy Modern Orchard Practice, 
F. c. Se.ii>; Advanced Systematic Pom- 
ology, A. P, Preach, 

Ilurtu ultunil Mtinutiutun-s General 
Course, W. \\ . Chenoweth. 

Landscape Gardening Garden Design, 
I rank A. Waugh; Surveying .ind Mapp- 
ing, A. K. Harrison; Plant Materials, c. 
II. rhompson. 

.l-'lorii ultitr, Garden Flowers and Bed- 
ding Plants, C, I.. Thayer, 

Vegetable Gard*n4ttg Types and Vari 
■ ii.-. ( '.rant It. Sny.lcr. 

l-i'rrstry Forest Ecology, I.. R, Grose 

and Specialists from the Noi t lua-tei n 

I , i. -i E xp eri m e n t Station. 

Related Science* Plant Phyaiology, 
Orton I., (lark; General Taxonomy En 
tomolog) . I lenry I . Fei nald. 

Special work in various department a 
may be arranged t<>r qualified graduate 

-I lldi nl-. 

< ..iitiiiiieti in, mas - 

COLLEGE BOASTS 
NEW SKATING RINK 



All Valley Quintet 

Wins First Contest 

Aggie lloopsters Hand Clark I niv. 20-10 Defeat in the 

Opening Gsmt of Season 



Competition in 
Military Opens 

Silk (iuidon for Best Troop Will be 
Glvaa at Ciimmi'iut'iiii'iii. 



Campus Pond Will Provide- for Rec- 
reational Skating in tlu- Future. 



Another diversion has be.-n added !•> 
the ii-t oi ihoe available t<> the campua 
K>,i,., , . .!- well -i- t" those enjoyed bj 
the mot, in tin- form nf .> 

new rink and akating aurfao on the old 

;-u- Pond. M< ceforth, ib. young 
couple seeking exerciai "i a cold wintei 

ing can enjoj a skating part] in tb. 

don ol a crowd ol akatera gliding 
about under a bright light < a*t over ib. 

lamili.tr, yet soiuewbat changed pond. 

With tin MA < . Outing < 'tub now en 
established organisation, and with a 
toboggan and ski slide as well as a -k.ii 
ing rink so near at band, Aggie stud.nt- 
have a line chance to enjoy odd momenta 
ol the winter Mason. I his added oppor- 

iimiiv for exercise and amusement is of 
noteworthy benefit to the whole Cola 
Ample laiiliti.s are now available for 

inter, la-s hockey and piihb. k.iting, 

while the varattj hockey aqund is doublj 
insured ■ -uit., Me akating surfai .-, the old 

hockey rink near Alumni I ield still being 

maintained. The onlj restriction regard- 
ing the use of the new surface is that all 
hock inial and informal, must 

be confined to the area surrounded by the 

battle boards, the outer |K»rtion- being 
reserved for public and private -kating. 

"Ibis new servi. .• i- made possible 
through the activitie- of I'role— or lli.k- 

and funds furnished by the Athlets 

■ i iation and the College. The sur- 
face will Ik- kept clear as long a- finances 
will iM-rmit, depending somewhat on the 
number and variety of storms King 
Winter -end-. The Atlileii. Association 
is furnishing the light-, the ice-planer, 
and the labor nect saary for -now removal, 

while the College paya for electricity con 
sunn d. 
Nearly the entire ikhhI has been cleared 

off, and movable battle boards which will 

permit scraping have been set up to form 

a rink in the center, surrounded by a 
broad expanse of ice. The whole plant is 
illuminated by flood lights until ten 
o . lock every evening. I be i.e planer 
purchased by the Athletic department 
last year guarantees as good a surface US 
i- possible on an outdoor rink. 

Those appreciative of the beautiful in 

nature need not be disturbed at the 
erection of the poles which support the 
lights, for these will be taken down and 
the lights returned to the football held 
in the spring. The old rink, something 
of an cvesore St other seasons, will still 

be uhi\. since it is imperative thai the 

varsity have a place which can easily Ik- 
hooded in an emergency. 



I In- annual competition to determine 

the best troop in the corps of cadets, lor 

which a silk guidon will In- awarded at 
Com m e n ce me nt, will ba bekf ibis veai 
under a slight K different basis of mark 

ing. This competition, which takes in 

ever) phase of military tactica taught 
here, is, as usual, open t<> all the troopa 

in the corps, 

The grades of the troops will be divided 
into foui separate groups. The hist 

group, which will be marked on I basts 

ol 35%, concerna the military efficient) 
rating <>t each troop, in Im.iIi mounted 
and dismounted drill. The aecond group 
deals with ih. average <>i u rma mark in 

in militar) of the individual on nil ,. i - ol 
the Hoop and will also |„- marked "ii a 

basis., i :!.",•,. Tb, n.xt two divuiona have 

i rating Of l"> each I In In-t .,( tin , 
is based ii|k>ii tin resulta ol the uidooi 

< uiiiiiiiitii ,,n r.,|t ( - .< 

Attleboro High Defeated 
by Two-Year ^nintet I 6 7 

Holland Stars by Scoring Twelve 
Points for Winn 



I be Two *> , ■■: quintet I \ i< 

torious b> a lo . a on from it i fit st out 
-id, game ol tin aeaaon, played against 
Vttleboro High in the Dull II. ill bat 
Thursday evening. The garni waa marked 
l>> hard piav ing and . I,,-,- guarding. 

Ih.- Ural half w..s,i displa) of air-tight 

d. I. n--e woik on the part ol both (..inl- 
and i he hall ended wil b ttv G 2 in 
favor of the Two-Yeai In t be la -i half, 
however, the Attleboro defense weakened 

and the Two \r,-i loiw.nd- slipped 

through time aftet time for counters 

The game ruled with the Attleboio 
backboard in constant <l.in s ,i and l Ii,- 

high school playert de peratel) attempt 
ing long shots from in ir midllooi when 
in (Missc.ssion ol i h<- ball. 
Holland, the Two- Yeai center, was the 

outstanding pla\,i ,,l l In evening, -e 

counting for twelve ol the Two Ysi 

sixt.-i ii points, a/hile Worral played a 

giMid game lor Attlsboro. 

The summer) : 

AltlrlH>r<> 

r it I P 

1 II 2 1 i-Il.T.IX 

I) 1-oeW.lK 

.", II] l-m-t.lu 

,, I, ii I' 

i ii a u<.uji.it 

' lllK-II.lt 

I-I'l'l 



Two- Ve.ir 

H. I 



Pai --ii .It 

(llvill.lt 
llolli.ixl., 

i haaaJa 

Itllltil -lU 



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II o o 

1 1 
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7 g II 1'. a l 7 

An, -I'-ni. Time S-miauti 



CLUBS GIVE FIRST 
CONCERT TONIGHT 

Musical Clubs Will Open Season at 
lladley Ibis Evening. 

Although tb. Musical Cluba have al 
ready given one c on ce rt , that at the 
Veterans' Hospital in Leeds, the concert 
scheduled for Wednesday night, Jan. 12, 
is their first public appearance. This 
conc ert is to be given in the Town Hall 
at lladley under the auspices of the senior 
i lass of Hopkins Academy. The lladley 
r.-eital has had a place on the Musical 
Club's schedule for a number of yt 
and the people, who attend, have come 

to expect not a little. 

It is expe.ted thai .ilxait thirty-eight 
nun will make the trip, including thirty 

in the C4ee Club and eight in the orchi i 

tra. Ibis year two busses have Im-.h 
procured for the .onvenien.e of I lie 
Clubs in making their trips, and these 
will be Used for the first time. As usual, 

the concert will be followed by a dance, 
the music for which will be furnished by 

the (I ub orchestra. 



"Kid" ( ..He's all \ allev < lllinlet, the 

new combination which represent! M \ 

C. mi the basketball coiiit. inaugurated 

the season Willi a L*(l to 1(1 \nloi\ over 

Clark University in a game played al 
the 1'iill Hall last Saturda) evening, 

I he contest was distinguished l,n the 

aggressive attitude dieplayed b) both 
teams, and for the creditable defense 

shown bv llie \gales The v isil.n - main 

i, mud themselves on even terms in ii„- 

first half, whii h was ended with a knotted 
s. OK >>l 7 all, but could not coniintic t he 

pace in t be final period. 
"Ray" Griffin opened the si.uine, for 

Aggie with (wo pretty baskets which 

followed lightning like cuts through the 
Clark defense. Kane of Clark then coun- 
tered with a double de. ker alt.-i some 
.level passing by (he visitois. Captain 
I'.u 1. nil. inici nulled the tables again b\ 

intercepting an attempted pass and work- 
ing the ball down lllldel the net, when- he 

tallied. Free tries b) "Blondie" rhoraaa 
and Spadola esiai.lish.il ih. acorc ii 
Hen i In invaoV 1 1 gave ih< ii l» H . x- 

Inbiiioti .,1 pa-sing and ■crapping "I llie 
game, and a in. < ahof liom I he sj.|. I,\ 
Ciano, followed at length l>\ another by 
Shan, tb. in from a iin'l,'. ,,t legl and aims, 

tied ih, , ,,n in i l„ i,,,, ih< gun ounded. 

I he \gatei i nil. b.u k w ub a nisli in 
(he next session, however, and i.in up 
ih.ii total lo 2(1 i h, mis before (he Clark 
in. ..ml. I garnet a tingle point. "RoK" 
i ' ■ -I dropped in one from the fifu - n 
i. mii mark, and not long iftei ward added 
two [Miint s more when In. attempted ilei- 
tis was bounced back into hia expectant 

bands. 

In the meantime, "Blondie" Thomas 
added mother free try, and "Part" 

It be spiieu I hrOUgtl til< hoop liom 

a difficult angh b.u, ub tb.- basket, 

I in n tl,< \^n i , liter added another 

. I. spin- ib.- .an ,i oi in opponent who 

draped n in. I i,r In. - by 

I'. :il, ub, inn i and I aplet.-d I lie 

I 

< iptain Sh mahan man t^ .1 to tally 
on, i more, and a foul ahot was also added 
aa substitutes rushed into th itesl foi 

the .losing s, , onda. 

( . I | » t III! Nil. ill ill ill .-. , I.I I.I ll, I 

for ( lark, but M ■ \ rjpe boasted no 
Con i in u «'tl .hi I'nite I, 

DEBATING TEAM BEGINS 
WINTER PREPARATIONS 

Six Candidates Competing for \ at ant 
I'l.ue on Team. 

I he M..\.( . .1. bating team In- > onv 
menced ita work in preparation ha the 
.. i i. - oi debates which take place annually 
during the wintei term, and then is every 
»n to expei I ' hit thi w - - >>i last 
year, v. ben onl) i be i ontest with the 
famous li.it. s i,. ii. i w.i lost, win i„- 
repeated. 

Ilu- outlook i- particularly hopeful in 
that onl) one m. ■hiIm-i oi the 1928 team, 

namely Idiot I'. Dodge, w.i- lost through 
graduation. llie otlni two, lb riiian I 

Pickens "37 and Kalph W. Hasfrina VT, 
\ eterana of thr. . \ «-.! , ,i -, debet - 
iiu. an -till on hand, and ahould con- 
tribute much lo Hie - o| the te.im. 

For llie remaining position tl ,,x 

other . .nidid.iie- Herbert |. II. mis '27, 

,i member of the varsity debating team 

three yean ago; Maxwell II. Goldberg 
of Burnham Declamation Contest 

and Roister Doister lame; Roman \ 
Kreienbaum, Charles I. WaMtden, and 
Robert Simcovitz, all ol 'j'.t, and Carl \ 
Bergan '30. The candidates are being 

< (MM li'd SS in |irev ioits ;. , u b) I' 
Walter I. Inn,, ol , he l.nglish depart- 
liietit. 

Tin- schedule of debates in which the 
M.A.4 team will participate this arinter 

i incomplete, although arrange- 
ments have Imiii m.ule for a trip to 

Vermont next March, when the Univ. of 

Vermont will lie nut on March .5 and 
Middl.biiry on Match I. ( >t her debates 
which are [lending final arrangements 
with the I niv. of Maine, Colby, and 

George Washington College. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12, 1927 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Pupliahad every 
Wednesday by the student*. 



into this arena than to <lo so on skis or 

on aajuasfinsa Beekkt, then wa few 

more wholesome and healthful artivities 
ill. ill these. 



HOARD OF 
William L. Dole 77 

ERMBSI 1- M'lM IK "~* 



:ditors 

l'diior-in-Chief 
M:in:i|[iiiK Kditor 



Stearns Gives Valuable 

Address on Charity 



DEPARTMENT EDITOR* 

William L. DOU '27 

liAKiii.D E. Clam "•■ 

\V GOKOOM HiMKK '2<J 

Howako W. ill mi k at) 

KleNKSI I.. Sl'KNCKK II 

Kllswokih Haknakd '2K 

j., us B. HowAM) Jk- "30 

I-'.ku Sim. I Ki"N '30 

Faculty & Shoii CMfMl Ki>waki. II. Nkiiois L».i 

Inter, ollegiate Kditor Joskpiiine 1'anzk a Si 

Personal* Edltoi VusMtmC, tWCl 77 



Editorial 
Athleii' s 

Campus NtWI 



PERSONALS 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ThauiksK (iA«.(i'27 Business Maii.iuf'i 

LEw-s 11 Wi.iiAKKR '27 Aclve.us.nu Manage; 

John B W.iiie 77 < in uU.tii.n Manager 

DOUOVAI W. Loking 7K 

Edwin a. Wn dbb 7« 

IlAHOI.II K. AN'hll. '30 
UW«KN(>: A. < AKKt 111 29 

William A. Ii.an 2(1 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as *e< oml-cla^ matter at the Amherst 
Post oftVe. Accepted {of mailing at apeclad tmtc 
Of postaRe provided for in section . 1 108, , Act ol IX- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



FOR M. A. C. 
Fighting lor aay cause make* Ae caoea 

more vital to US. Athlete- have ■ Feeling 
of responsibility which is initiated l»y the 
fact that their MMOBH or failure will 

influence the standi*! of the or gaai aa Ho a 
«hkh they lepreaeat. hfaay who have 

fought tor M.A.C in the athletic world 

have developed beautiful and activating 

college spirit. There arc many wonderful 
stories of soldiers on the battlefield whoat 

patriotism was ".really intensified when 
patriotism was the motivating force. 
Some say that we have cause and effect 

inverted; but the fad remains thai there 

is a rdation. Some deny the lads of our 
illustrations, hut thee* ix-ople are prosaic 

pragmatisti lor whom w. have no word 

except wait and you will have some of 

life's beauty thrust open you. 

Hut let us fO on. We saw last term a 

remarkable revival of college spirit on 

our campus. Let us not slaclen. We can 

I heep in '•» fight and keep up our 

>irit. The athletes, of course. CM keep 

ibefar banner before them Md ti^ht for it. 
Hut they need not inonoiiolizc the OppOT 
tunities. We CM all *WI to put M.AC. 

high in the scholastic world, thus inject 
iiiR a bit of romance into M evcrylax 

task. Hut perhaps equally frnportaat t«> 

the COHeg* is sninethinn which .ilumni and 
students can share, although the greater 
burden rests on the undergraduate s. All 
MAC men and women can -linw to the 
world that we are real men, liioael men, 
big nun. We can hide when in disgrace 

but let us be proud to show ourselves at 

all times. We can strive to impress our 
neighlxH-s among the town-folk of Amherst 
and ill others whom we chance to meet. 
Most of us have other reasons for being 
decorous when decorum is Ix-st and 
studious when study is accessary ami 
hilarious when hilarity is discreet. Let us 
add another reason. Let us be all that 
is great and good for the honor of M.A.C 
Let no man find just cause to (ensure us 
and let any men reaped us as individuals j 



Principal Alfred L. Steams, of Phillip* 

Academy, ^ndover, Mass., ■ peaking in 

chapel last Sunday morning, gave a some- 
what new conception of charity. Princi- 
pal Steam* pointed OUl thai We ordinarily 
come to think of charily as the giving of 
things that are of no use to us, to people 
who can use them, something that in- 
volves no sacrifice OH our part but yet 
brings to us a certain amount of credit. 
While this may be the commonly accepted 
version of charity, the speaker declared 
that this is entirely different from the 

charity of Christ and the Bible. 

Instead Of being ■ mere superficial 
reeling assumed at times, charity should 
be a deep, wett-rOOted feeling, shaping 
thought and action, and life itself. It is 
closely akin to, if not identical with, love. 

Because he possessed this virtue, Christ 
was enabled to Wxik into a person'* charac- 
ter and recogniae conceit, hypocracy, and 

other negative qualities, and it was 
through the MM means that he was 
enabled tO reCOgniae true worth in |xoplc. 
He proved this by ch<x>sing his Disciples 
from the rough men, perceiving that 
under their rough exterior there were 

many excellent q u a liti es. 

The speaker pointed out that |xople 

are very frequently judged wrongly in 

college. The students fail to take into 
consideration a ixrson's heredity and 
environment, and, not having Christ's 
conception of charity, can do immeas- 
urable harm to the school-mate whom 
they do not understand. We should 
show that feeling of tolerance and love 
towards our fellows and should judge not. 
that we be not judged. That will lead to 
the ideal charity. 



Doc Gndsby 'JH. who has beta i" 

Florida for some time, has now gone to 
Miami to join the large landscape dele- 
gation there which largely centers around 
the park department of which J. Cerry 
Curtis ex'07, is superintendent. 
P 



FACULTY NOTES 



i 



ALL-VALLEY OUINTIT WiNS 
(Continued from Page I) 

outstanding lights, the teamwork ol the 
quintal being its greatest asset. I he 
distribution of points gained illustrates 
the fad thai M.A.C. has not a restricted 
attack built around one or two stars, but 
a well -balanced combination which pos- 
sesses an extremely varied offensive. 
The summary: 



Horace B l O Ck w ay ** new sweater has 
gained tor him another nickname- 
Stripes. The sweater would be more 
useful if it had a packet on both sides. 
P 

!•;. J. Rowan '2t> visited the college 
during the Christmas vacation. Me is 
engaged in landscatx- gardening work 
with the Larr Nurseries of W \ oinissing. 

Pennsylvania. 

P 

Midge Muss claims that she doesn't 
need a radio when her room-mate is 

around. 

P 

Bttddy l'rost "21 has gone to Man- 
hattan, Kansas, to fill a temporary en- 
gagement as instructor in bltdscaps 

gardening. 

J» 

Apparently Red Marsh likes the Herk- 

shires for he spent his Christmas in 

I'ittslielel instead of in New York. 

K. H. Simmons, s.r-c ial 12."), spent the 
last few weeks as instructor in landsca|x- 
gardening at the Ohio State diversity, 
filling the position left vacant by I'rof. 
W. R. Sears '16, who has gone to the 
Lrosl School of Domestic Architecture 
and Landscape Architecture in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

P 

We know of a certain boy who bought 
a radio when the girl friend was campused. 

p 

Bono Tufts and Al Cook are looking to 
the future. They have entered into I 
partnership and are engaged now in the 
selling of socks, shoes, shirts, etc.. among 
the students. 

P 



It was made known last week that 
Director Samuel T. Dana of the North- 
eastern forestry Station is to Ik- made 
dean of I school Of forestry at the I'niv. 
Of Michigan provided that the legislature 
appropriates the MCOSSary money to start 
such a school. Director Dana has been 

head of the Northeastern Station for three- 
years ami tluring this time has been very 
active both in his district which includes 
the New England states and New York, 
as well as a leader in forestry work 
throughout the country. 

Mr. Dana is a graduate of the Yale 
School of Forestry, and was at e.iie- time 
the- forest commissioner in the State ol 
Maine. He attended the world forestry 
congress at RotM last spring as a dele- 
gate from this country and he is also 
president of the Ame-rican Forestry 
Association. 

Prof. Frank C. Moore is at present 
giving a series of lectures before the 

members of the staff of the Experiment 

Station on some of the concepts and 
processes *>f statistical method. The 

lecture* cover such topics as the develop- 
ment of probable error, least sepiares, 
fitting t)f curves to statistical data ami 
the theory of correlation. 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

kegistiation in the regular ten weeks 
Winter School is practically complete and 
the numlx-r of students in the course i| 
thirty. The full enrolment will not |„. 
reached, however, until the opening of 
the ten-day courses in Dairying on Jan 
17. The total registration last year arai 
sixty-five and it is not ex p e ct ed that thi* 
figure will tpiite be- equalled this yen 
The registration cards show that Poultry 
is perhaps the most popular course- and 
the course in Coif Course Management 
is also among the more popular COUrsu, 

in point of numbers. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12, 1927 



A reception was held last Saturday 
evening in the Memorial Building for tin 
inSHllllir* Of the Winter School. The re- 
ception was in charge of a committee 
from the Two- Year C OUCSS and t he pat roii>, 
and patronesses were Director and Mr*. 
Roland H. Verlx-ck and I'rof and 'Mr,. 
Crant H. Snyder. After a general intro- 
duction those present enjoyed general 
dancing and refreshments. 



Prof. John G. Archibald, who is Assist- 
ant Research Professor of Chemist ry, 
attended the annual meeting ol t he- 
American Society of Animal Production 
held at Chicago in December. Profe-ss,,, 
Archibald read a paper on the Mineral 
Requirements «>l Dairy Stock. This 
paper is to be published in the prexee-d- 
ings of the society. 

Dr. Charles A. frten attended the 
meetings <»f the American Society for the 
Advancement of Science and gave a talk 

.in his expe ri ence* before a Chemistry 

seminar at these meetings. 



The Kolony Klub has plans nearly 
made- for a sleigh ride in the near future 
and the Two-Year Freshmen are also 
e-oiiside-ring the possibility of having a 
sleigh ride. 



Director Koland H. \ erlieck and Prof. 
Paul W. VTstS attended the meetings of 
the Cnion Agricultural Society held at 
Worcester last week. 



Freshmen Give Second 

Defeat to Attleboro 



MeSS. Aftilie 



K, cl.lt 
l, nihil, if 
Tlionia -.1 
Murcloiiuli.li; 

NaahJs 



H 

2 
• 

2 



ii 



F 1'. 
1 ."> 
I 



I'artcnlieiiiK-r.rg 2 



Clark Univ. 

B. 

SiK, imali.lK <l 

ru.he-r.ru ,J 

2 li Spailola.rg 

(1 (I Mattson.lg 

(iaiio.c 1 2 

Hranclinlmru.c 11 1 1 

Kane.rf I 2 

1', uison.rf «> 

Bha— mm M 2 4 



I P. 

u ci 

() 

I 1 

II II 



II 



Totak s i 20 

Ki-t.-n-i- Johnson, linn 



Totak 4 2 l(> 

20-miiiute Ii.iHi- 



anel as Aggie Men. 



WINTER SPORTS 

We- are- glad to etc the- growing interest 
in winter spirts at M.A.C. Last Satur- 
day, besides Prof. Hicks' mOWShce hike- 
to Mount Toby and llerl.ic- Harris's ski 
class, there were several sttowshoe- parties 

md lorne rid-jormg. The militarv de- 
portment baa two horses sharp shod and 
,i harness made for ski-joring. In spite- 
of thee rust there wascnough tobogganing 
to create- a long list ol invalids. 

M.A.C. has very ge>oel potentialities as 

a college for winter sport-, except for I he 

l.ict that there are 00 nearby bills ol *i/e 

end iteepneSS, Prof. Hicks and others 

have tired hard to XTOUK interest in this 

, [cuae tor vv inter with only fair results. 

I his veil, however, the- Outing Clttb has 

,de its influence bit aire adv. It is for 

good name ol this organization and 

fc r the prestige of M.A.t . thai w* make 

our plea. Let us all get out some- ol these 
I rilliant day* and sec for ourselves what 
fun there is in winter sports. Perhaps. 

t, o, we can eppeasi the raving* <>f the 
enemies <»i intercollegiate athletic* by 

rWUtg that physical exercise can be 
mineral in spite of the present athletic 

program, Those of us who would enjoy 

aesthetic ssped of the winter land- 

n , ,m find no better way to get out 



SPECIAL SUMMER COURSES 

(Continued from Page I) 

< (the-r courses will be available from t he- 
program of the Colle-ge Summer School. 

Registration will lx- open to both 

graduate students and to qualified under- 
graduates. This Opportunity ought to be 
of s|hc ial service to two groups of under- 
graduates, viz. first, those Juniors who 
are well up with their work and have- 
■one extra credits .end who. by attending 
the simime-r term, will lx- able to finish 
their resident work in March, 1928, thus 
omitting the spring term. Second, the 
summer se hexil will help those near- 
J union who are lx-hind with their credits 
and who are short for graduation in 1928. 
By taking extra ere-dits at the- summer 
school, they may lx- enabled to make up 
their deficiencies and graduate with their 
class. 

It is also a well-recognized fact that 



Notice! Help is needed by one Kappa 
Sig man. lie fears he is l>eing rushed. 

p 

The (.ids' Ole-e Club will give its first 

concert in Cuehaaan, Friday night. 

— p — 

A group of YAV.C.A. mem b er* me*> 

nadeel the Old laches' Home in North 
Aniherst, the other evening. 

P 

Amanda Helle Honora Chlex- l.etitia 
Patricia Sylvester is the latest addition 
to the Abbey list; it suffices to My that 
it is not another flivver. 

P 

The Men's (.lee (bib double tpjartet 
Mag at WRZ last Saturday night. The- 
Coq D'Or Hand will play next Saturday. 
Perhaps the radio audience will realize 
that we have more than Professors of 
Agriculture here at M.A.C. 

P 

Although Dick (.rover is forced to 
visit the infirmary and to walk with a 
cane, we notice- that he was able to 
participate at the last Friday Night 
dance-. 

P 

Hill Dole cut short his Christmas 
vacation by three days to have a date 
with our Puss. 

P 



The Meat and Meat Prcxlucts course, 
offered for the- first time this year by the 
Animal and Dairy Husbandry depart ment 
for Ixith four-year and two-year students, 
i-, proving to lx- very lxipular. The en- 
rolment in both sections is considerably 
larger than the de-part ment had antici- 

pated 

Professor Julius II. FrandeeO gave a 
talk Tuesday. January II. before the 
Hampden Women's Club Federation in 
Holyoke on |x-nding elairy le-gislation. 



The Freshman basketball team de- 
feated Attleboro High in the Drill Hall 
last Friday evening in a fast, overtime- 
game. The game ended in a l.Vpoint tie. 
but in the three-minute overtime ix-riod 
the neophytes scored two baskets to one 
by their opponents, to win by a score of 
lit- 17. 

The playing was fast and hard and the- 
re-stilt was in doubt up to the last second 
The first half ended with the Frosh in 
the lead ti-."), but in the second half Attic 
lx>ro came back and epiickly piled up a 
six-|X)int lead. In the last lew moment- 
of regular playing time the Freshnieii 
were ahead 15-14 but Attlelx.ro seor ' 
on a foul shejt, thus making necenmrj 
overtime |x-riejd. 

Attleboro owe«l most of its seoring to 
Worral's gotxl eye, most of his ten imhih- 
lK-ing scored on stxctacular long she - 
Fllcrt was high scorer for the 1 reshnie-n 

while Burbank and Mann played well iii 

the defense- |x>sitions. The summary: 



MILITARY NOTES 

The College Hand needs more men. 
Those who can play a band instrument 
ot any sort and who would like to try 
playing with the band, are asked to get 
in touch with the military office-. Those- 
who are- not connected with the unit are 
also welcomed. 



Freshmen 
B. 



Stanis'.ki.lf 

Kllert.rf 

Kni-e-lanil.il 

("rane.c 

Mann.lb 

I'arksaii.ui.tli 

Hurl.ankrb 



Attleboro 

B. 1- I' 



1 


II 

o n >> 
2 » 



il 

1 I 



A Frost .rl, 

7 1. oew.lt) 
o Wri«lil.»> 
Kop i- 
Wonal.rf 
l ftven.ll 
D'tforrl.l! 



I 

1 1 3 

ii ii u 

n g J 

1 2 1" 

1 ii -' 

ci S I 



There is a plan on foot to have- a rifle- 
range constructed in the- basement of the 

Abigail Adams house. 



Ski-joring behind a flivver proved such 
good sixirt that Dutch Ansell and Ed 
Nicho s went alx.ut twenty-five miles 
on their skiis last Saturelay. 



There have just arrived at the cavalry 
stable six new horses. 'This brings t lie- 
total number of horses up to sixty-six. 
which is all that the- stable can hold. 



Totals 7 •-. 10 TotaU 'i •■ 1' 

Score at half time-M \ t • \-,i, bo) 

Referee -Ball. Time -Vminuf periods 

thre-e minutes overtime. 



-/"-. 



f-' 



midsummer is the most advantageous 

time for the study e.f many brandies oi 

horticulture. Much excellent field work 
can Ik- clone then, which is impossible 
during the winter. The student, who is 

anxious therefore t<> ge-t the full benefit 

of the- facilities at M.A.C. might well 
take- this summer work whether he- needs 
the credits or not. 

Other colleges throughout the country 
are being informed of these- plans and it 

is ex pe c te d that then- will be some 
attendance from outside the regular circle 

of MAC students. 



Once- more we repeat it. If yt>u know a 
good personal don't hide it. Send it to 
tin- Collegian 



by the Exchange mail or 

}, ave it at the- Ce.llege Store. All con 
iributiotis art- "gratefully" accepted. 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

The- Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, honorary 
fraternity, had the great pleasure of a 
visit from the President General of the 
National Society, Dr. L. IL Panunel of 
Iowa State College-, Saturday, January S. 
Dr. Pammel arrived at noon and was 

entertained at an informal luncheon at 

Draper Hall, being met by alx.ut forty 

m em b e rs of the local society. He was 

introduced by Professor Frank A. W.mgli. 
President of the local chapter, and made 
a pleasing address on the work "I the 
Society. He s|H-nt the- afternoon in visit- 
ing the College ground! and buildings. 
anel at four o'clock gave a Second address 

to the seminar of the Botany department, 

Dr. Pammel himself being a nationally 
famous figure in the field of Rotany. His 
v isit was made interesting and pleasant by 
the fad that several member* of t he- 
College faculty arc his former students 
and others his long time- frie-nds. Among 

his former students are Professor and 

Mis. J. S. I'randsc-n and Dr. J. S. Cham- 
berlain. 



The Freshman schedule lor this term 
will be as follows: on Mondays and 
Wednesdays lectures, and 00 Friday* 
drill work in the drill hall. The band 
will practice on drill days unless other 
wise specified. 



■ — ^ 



/^r- 



.' 













COMPETITION IN MILITARY 

(Continued from Pafte 1 1 
shooting practice, whereas, the Second has 
to do with the total point* for outside- 
riding. 

In regard to the indoor shooting t he- 
points will be allotcd as follows-, for each 

member of the troop firing in all four 

positions — 8 |x>ints; for each man averag- 
ing 863 points; for each man averaging 

82 ■"• 1« >ints; and for each man ave-rag- 
ingSS, HI points. 

Under this basis of marking cadets 
may receive additional |x)ints for their 
troops by extra outside riding. Each 

cadet in the Sophomore «.r Freshman 1 
class, who is taken out as a guest, will be 

allot, il one |x.int. Only one credit per 
guest may be gained for each halt ^\^\ ■ 
Cadets holding riding privilege cards may 
increase- their mounted rating b\ taking 
OUt member* of their troops for extra 
!*\ling. 



An Income 
Reservoir 



Like the reservoir which as- 
sures constant wr.ter supply- 
the I ife Income Plan assures 
a constant income. 
You put surplus earnings in 
it now, and later when earning 
power declines with are. y° u 
drawout$ICOrr< i.thly forl.te- 
$100 monthly whenever cis- 
attcd meanwhile. $10X00 to 
your family if you do not I.ve. 
It's a real income reservoir. 
Write for descriptive "booklet. 

Connecticut General 
Life Insurance Company 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield l^ 731 " 

Greenfield, Mass. 



Hand and Hand with Qiiality : 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



MICKEY - FREEMAN 



ONITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



ANNUAL 

PRE-INVENTORY SALE 

COLLEGE SHOES 

BEGINS 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 1 3th 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



HOCKEY PROSPKCTs 
Prospect i for a victor) in the opening 

hocke •> game- ol the season against Hales 

on rhuraday afternoon have been some- 
what dimmed h\ the recent injury to 
t aptain Joseph II. Forest of the hocke) 

team. During a mis up last I iid.iv he 
suffered a broken rib which will keep him 

from practice- icn several day* and may 

prevent his entrance into the Bate* in 

counter, 

\ jinx seems u> have been on the trail 
ot other member* oi the squad as well, 
lor "Ken" Kiel, received at least one 

broken bom in his |,i,e on the- same cl.iv . 
necessitating a nip to the hospital ami 
confinement in the- infirmary. Dana 
Kiddei also strained a ligament in one 
leg, and leveral have had minor bruises. 
Ill spit,, ol these handicaps, Coach If. ill 
should have a Strong combination on the 
ice- for the opening gun, the- onl\ doubt- 
ful quantity being the- unce r ta inty re 
garding (aptain Forest's ability to play. 



INTERCOLLIGIATB8 

From South Carolina come* the- report 

ol another project for promoting .units 
U twee n nations lor enmity, if you do not 

prefer jaz/i. Collegiate jaa* orchestras 
*l>cnil their summers spreading jasa music 

through European cabarets and across 
w.c\e- lengths. 1 he Carolina (lainerock 
orchestra of the Lni\ersit\ s|k lit the 

summer playing in a Rotterdam cabaret. 

In orcle-r to secure the contract it was 

neee-ssarv to compete in Faris wiili Vale 

anel Williams orchestras. The boys had 
an exciting summer anel promise- to tell 

about it aerially in I hi- Gamtetck, the- 
student newspaper. — The Xai.sttuinit. 



Editors of the Pmly \fnrnon | I'tiiv. of 
( hie ago i, go about the e ainpils wit I) a new 

sense of importance. Tom Mulroy and 

Chuck Anderson, collegiate- tourists n- 

turning from England, report that the) 

found their college ncws|.a|>er an excellent 
|Mss|>ort to high places. "We had to pass 
as foreign correspondent! to the Daily 
Miirmm in order tO gain an cut rami in 
the- House of Commons." they reported. 

— The New Student. 



Large scale btlsim s> ail-ivitics by stu 

dent organisations ha* led to the appoint 

ment e.f a lull time accountant for advisory 
purpose* at the I'niv. of Chicago. The 
ai count, ml will devote his time to guiding 

embryo business executives through ilu- 
maze of budgets, bookke-eping systems, 
and such like. The piac tice is in vogue at 

many iarga universities. 

////• New Studrnt. 



While many ■ nee stadium has been 

brought into existence- b) student initi 

ative, student campaigns for new science 

buildings arc scan I 

The August*** Obstrvtt in an editorial 
insists that a new science- building must 

replace t tn- present inadequate structure. 
"If Augiisiana is t.. attract students who 
arc e.i a scientific turn ol mind, and il 

she is to keep her place- in rank wilh 
other institutions of her class in this 
count!) and lulfill the mission purposed 
b) her founders." / //, \-.c Student. 

Reservations in the dasa ol mm i oi 
Georgia Wesleyan College have bean 

made lor Miss I ,hii.i Ma\ I inch, i, aged 

six months, ot Aiiant.i, Georgia The- 

news OJSpatch docs not state whether the 
prudent Miss I in, he i has her elate lor I he 

Senior Prom. I h, Sew Student. 



A hotel for the purpose ol conducting 

a ionise in hotel manage -1111-111 his U-en 
purchased by the- Weslein Ue-s rVC Uttl 

varsity. The course will include e-\,i\ 

thing !ioi<< kite he n management to 1 he 
problems ol general inanageis. 

S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

S PLEASANT STREET, (up on* Statu) 

Oculists Prescript Ions Pitted. Berokw tons* 
accurately rsptscesd 

BIG BEN ALARM CXOCK8 and other 
rallablo makes 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While II Walt 

NK \ I'Kle KS 

Me-n'f Whole? Solea, Kul.U-i Heels - • • %l.t>i 
Me-n's Halt Soles, Kuhlwr Heels - - • 1.75 
Men's Kublx-r Soles. Rut>t>er Heels - - J. 25 

Mrn'n Half Soles I.. It 



Work Guaranteed --■« ornei ol I"- 
Ainiiy Stl Open till K P. M. 



isunt .iikI 



You »lll tin,) an oicellanl 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at 111 Amlty-Sl.. - Opp. New Theatre 

W* undmtand your tfjuirtmtnls and an pri 

pared l« mtrl yaur MSatl 

All work tuarantted 3sV*N ihintd and tlyrd, 60. 

VINCENT GRANOONIGO. Prop. 



FRAMES 

for those 



Christmas Photographs 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



I own Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 



MATIMI 
MS, 

o\h SHOW 
AT NIGHT 

7.. to 



Friday 

(llll 
6.45. N ..to 



Saturday 

I I Ml 
e. IS K..I0 



M'M.I \l ! NPECI tld 

The |tre-ale-Ki .11 Ir.ui lein 
s ill* e I In- C i,\ , 1 c,| \\ .mon' 
\ Uliiroiis epic of Vnie-rli ii'n 

I .is 1 frontier, ii.mii GUssesa 

I'llslin I- J Ml II III .111(1 \lllli 

t;..inwiili In I III II \\| 
IN*. FRONTIER." \n ah- 
Anit-rleun drama < I 1I1. old 
I Inn- Wise \ Ix-.iiiilful ro- 
mance of VNi-si t'olni and 
the- western fiomicr A 
Ma/init special le- In. II. ins 
and Ca\ulr>m«-n l>> (he 

thousands in Custesr^i m«t 

slai.el New*. Cables and 

a .' nil Coined) I'KICI S 
Mat I Ml. I in, AslUita Met 
Bvoa'gS. Hunt .15c bal. 40c 



tieipld lii-s the knot, and 
i.uilili-s romance- In a srohsf 
surprise In the gresttosl of 

all Minor i.lin ■ lis. 

" LOVE'S Bl JNDM ss, "with 
I'.iiillin- S1.11 ki- and Vnlonlo 
More- no 

Spin 1 liuli 1 anil e:.iiin-il> 



.lean llcrslioll In "Till-' 
OLD SOAK.." Sp.rkllntt 

C.iiii in.- rich and itloMlnU 
siHiihiiiu humor with the 
11 ii alliirlntt flavor of ti.i.k- 
siaitc .Ife. It will warm the 
cock lex of your heart l>on 
Ma ii| 11 U famous siaite play 

thai a.liiih 1. .1 then tr setters 

News and a 1 reel Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMKI.Y TALKS 
Happy New Year! 

Locksmith Repaii shop lake youi 
Nice hank si troubles to 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



DRURTS BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '2b 
and *27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

Firm lieuisf south of rjamptts. 

Telephone 51 1 



Values Extraordinary 
IN 

Leather and Suede 
Jackets 



I 5 % Reduction on 
High Grade 

and 

Imported Golf Hose 



Special on 

Shoe Repair 

Soles and Heels $1.50 



GINSBURG'S, 
19 Pleasant St. 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 



AMHERST, MASS. 



OPEN FOR BUSINESS-opposite Town Hall 

Orders Filled Promptly. 

The Latest Books. 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 



'Pointex'' means perfection and 
'Pointex" is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



NOW'S YOUR CHANCE... 

20 per cent, discount on ALL SUITS and OVERCOATS. A few $25 Sheep lined coats at $20. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST, MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HKNRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

77ie li l&tcaJUL Star* 



SING LEE H ^ DLAUNDKY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mats** 

Our Laundry First Q*1 

Our Polity Ouaran ier«' 

RKPAIKINO AND All. KINDS OP 
WASIIINC; DONI AT KKASONAHI.r. 
PRICKS 

OpiHisile- I'eidt OH.. . 



\\ t-leonie' Muck ! 

Men! W e are j> .i<lv to help voo 
st. u i tin id .-. \.ii 1 1. Iii m nh ,i 

Pal of OXI ORD8 
JOHN FOTOS 

Ml I I M\l< I Slllll MORI 



NETTLETON SHOES. 



EXETER 



Are an unmistakable indication that the wearer is satisfied with nothing hut the best. 
Come in. We'll be proud to show you the new Nettletons. 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



HYANNIS 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12, 1927 



KHiHi Y-IIIRKK STl DKNIS WIN 

Conllmiisl fruiii Pag* I 

Guin "28, K. F. McKHtrick '29, K. W. 
Milligan '27, B. NkkJewics '39, C. II. 
Parsons "27, Miss I'ratt '28, J. I*. Reed 
'27, I- !>• Rheadea '21, E. Kb nay '27. 

L. I I s.n «i ii« '-"•'. D. C. Savage '27. 
V A. Schappette "28, Mies Smith ':.".», 
K. s. SeeU '20, E. L. Speacer '28, F. W. 
Swan 137, A. P. Tunic *28, D. Varteniaa 
••_".», ( . E. Verasr '29, H. F. Verity '27. 



NOTEBOOKS, PAPER, 
prices. BANNERS, 



STATIONERY, and all the necessities for starting in the year right at reasonable 

PENNANTS, PILLOW COVERS. 



YE AGGIE INN 



Social Union Gives 

Third Entertainment 

Mr. Whitney Appears for Third 
Season on Program. 

Making his third appearaacn before 
M.A.C students, Mr. Edwin M. Whitney, 
an interpreter of plays, presented the 
comedy entitled, "Turn to the Right"; 

last Friday ifl Bowhec Auditorium. This 
was the third entertainment whirl) has 

beea pnustntrjrl ends* the a usp ices of the 

Social Union. 



Thk pl.iv was written by Winchetl 
Smith, the author of "The For uae 
Hunter', which Mr. Whitney rendered 
tat year at the Social Cnion cntertain- 

mi .„,s. The play consists of i prologue 
and three tela, Mr. Whitney those it 
because, as he tennad it, it vu "a power- 

lul sermon on mother influence". It II 
theetOT) ol a little, frail, old ...other who. 
without realizing it, changed the live! "I 
tWO criminals through her ki.idm-ss and 
gentleness. ______ 

Committee Announces 

Date of Junior Prom 

Festivities Will Begin the Thursday 

After Easter. 

The 1828 Junior Prom will be held this 



year du inn the week following Ka-t'.r, on 

April 21, 33, ami 28. The program for 

the week will he similar to that of last 
year's I'roni, hut there will be an addi- 
tional art ivity on Saturday afternoon and 
evening. The form of the entertainment 
to take plaee on the last day will be 
announced at a later date. The Prom 
committee has several, well known or- 
chestras in mind and wi I endeavor to 
provide the hest of music. Those who are 

working to make the 1828 Prom leaaoa 

a successful one arc: Alexander C. 
Hudson, chairman; Jack Amatt, John 
Kimball, After! C. Cook, and Horace 
Brockway. 



won by Lambda (hi Alpha. The follow - 

lag gamce have been played: 

L.C.A. 26, KK. 11; K.K. it>, A.T.G. 8; 
T.C. 18, Q.T.V. U; S.P.K. 25, D.P.A. I; 
P.S.K. 8, A.s.P. it, A.G.R. 7. A.T.G. <">. 



4 DAYS 

BEGINNING 

Wed. Jan. 12th 



Academy of Musio- 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 

EVENINGS at 8.15 Saturday Mat. at 2.15 

THE NORTHAMPTON REPERTORY CO. 

PAUL HANSLLL, Manager 



INTERFRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

Intcrfratcrnity baeketball U«'t away to 
I lying start last Tuesday night, Jan. 4, 

at the Drill Hall. 'The opening game one 



INTERCLASS HOCKEY 
The two bockey games played lasi 

Saturday resulted in victories for the 
Juniors and the Two- Years. The Juniors 

triumphed over the Freeh by ■ ecare of 

2 tO 1 while the Two- Years took the 
Sophs into camp to the tune of I to 0. 
lane '28 did all the KOring for the 
Junior-, while Warren ':!<> turned in the 
Irosh's single gOttl, Wells. Two-Year, 
scored the goal which gave the second 
game to the Two-Yeara. 



DRESS PUMPS 

—AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



PRICES: 50c. 85c. $1.10, Including Tax-Mail Orders Filled. 

"CHARLEY'S AUNT" 

A COMEDY IN THREE ACTS 
By Btvadatl Thomas, Directed by Charles Warburton 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

e Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nut*. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKKS OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CHAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 

Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

-THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man 



.*» 




WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



l(s mighty easy to like the best 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 






The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



THAT'S why Camel is the most 
popular cigarette ever made. In 
all tobacco history there has never 
been a cigarette preference like 
Camel's. Nothing is too good or 
expensive that will make Camels 
the world's finest smoke. 

Camel is the friendliest cigarette 
ever made. From early morning to 
night's last reluctant parting you 
just can't smoke enough Camels 
to tire the taste. Camels are the 
celebrated smoke that brought an 



end forever to cigaretty after-taste. 

If you've not yet learned how 
really satisfying a cigarette can be, 
just try Camels. Into this one cig- 
arette the world's largest tobacco 
organization puts every good qual- 
ity that could be wished for in a 
cigarette. All the mild and mellow 
fragrance. The most perfect 
blending. The utmost in smoking 
enjoyment and contentment, 
regardless of price. 

Have a Camel! 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



© 1926 



Starting the New Year Right 



Is an easy matter if you learn to solve your Clothing and Haberdashery problems here. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUU 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



Sit? jMaaMrintagitB (Enlbmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19, 1927 



Number *_k \3 



Musical Clubs' Program 

Proves Very Interesting 

Clubs Open Season with Concerts at Hadley and Florence. 

Novelties well Received 



The Musical Clubs upheld their repu- 
tation of former years in the concerts 
which were given at Hadley on Wednes- 
,la\ , Jan. 12, and at Florence on Friday, 
Jan. 14, both of which places were visited 
last year. The Hadley concert was pre- 
„nted in the Hadley Town Hall under 
the auspices of the senior class of Hop- 
kins Academy, and the concert at Flor- 
,.,u «■ was presented by the Young People's 
Religious Union of Florence, at Parsons 
Hall. As might be exacted so early in 
i he season, there were a few places on 
tin program where slight weakness was 
shown, but with a little more practice 
these should soon be remedied. 

On account of somewhat limited trans- 
DOrtatkM facilities lor these two con- 
urts, a few of the club incml>crs had to 
l„ left behind For the other concerts on 
the schedule, however, this inadequacy 
will be taken care, of, and, in all proba- 
bility, the full iK-rsonnel of the Club will 
be present. 

It must not be supposed that the I .lee 
Club concert is composed of a succession 
,,t group songs. Far from it. The program 
H arranged at present is varied and 
entertaining, utilizing the talents of the 

■embers, and is of ideal length. Besides 

the songs by the Club as a whole, and 
pieces by the orchestra, there are several 
elections by the quartet which are al- 
wavs received enthusiastically by the 
au<lience. Hans Baumgartner '28, pre- 
■eott a novelty in the form of several 
Swiss yodeling songs and is always called 
m fof an encore. Jester J. Hairston '2'.). 
and Donald C. Tiffany "30, render solos 
that are also regarded very favorably. 
Variety and humor are provided by M 
Ml put on by Donald C. Savage '-7. and 
Kdwin EC Marsh 'lis entitled, "Don 
tad His Whatsit". Ernest G. 

McVey '27, and Hairston also do thei 

part toward lightening the evening by 

giving I lew COmic tongS, the best known 
Continued on Pufte 4) 



SORORITY HOLDS 
ANNUAL BANQUET 

Marks the Culmination of Initiation 
Activities Which Began Saturday. 



Delta Phi ('.annua held one of tin- 
largest banquets in its history at Draper 
Hall last Monday evening at which about 
seventy co-eds and faculty members were 

present. Dorothy I.. Leonard 38, vice 

president ol the society presided in place 
of Klladora Hnthsteiiur '27 who was con- 
fined at the time in the infirmary. MIm 
Edna L. Skinner, was also walse to 
.it tend on account of the illness of her 
mother. 

The speakers oa the p rogram were 

Miss Margaret Hamlin, Klla buckler 

"27, EHasbeth Moray 38, Elisabeth A. 

Stcinbugler '_!», and Margaret Donovan 

The banquet marks the culmination of 

a week-end ol activities in which the new 
m e mber s were duly pledged and initiated 
into the sorority. Saturday evening |m-Uv 
initiation took place and some ol the new 
members still retain reminders of the 
evening. Solemn initiation took place 
Monday evening at &30 p. m. in the 
Abbey (enter. 

A list of the initiates is as follows: Mary 
Ingraham '27; Class of '39— Blanche l> 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FEW ANSWER CALL 

FOR SONG-LEADER 



Student Body Shows I it tie Interest 
in Competition. 



Mr Jenkins to Speak at 
Landscape Club Meeting 

Will be Held This Evening in Wilder 
Hall. Everyone Welcomed. 



This evening the Landscape dab will 
haw si its spinier. Mr. Edwin Jenkins, 
rintendent of the Beflefbntaine Gar- 
des*, LenOX, Mass. The subject of his 

iddreM will l>c "Colors in the Garden". 

The meeting will be held in Wilder Hall 
at 7.30 p. m. and all who are interested 
an most cordially invited to attend. 



CAMPUS CALKMMR 



Lift every man holds dear, but the dear man 

Haldi honour far more precious dear than 

life." —lirid (VericUs) 



Wednesday 

•,\ basketball: \\><l Point at West 
1'uint. 
Vanity hockey: West Point U VW-t Point. 
i> in. LaaMCBPe <lul> ■mtlWS, Wilder 

Ratt. 

Inii-itraternity basketball: 
Kappa Sigma vs. Lambda CM Alpha. 
Non-fraternity vs. Kappa Kpsilon. 
Thursday 

Inti-rtr.Uemity basketball: 
i'lu Sigma Kappa vs. Q.T.V. 

(.aninia Rho vs. Delta Phi Alpha. 
Friday 

ii Club Concert at Belcher towa. 

it) basketball: Huston University. 

aoeheyi Union at Schenectady. 

Saturday 

". baeketball: Northeastern at Boston. 

". bockey: Hamilton at Clinton. 
:y relay: Boston I'niv. at Boston. 
-' '"' p. m. Interclass hockey: 

- vs. tem 1927 vs. 2yr. 
p. m. Radio broadcast from WBZ. 
I .lee Club. 
' (O- Year basketball: Vermont Academy. 
Sunday 

■ m. Sunday Chapatl Rev. J. II. 
• ii. BpriagftcM. 

•ui'Mlay 
1 Vent basketball: Smith Agricultural 

■> ruity basketball: 
pha Sigma Phi vs. Kolony Klub. 
C 1 1, Kappa C.amma Phi. 
f,,HI p. m. Radio Forum from WBZ. Prof. 
William t\ Monahan on Poultry. 



At Asaeesbty last Wednesday, it wee 

announced that competition would begin 
lor sonn leader and anyone with any 

ability along thai line waa urged u> u\ 
out. The response Ims not been wer^ 

encouraging so tar. inasmuch as only 
three tut it have leported to Neil ('. 

Robinson J7, the presses' song-lender, 

who is in charge ol the matter. In 
previous ysan thi> position has not beea 
much sought after, and the competition 
has l>een of no account. Consequently, 
the person elected has not always beea 

the best tntcd lor the job. With the 
realization of the value of sinninn as an 

integral part of the College, such .is \t.t- 

coinc this year lo a slight degree, main 
more students are expected to ionic out 
for this activity. 

While the song-leader is very impor- 
tant, the entire student body must stand 
squarely behind him. There should l>e a 
desire on the part of the student l>ody to 
sing, which must Ik- spontaneous and not 
forced. 

There can be BO denying the fact that 
singing is one of the finest ways of uniting 
a Iwidy of people. One has only to k>ok 
hack to the days of the war and call to 
mind how much stress the government 
placed on the value of ringing, to realize- 
how important it is. There i- komethiag 
in the singing of a piece hy a btfSje |TDUp 
of people that tends to draw them doner 

together, serving as a cosesnoa sod 

powerful bond. B esi d es , it is one of the 

most effcetive agents for spreading the 
traditions and spirit of an institution, a 
matter vital to a college. 

The reipiiri in -nts lor leader are not 

war) severe or enacting The candidate 

docs not need to have exceptional vocal 
powers, but must just Ik: aide to carr\ a 
tune and have a passable voice. This 

year the competitors will l>c given oppor- 
tunities Of leading SOngS at the basket- 
ball Karnes, and, at the end of the season 
will b- voted on by the student body. 

It is likely that the song-leader will 
make a number of trips with the different 
teams, Certainty SS attractive feature, 
and will be given a sweater at the end of 
the year. In addition to the material 
gains, the leader has an excellent Oppor- 
tunity for acquiring (Miise and self- 
control, qualities that will be decided 
,1-sets in later life. 



Mystery Play Chosen 

for Prom Presentation 



Tryouts for Prom Show to be Held 
Tomorrow Evening. 



At a meeting with i'rof. Frank l'rcntice 
Rand last Saturday afternoon the Roister 
Doister Dramatic Society decided lo pre- 
sent "In the QctagOtt" as the I'roni Show 
for the coming social season. The author 
of this play is not known. 

This play, which is in three acts, has 
never been presented in t his pari of the 
country, as far as is known. It is unusual 
for its type in that it is a mystery story 
without a detective. Moreover it should 
prove very appropriate for a college 
production because the scene is laid with 

an American college as a background. 

The cast consists of but eight chaiac 
ters and it is tsp s cte d t li.it the competi- 
tion for these parts «ill be unusually 
keen. Even though there are but eiv;lit 

parts to fill, practically each character 
is of a different type. The tryouts will 
Ik- held tomorrow evening at H p. in. in 
the Memorial building. Student a in all 

four classes are eligible to compete in 

the tryouts. 



Next Informal 

to Come Feb. 5 



Committee Adopts New Policy in 
Regard to the Formal Suppers. 



Alter a prolonged attempt to secure a 

lavoiable date, the Informal committee 
has decided to hold the seal mformal 
dance on Saturday, February .">. 

It is hoped thai the new policy of t he 

committee will be welcome news 10 these 

who will attend. Instead of the usual 
formal supper, a light bun Ii will 1m- sei vol 
at Draper Hall between (i and 7 oYlo, I,, 
in an informal manner which will obviate 
the old "hour and a hall" delav . I fencing 
will Ik- in order after Mippci proniplK 
at BvJO. 

\liisie will In- fui niahed bj tin < oq 
l)'()r band, fresh In, in its gut i 
broadcasting at WBZ. "Jakic" ll.it it I 

has banned a wtuoual) harmonic tendi- 
tionol "Some l>av" in addition to aeveral 
new trick numbers. 
The chaperonea will be announced 

later. Those who plan to attend should 
get in touch with some inenilK-r ol the 
Informal committee ;i- -<«>n is [wasible, 
for dee lo i he new |M>licv of the committee, 
tickets will be decidedly 'limited. Tickets 
may be obtained from "Eddie" Haertl, 
••Ka>" Griffin, "Ev" IM.-. "Eddie" 
( oiinell, ami "Ale." Hodson. Price, sa 

usual, will l>e &i. .")<). 



ALUMNI CONDUCT 
NEW SONG CONTEST 



One Hundred Dollars Offered for 
Best Song Submitted. 



An opportunity is now offered t<> all 

Aggie erstwhile COmpOSen and poete m 
the form of a song contest. A niche in 
Aggie's hall of lame awaits you lor bill 
the writing of a song. 

The Alumni Ac ademics Club announces 
the o|K-ning of an M.A.C. Song Content 

which is Open to all four-year under 
graduates and all alumni ol tin loiir-year 

course. The p u rpos e <>f this contest is to 
secure sa M.A.C marching song. It is 
the desire of the Alunini Academics Club 
to have included in this -<>ng the tradi- 
tions and spiri of M.A.C. in six Ii a 

meaner thai it will inspire the alumni and 
undergraduates and all who may hear it. 
A prize of one hundred dollars i- offered 

by the club for the beat mag submitted. 

The following regulations will govern 
t he contest : 

1. The M.A.C Song Contest is open 
to all four-year undergraduates and 
alumni of the four-year course at MAC. 

2. Contestants Stay submit son 

the Song Judging Committee any time 

between January 1, and May 1, Iffl7, 
and must applv to the Alumni office lor 
song contest regisl ration cards Ik fore- 
mailing in their compositions. 

.{. The composition submitted must 
be original in both words and music. 

4. The com|K)sition must be an in- 
spiring M.A.C. marching song. 
(Continued on Page 4> 



Hockey Sextet Defeats 

Bates in Opening Game 

Captain Forest Scores Winding Goal in Second Overtime 

Period. Final Score 2 to 1 



CLASSES ELECT 
OFFICERS FOR TERh 



Dole and Uuiiiii to ftead Seniors 
and Juniors Respectively. 



Last Wednesday a ltern oon the Senior, 

Junior, and Kreshman (lasses held meet- 
ings at which the of fi cers of the vaiious 
classes wen- chosen. The results of I he 
meeting of the Senior class is as follows: 
William L. Dole ol Medford, president; 

Ernest C IfcVe) of North Eastoa, vice- 
president; Robert C. Ames of Falmouth, 
treasurer; Ens M. buckler of Pktafield; 

secretary; William C Amsteie of South 

I >n i held, CSptaia; and I. aw nine E. 

Briggaof Rockland, sergeant -it srass, 

The Junioi class elected the billowing: 

president, John I . Quinn >>i New bed- 
ford, vice-president, I eon. ml I.. Thomp 

son ol Greenfield; treasurer, Harold I 

< .iMiiiiurii on Pane - 

EMPLOYM'T DELEGATES 
ATTEND CONFERENCE 

Value of College Placement Bureaus 
Disi usscd at Joint Meeting. 



last Friday s ft s fn ooa and evening ■ 
group of 70 representatives from New 
l.ngland college* ami industrial oosjonrne 
attended the conference of the neeocJa 
lion of College Employment Officera, 
held at the Lord Jeffrey Ian. The founder 

nl (he Association and its lirsl president, 
I'.iul VY. Viets, who is Stt|K-rvisoi <>l 

Placement Training, presided. 

Among the subjects disrueaorl al the 
conference were such Importanl questions 
a- tin relet ions L twex n business in! 
and college placement bureaus, inter- 
views with prospective employeei bom 
colleges and uniMi itiea, and the |K»int 

nl \ ii u ol I he i oil. .-I emplo) men! offi- 
i ids. The afternoon session was devoted 
large!) to a dis< ussion of the kind of 
information business wanta from the 
college records and ajao how nun b of 
ibis information can be given out. Phe 

Hon was lid by Waller \\ . I>;\ of 

Harvard University and k. N. Miller of 

the Massachusetts I nst it uti- ol bib 

nologv. Mr. \. II. Abbott, r epresent ing 
the alunini of Boston University, and 
Mi— I in v O' Meant <>i the Employment 
Bureau ii Radcliffe tooli part in the die 
cuasion. Prof. Harry R, Wellman <»i the 
P erso nne l bureau of Dartmouth College 

spoke on the subject, "Interviews, Good 
and bad". 

After the afternoon (fiacuaaion there 

was an inlorinal dinner al six ii'iUk, at 

which time John Mills of the Hell Tele 

phone Laboratories, Inc., who was t be 

toaslmaster, (ailed on M-veral for im- 
promplu speei lies. 

Pres id en t Edward M Lewis headed the 

list ol sfter dinner speakers with an 

optimistic word for the future of the 

Dciation. President George D. Olds of 

Amherst < oUege we l co m ed the memben 

to Amherst and < -|k-c ially Dr. Sven 

Knudsen of the Univeraity of Copen- 
hagen, Sweden. The plan- of JeSSE I. 
Strauss, who was unable to attend (be 
conference was taken by Deles Walker, 

superintendent of training in the R. H. 
Mscy store in Men Vdrk. Mr. Walker 
made the jKiini that sbstracl quslities 

BUch as loyally, sense of value, will power 
and opt nnesaof mind wen i onsidcTed more 
significant by employers, than high grade 
standing. 

The name of tin- organization was 

changed to "Eastern College Personnel 

Officera ' and the aim of the organization 

i-, to foster better co-operation between 

college personnel bureaus and industrial 

organizations, beside delegates from all 

of the New England Colleges there were 
delegates from Princeton, Anttoch, New 
York University and the University of 

( openhagen, Sweden. I.. S. Harding 

represented the Associated Industries of 

Massachusetts, a group which includes 
1.7X1 business interests. 



The Mass. Aggie hockey sextet o|>eiie,| 
the season in a fitting manner last Thurs- 
day with an overtime victory over the 
Bate* pucksteis in a game played on (he 
Aggic rink I'lu- final Basra was li to 1, 
but the (earns were on even lenns from 
the iK-ginning of (he second |K-rioi| until 
Captain lores! pushed (he rubber into 
(he ml in thl second overtime |H-rio«|. 

both sides started rather slowly, noth- 
ing spectacular rtsvclopisg until "Duchy* 1 

Swan broke l<M>se bom a melee near the 
bates goal and drove the puck into (he 
cage lot the lust Bcere. I'.ulv in the next 
session the bales captain, lane, attemp- 
ted a shot liom the leiilet of | he rink, 
and the attempt was successful, the 

rubbei Msxpsctediy slipping between 

Galanie'e skates into the Aggie cage. The 
rivals thenceforth WOrkad up and down 
the iie With no pcrreptible advantage I,. 

either side. 

IVnalties on two bat.s pi. mis and one 

M At skalei ledllced the n ber of 

rontestanls lor botk sides early in the 

third parlod, but no s<.,ie was forth- 
coming St thai lime, bates Hashed with 
g.H>d passing and frei|iienl drives al the 
net al this point, bin the gun went off 
with the seme knotted M one all. 

A five minute overtime session gave 
neither team the desired niaigin, so 
goals wen- changed and the bay was on 
again. Here it was that Captain "Joe" 

Forest t<«»k the rabbet, eluded the ten 
wanis, pa rc e fata d ttunngfi the opposiat 

defense- bv some miraculous means, ami 
shot the pmk into tht cage from a dis- 
tance of three or loin vanls. 

The Aggie tanas was unquestlonahli) 

the better Outfit and deserved | |.,i 

Score, bill the work ol the Hales goalie, 
I'abuer, was ol a high order. Willi more 
teamwork and improved passing t he 

M a.< '. -i Mel afsnnhi aewefop Into a 

'Conltnuetl on I'm.- 4, 

InitiatioB Banquets 

Scheduled for Feb. I 2 

Many Alumni Kxpected. Interfrat. 
Sing to Form I'art of Program. 

I here is to |„. an (l |t„ j.,| Mid Winter 
Aluiiini Dav Ibis lenn, ,,s has been the 

tot several years past, ii baring been 
in ■ way i. pi i. i,l by Fall Home Ceasing 

Da) , which look plan during llie hi -i 
term. Ilowevel, it is e\|K< led that manv 
aluiiini will reluin lo the CSaOUS 00 

Feb. l-', wlin h is the daj an wl.n h the 
initiation baaqueta of the vinous fra 

lernilies have been Scbodttlsd to lake 
place. 

Nor is this the entjf aiiiai don whii h 
will Ik- olfered lo the reluming alumni. 
In the afternoon there will Ik ,i hockey 
same, Wftfl ilx- fast Williams team aa 

opponents if enrfy lad fa sri oni msaa 
anything, a eJose battle will be staged, 
following the game, tin Intel fraternity 
Sing, which was inaugurated last vear as 
.111 annual event, will Ik- held in Sto, | 
bridge Hall. The Sing was won last jn 
bv PW Sbnna Kappa, which thereby holds 
one leg on the trophy dip offered as a 
prize. I In cup will hf held iK-nnaiiently 

by the fraternity sdncfi wins the mutest 
three tins 

I he trail initv b.iiH|iiels will Ik- held 
al the linn and pi. hi pvi ii below: 

Alpha I. annua Kin. Hotel \onotuck, 

Holyoke, at H p, m. 

Alpha Sigma Phi In Ik- amioiun e.|. 
I'ella I'hi Alpha Hotel Nniiotuck, 

Holyoke, el x p at, 

Kappa l.psilon While House Inn, 
Noil bamploii. al 7 p. m. 

Kappa Gamma I'hi to be anno un ce d . 

Kappa Sigma lord Jeffrey Inn, Am- 

La mbd a (hi Alpha- Draper Hall, 

MA ( . si 7:50 p. in. 

I'hi Sigma Kappa lord |e||t,y Inn, 
Amherst, al 8 p. in. 

Q.T.V.— Fraternity bsese, Amherst, , t t 

(i p. m. 

I h.ta (hi Hotel Kimball, S[>ring- 
lield, at 7 p in. 

Sigma I'hi l.psilon Hotel Nonotuck, 
Holyoke, at H p. m. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. II 1917 






TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Puplished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



AGRICULTURAL GREEK 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



William L. Dolk '27 

ERKM1 1- Sl'KMlk tt 



Fdiior-in-Chief 
MiiiiuKiiiK EdtttW 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William L. Dot* 

IlAKOI.K K. I I.AKK 

w. Gossan Hutrraa 

IIOVVAKI' \V. Ill Nil K 

Kmn i- Ssaw ss 

Eliswokih I'.aknakd 
John H. IIuwaki) Jk. 

I li I ' 'N 

Faculty & Bhort Count! I'l.WAKiiII.Nic M'.m 
Intercolleulatf Kditor Joskpiiink P AN MCA 

PRAM) HC, B»UCB 



Editorial 
Athletic 8 



Campus N 



•27 

"JK 

■at 

t 

■88 

■ao 

■27 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Chaki.es F. CUWM "87 Boaineai Man 

Irw's II Whitakbs 27 Advertising Managei 

John E. Wh.ik "J7 < IreubUoa Msnes* 

Dm (.i vs W. Loatwi 3* 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 

IIakoi.ii K. Asm i i. "29 

Lawrenci A. « akki in 89 

William A. Bgan '39 
Ekedkrh k i). Thavkr, Jr. 38 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub 
•cribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as sec on.l-cla.s matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at inex Wrate 
of postage provided for in section 1 10S. Act ol Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



DR. C. II. WELLINGTON 



Although Dr. Wellington passed away 
some time BfO, we feel that we should 
devote some time to review his achieve- 
ments. First, let us apologize to our 
readers for being so slow in reporting 
this significant event. 

Dr. Wellington was one of the best 
friends, M.A.C. has ever had. He was 
an ardent alumnus, an able and assiduous 
professor, and a friend, well-informed, 
broad, generous, and sympathetic. 

He was born at No. Bridgton, Maine, 
May 4, 1853, and he died in Amherst, 
Nov. 14, 1926. He was graduated from 
M.A.C. in 1873. He studied further 
here and at the Univ. of Virginia. After 
a term with the U.S.D.A. he went to 
Germany where he earned a Ph.D. He 
returned to M.A.C. and was made 
associate professor of Chemistry; and, 
later, professor and head of the depart- 
ment. Those of us who are acquainted 
with Dr. Peters and who heard him 
speak in Chapel last term can get some 
idea of the impression Dr. Wellington 
made on the Chemistry department. 
Prof. Waugh, in an article on Dr. Well- 
ington, conservatively says, "He was 
sometimes im|>osed upon by students too 
crude to understand what a real teacher 
ought to be; but of course tlure were 
always a few wtih sufficient refinement 
to know him for their master. To these 
he was an unquenchable fountain of 
sympathy and inspiration." 

In closing let us quote the summary 
of Prof. Waugh's article. "Those who 
knew him intimately found in him a 
generous and unselfish friend, a student 
with a flashing mind which touched all 
realms of intellectual interest, a modest 
ami retiring gentleman, too delicate and 
sensitive for the roustalwut world. But 
within the shelter of his home and his 
fraternity ami his ardent friendships he 
was a rare and unmatchable man." 



Although most of the undcrgraduatr- 
of M.A.C. do not know it, the college now 
boasts of a (ireek class. So far, it is one of 
those informal natherings at the homes of 
faculty mem fa m , where some students 
are brought face to face with those 
professors who can give to an interest. rl 
few an extn Ml of their ex|>eriences. 
There are the literary meetings, the 
gathering! for trie thinking and phil- 
osophy, and linalK a gathering to supply 
a want which is not satisfied by the 

curriculum of Maes. Aggie. Some ma) 

be surprised to know that Mr. Dunbar, 

who is conducting this class, has a large 
group. It is apparent, too, that these 
prospective Greek* are after more than 
the ability to recognise the names on 
fraternit) houses, for they have con 
tented to buy text«books. 

Bui why this interest in a dead language 
which thould have been buried, too, 
according to some of our leading edu 

Cators? I'm haps it is the result of some 
(.reek enthusiasts, who have painted its 

mysteries > n sik1 ' attractive colors that 
the uninitiated are eager to see tor them- 

, !\. |, Perhaps i' «■ the desire to under- 
stand all those illegible references and 

allusions which one encounters in reading. 
Perhaps it is a self-imposed test nl ability. 
IVi haps it is a love for language. Perhaps 

it is just plain Intellectual curiosity. We 

daresay that all these factors have been 
instrumental in helping some one to join 
this group. 

Whatever the motive, however, and in 
spite of the fact that this college is not 
classical or "liberal" in nature, we feel 
that the college should recognize those 
who are willing to study in this way. 
There are members of the faculty and 
undergraduates who have long wanted a 
course in Greek. It is a subject which 
has been abandoned by most high schools, 
so that the colleges will have to be the 
only mediums l>etween the student of 
today and the men of this ancient civi- 
lization. Mr. Dunbar, probably, will 
not be back here next year, but there 
must be someone who would carry on 
what he has started in this line. Why 
not a Greek class for those interested, 
with college credit? 



PERSONALS 



AT THE ABBEY 




RIFLE TEAM WILL 
RECEIVE INSIGNIA 



Tompkins should feel imjwrtant after 
Dean Brown allowed him to find a seat 
before proceeding with his sermon. 
P 

Connoisseurs from the 1 lamps proclaim 
Norm Nash the smoothest man they 
have ever seen and Amatt a "divine" 
dancer. Another bSOSt for the Aggie man. 

Mini and Mary have at last siuviiiiilx'd 
to the lure of winter sports, and went 
sleighing up town on a coal wagOSL 
1> 

Dutch AnseU who was elected last 
week at Assembly, began his ca-eer as a 

cheer leader siitim; on the has at the 

Hates game. 

P 

Strangely enough, one of our co-eds 

was discovered op town buying cigars. 

Dutch RudqtttSt, between the periods 
Of the Hat is game, reminded us of car- 
toons of goalies of losing teams, showerisl 

by pucks. I lowever, he did stop ■ few of 
them. 

— p — 

The name of Rtt) < irifluVWOS inadver- 
tently omitted from the third honor list 
in last week's issue. 

P 

Ken Rich, who was blue and also black 
last week has faded sufficiently to leave 
the infirmary. 

P 

Of late the campus walks have been 
blocked bv prostrate pedestrians. 

P 

Dr. Cutler has discovered that Jack 
Cjuinn uses many words to say the least. 

P 

The class in Ag. Eng. 78 is certainly- 
getting plenty of experience on the 
Amoeba. Fords as well as men suffer 
when driven by women. 

Headline from the Daily Hampshire 
Gazette — Cartwright and Black enter- 
tained by M.A.C. football team. 

P 

Huck Love '25 has recently announced 
his engagement to Miss Helen Symmes. 
Huck is teaching at the Norfolk County 
Agricultural School at Walpole. 

P 

"Roses are red" etc., and Merry 
Partenheimer received a box of fudge 



The women students of M.A.C. voted 
on the question of closed versus open 
sororities at Aggie last week. The result 
of the vote was 64 to 16 in favor of closed 
sororities. The ballot is a direct result 
of the efforts of two groups of stud ents 
desiring to organize sororities to find out 
Student opinion on the matter. 
M 



THE MA SSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JAN. 19, 1927 



MILITARY NOTES 



The M.A.C. rifle team lost the match 
fired Jan. 8 against Amherst Colic.. 
642 to 600. A return match is to 1* 
held at a later date. Up to the tim. 
the Collegian going to press the resuh 
the match fired against the University 
of Cincinnati had not been given out. 



Home made food will l>e served to the 
Students at Adams Hall who desire this 
service 08 Sunday evenings. These Sun- 
day night su|)|K-rs will be promoted by 
the Y.W.CA. which is planning to raise 

money CO carry on its work. All orders 
must Ih- received before Saturdav morn- 
ing, and will l>e delivered by Sunday 
evening at six o'clock. 

M 

The radio programs broadcasted from 
WBZ by the students of M.A.C. have 
been so well received that a group of 
Glee Club Kirls has be. n asked to pt< st nt 
a program this coming Saturdav. 

M 

The concert which the (.iris' (.lee Club 
was to have given at ( tisbman last 
Friday evening MM p o s t pon ed until 
some evening this week on account of 
the bad weather which prevailed on the 
scheduled night. 

M 

Marie K. Wells has been elected 
Freshman ntesaber of the Student Council 
of the Women's Student C.overnment 
Association. This is the first year that a 
Irishman has served on the Council, a 
change having been made in the rules 
which allows the Freshman member to 
go into office during the winter term 
instead of in the spring term with the 
rest of the board. This allows the Fresh- 
man representative on the Council for 
two terms instead of one term as was 
previously the case. 



The Department of Military Science 
has obtained the use of a large barn on 
the Brooks farm as a riding stable. 



There has been b competition started 
among the members of the detachment 

at the stable which is connected with 
horse training. This competition will 
continue until the horse show in June. 
There will lie awarded three prises: 
first prize, a large silver cup, a ribbon, 
and *U); second prize, a ribbon, and $7.50; 
and third prize, a riblxin and *.">. 



freshmen will lie permitted to shoot ,,n 

the ride range after they have completed 

the co ur se in ride marksmanship, which 
will be in about two weeks. 



Honor Roll of the Week 
McKittrick and Ames scored perfect 
■cores in the match with Cincinnati. 
Zielinski and Chadwick scored pcesiblei 
in the first Corp area. (A possible i> 
1(K) out of a possible 100. | 



An effort is being made to secure an 
entirely new instrumentation for a H 
pied- band. With this new equipment 
M.A.C. will have as finely outfitted a 
band as may be found in the east. 



t 
'A 



Members to be Awarded R.M.T. In 
the Future. 



from his co-ed table. 




EDITORIAL COMMENT 

We still see crowds around the east 
door of the Dining Hall. It is too bad 
that the short-course men cannot accus- 
tom themselves to the presence of co-eds 
on the campus. We are led to believe 
that they hail from either the Bowery or 
the woods. 

* * I * 
We are still hearing adverse criticism 
of the presentation of "Cotter's Saturday- 
Night". In case the Social Union com- 
mittee has not encountered the same 
attitude, let us present a word for a 
certain group of undergraduates, for no 
program should be continued which docs 
not serve its purpose in meeting the 
undet graduate demand for entertain- 
ment. 

* * * 

We lost ourselves completely and en- 
joyed Mr. Whitney immensely a week 
ago Friday night. Hut we are still eyeing 
the date of Prof. Patterson's appearance 
on the Social Union program with much 
delight. 



It has been found that according to 
the Athletic Council records, College 
insignia may be awarded for participa- 
tion in college rifle matches. As a result 
of this those on the present rifle team 
whose records show that they are entitled 
to the insignia will be presented with it 
at the end of the season. The awards to 
be given here at M.A.C. consist of a large 
M with an R on one side and a T on tin- 
other. 

Fronwiow~on there will be printed in 
the Collegian every week a list of the 
high scorers in the rifle matches of the 
previous week. This list will appear under 
the caption "Honor Roll of the Week". 
In it will appear the names of those who 
■cored perfect scores in the matches fired 
during the week. 

The matches scheduled for next week 
are with Rhode Island State College, 
Kansas State College, and with the 
University of North Dakota. 

The three kinds of "matches fired by 
the rifle team are as follows: the shoulder 
to shoulder match in which the two 
teams fire in one place and in which the 
scores are checked up on the spot, the 
match in which the scores of the contes- 
tants are sent by mail to their opponents 
to be checked, and the match in which 
the results of the shooting are telegraphed 
to the other teams firing. 



It must be great to know that one best 
friend will be in all your classes. 

P 

Inquisitive co-ed at "musical": What 



MUSIC CLUB ENTER- 
TAIN FOR FIFTH SEASON 

Program Made Up of a Great Variety 
of Selections. 



Interest is increasing in the band day 
by day. There have been several new nun 
report at the band room in the last week. 
There has been appointed a librarian to 
look after the music and new pieces are 
being added every week. 



Anyone who has the period from 1 1 to 
12 on Fridays free is invited to try his 
hand at playing in the band. No previous 
knowledge of music is required. 



kind of an agricultural implement is a 

Sweet potato? . 

— p — 

We hear that when you are skating 
the ice rises very quickly. 

Doc C.adsby '24 who has been in Flori- 
da for some time, has now gone to Miami 
to join the large landscape delegation 
three; this largely centers around the park 
department of which J. Gerry Curtis '07 
is superintendent. 



A North College barber shop, in ad- 
dition to the M.A.C.C.A. headquarters, 
is now o|K-n evenings. Jack Quinn, Prop. 



OPI 

WILLIAMS 

Providence 

Harvard 

WESLEY AN 

WILLIAMS 

Eordham 

WILLIAMS 
WILLIAMS 


"ONENTS 


SCORES 

i 


BASKETBALL 

">7 Norwich 17 
31 MIDDLEBURY 27 
35 CLARK 16 
25 Amherst 18 
43 TRINITY 20 
2* WEST POINT 16 


HOCKEY 

6 SPRINGFIELD 1 
4 IN ION 3 







SORORITY HOLDS ANNUAL 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Avery, Edith Bertonshaw, Cornelia 
Church, Marjorie A. Hammond, Guila 
G. Hawley, Mary Kane, Betty A. Lynch, 
Faith Packard, Caroline Soper, and 
Elizabeth A. Steinbugler; Class of 1930— 
Rachel Atwood, Stina N. Berggren, Mil- 
dred Brown May Buckler, Winifred 
Chenoweth, Monica Cotter, Margaret 
Donovan, Evelyn Dover, Lucy A. (irun- 
waldt, Klsie Haubenreiser, Anne E. 
Hinchey, Miriam Loud, Mabel A. Mac- 
Causeland, Gertrude Maylott, Beryl 
Morse, Eileen O'Connor, Evelyn Sand- 
strom, Ruth Stone, Pauline Sullivan 
Margaret E. Sweet and Marie E. Wells 



All members of the student body, 
faculty or College staff, who are mem- 
bers of the M.A.C. Outing Club, are 
extended the opportunity of securing 
snowshoes at cost prices. A reduction of 
four to five dollars may be obtained. 
Those interested please communicate 
with J. E. Greenaway, Lambda Chi 
Alpha House, phone 8325. 



Appearing for their fifth consecutive 
season at M.A.C., the Boston Chamber 
Music Club, under the direction of Mr. 
Julius Theodorowicz, presented a brilliant 
concert last Sunday afternoon in Bowker 
Auditorium. This concert was given be- 
fore a large and appreciative audience, 
and was composed of varied selections 
from the works of great composers. 

The Club chose for its program pieces 
which differed greatly in character. 
Pieces somewhat heavy in character such 
as an "Adagio" by Beethoven were 
played in direct contrast to a selection 
such as the "Thais Selection" by Mas- 
senet, which has a rippling, tinkling, 
little measure. Another number which 
pleased a good many was the "Scarf 
Dance", by Chaminade. Still another 
piece which was well liked by the a udien ce 
was "Panamericana", by Victor Herbert. 
This latter piece has embodied in it 
several quite distinct movements such as 
the Indian character of the first part, 
and the Southern of the following portion. 
The program follows: 

1. Panamericana 

2. Espana, Waltz 
8. Venitienne, Carcarde 
4. Scarf Dance 
ft, (a) Prelude, Op. 28, No. 4 

Rachmaninoff 

(b) Guitarre Moszkowski 

6. Adagio from Pathetic Sonata Beethoven 

7. Thais Selection Massenet 
As an encore Mrs. Theodorowicz played 

"La Cygne", (The Swan) by Saint Saens, 
and the Club played "Moment Musical", 
by Shubert, and the "March of the Little 
Lead Soldier", a very pretty little selec- 
tion by Tierne. 



There will be a meeting of the rifle 
team at the Drill Hall today. The pur- 
pose of the meeting will be to elect a 
captain and a manager. 



Freshmen Score Easy 

Victory Over Smith 

Frosh Start Drive in Second Period 
and Hold Lead. 



Herbert 

Waldteufd 

Godard 

Chaminade 



The freshman basketball team was an 
easy victor over Smith Agricultural School 
by a 29-10 score in the game played in 
the Drill Hall last Friday evening. The 
Freshmen acquired a decisive lead of -"• 
5 before the end of the first half, anil many 
of the second string men saw service dur- 
ing the rest of the game. 

The teams appeared evenly matched 
during the first few minutes of play and 
the period ended with the score at 3-all. 
In the second quarter however the Fresh- 
men started a drive and tallied basket 
after basket in quick succession, making 
seventeen points to their oppomnts two. 
The game was quiet during the List half. 
Several' substitutes were in the lineup 
during a large part of the time and there 
was little scoring, the Smith players re- 
maining largely on the defensive. 

EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 
Mr. Carlton D. Richardson of the Hoard 
of Trustees of the College *Prof. Clifford 
J. Fawcett, Extension Professor of Ani- 
mal Husbandry, Miss I^orian P. Jefferson, 
Assistant Research Professor of Agricul- 
tural Economics, and Director Sidney B. 
Haskell of the Experiment Station, par- 
ticipated in the program at the annual 
meeting of the New Hampshire Farm 
Organization at Concord, N. H., January 
13 and 14. 



There will be the usual Saturday after- 
noon hike to Mount Toby next Saturday. 
The party will leave'at 12.30 p. m. on 
the bus for Sunderland. The objective 
is the cabin where a fire will be built 
and an hour of sociability will follow. 
Those planning to take the hike should 
bring a cup and spoon as hot drinks will 
lie served. The party will return in time 
for supper. 



CLASSES ELECT OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Clark of Montague; secretary, Marjorie 
J. Pratt of Dalton; captain, Albert C. 
Cook of Waverly; and sergeant-at-arms, 
Warren J. Tufts of Jamaica Plain. 

The voting of the Freshman class is 
still rather undecided because with six 
officers to be elected, only four were 
chosen. The following were elected: 
president, Eric Singleton of Brooklyn, 
N.Y.; vice-president, Richard H.' Bond 
Jr. of Needham; treasurer. Hermit K. 
Kingsbury of Leominster, captain, George 
W. Noble of Pittsfield. 



Two new appointments in the experi- 
ment staff are Miss Esther Davies as 
Research Professor of Home Economics 
and Professor R. H. Mighell as Aslant 
Professor of Farm Management. 



Dr. Henry T. Fernald, Professor and 
Head of the Department of Entomology 
represented the College with Dr. rran 
A. Hayes, Research Professor of I'ouK ■ 
Husbandry, and Dr. Jacob K. Se»i 
Research Professor of Pomology at 
winter convocation of the Ai" tru "j 
Association for the Advancement 
Science, held during the holidays 
Philadelphia. 



For your health, CONSULT A DOCTOR. 

But for your appearance which is fully as important 



For your teeth, CONSULT A DENTIST. 

"CONSULT TOM". 

THE HOUSE OF WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



BIG REDUCTION 

ON ALL 
BROKEN LINES OF 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

THIS MONTH 

B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



TWO- YEAR QUINTET SWAMPS 

AMHERST HIGH, If, TO 5 

The I wo Yr.n basketball quintet 
soared en overwhelming 2S-S victor) 
over Amherst High in .1 game ptsyed in 
the Drill Hall List Wednesdaj afternoon. 
I his was the second game ol the season 
for the 1 wo Yean and the second victor) 

At no time during the game did tin 
high school team furnish dangerous oppo 
sition. Their on!) I>.i>k< t from the Boor 
was scored b) Connori sear the close of 
( In Inst half, tin- other three points 
being scored on fouls, 

Holland, captain of tin [*wo I 
eras the biu scorei <>i the da) end accoun 
t< ci tin twent) oi the I wo \ ears points 
with nine baskets sad two foul shots. 
He \n.i> materially sided l>\ the pod 
Moor work oi Parsons who ^,i\c him man) 

assists, 



FARM RADIO FORUM HAS 

NEW BROADCASTING HOI R 



Farmers and In 



ime makers who arc 




When You Slow Up 

When natural forces fail, the 
yachtsman depends on motor 
power to carry him on. 

When strength declines with 
age, and earning power de- 
creases, our Life Income Plan 
will carry you along. It will 
pay you $100 a month for life 
after age 65, or earlier if dis- 
abled. 

The same contract will pay 
your family $10,000 if you die 
young. 

Send for descriptive booklet, 
"Pension Yourself". 

Connecticut Genera] 

\-ife InsuranceCompany 
ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1K73 M 

Greenfield, Msee. 



interested In receiving farm and home 
facte ova the sir should tune their radio 
M-t>. in the future, ia on station WBZ si 
1 hese new hours, 

I Im reguiai farm radio forum which 
baa I e. n ^oitiK on t he sir at '.". 10 Tuesday 
e\. ninga »dll go on'at 6.00 p. m. beginning 
Januai) 18. 

"Aunt Sammy's" talks for housewives 
"ii Wednesda) evening will changi the 
■ami week to a new bout ol * ■ . * k » p. n. 
instead of 7.16. 

Saturda) evening'i entertainment pro 
gram from M.A.C., whs h start* d Jan B, 
will go "ii 1 in- sir al f>. IS p, m. instead ol 

7. (HI. 

I lii> i< .nun- it given l>\ student end 
facult) talent from the Massachusetts 
Agricultural ( 0U1 ge, such a- I .In t labs, 
quartets, orchestra, readers, and other 
entertainment leal urea, 

The market newsservice now supplied 
by the State end United States Depart 
"itiii of Agriculture 00 Monday, Tues- 
day, Thursday, snd I rida) evenings will 
beginning Januar) 17, k<. on the air al 

•Voo p, 111. ill-lead ol 7.36. 

S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

i PLEASANT STREET, (up o>« »»4hU 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken l«aso> 

accurately replaced 

UK. BEN Al ARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



Town Hall, Amherst 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 

Men's Whole Soles, Rubber Heels - • ■ IJ.S8 

Men's Half Sole*. Rubber Heels • • • I.7S 

Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels • • i.U 

Men's Half Soles . I ts 

Work Guaranteed — Corner of I'lriiaant and 
Amity Su. Open till 8 P. M. 



You will Snd an cicellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRINC SHOP . . . 

equipped with the moat up-to-date floodjret 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
■ t 111 Amliy-Si., . Opp. New Theatre 

Wt understand your requirements end mrt pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
AU work guaranteed Shoes shined and dyed, S0> 

VINCENT CR ANUONICO. Prop). 

The Party Season 

IS ON 



NEW TALLIES 

Published January 1, 1«»27 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Wed. 
I burs. 

M ATI Ml 
.1.00, 

ONI SHOW 

AT NIGHT 

7 ..III 



l-rkl.i.v 
Ml 

0.4V N..UI 



Saturday 

A.0O 

4.48 I.JS 



Bust) 1 k i-.iilntt In 
•BATTLING HI 1 1 *K" 
lit- won a In Mr !>> poslnil 
as 1 In- Kuttllnsi llutliT. 
1 Inn 1 he rent Battle)* ap- 
im'.iikI on 1 li«> scessei whut 
slili -s|iMi ilnit romptu .iiious 
what whirl* Ind of fun. 
with Rusts* K 1 .< 1 011 win- 
ning iln- I. mull 1 huni|>ion- 
shlp, h. mils down, in <)■<* 

funnies! prize liiilu evrr 

foiiulii \n added attrac- 
tion, • II IRTING WITH 

HI Mil This is .1 ski nie- 
lli n- > er> 111 lie I. Ilk t- rite one 
» e show «-»! last > i- 11 
New* Pahlee, 

K.iiol.u I'rli • 
\ilnlis. JAc ( liiUtreu Hie 



III. TlMI-'lKISS" lien - 

is the brilliant, eolorful 
tajeol an jiiiu/imi beauty 

w ho nines ll.inicllke . ihioii 
the li\ es if line Told an 

onlj lihisio Ibenes can ii-ll 
a at fin story, With Greta 

Garbo, \ntonlo Moreno, 

I I on el Ittirrviiiore . Hoy II'- 

\ieh> \ M.ir. M.i« Deimoll. 

Spin illiihi iiml < uiii.ilv 



Kiuloiph \ alentlno in 

Till SON OP \ Sill IK" 

wilh \ 1I111.1 Hunk) Iioiii 1 lu- 
ll owl b> 1 ■'. m iinii linn 

the liner of liners ihe 
sheik of shfik* spin kliou 
News mitt Two reel tanned) 



THOMPSON'S TIMKI Y TALKS 

ALUMO Skate Outfits V, 110 and $1-' 
Snow Stseaa, skis at reduced pre 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMIII KSI BANK 



MURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 
120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties. | 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south of campus. 
Telephone 511 



SPECIAL SALE ! 



EVERYTHING AT DISCOUNT. 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

AMHERST, MASS. 

OPEN FOR BUSlNESS-opposite Town Hall 

Orders Filled Promptly. 

The Latest Books. 



"Pointex" Hosiery 

Style 265 Service Weight $2.25 

New 4 Inch Lisle Top 

Style 255 Service Weight $1.95 

"Pointex" means perfection and 
"Polntei" Is made only by "Onyx" 



G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY- OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Order your Tuxedo early for Fraternity banquets. 

A new and complete stock of Tuxedo shirts, ties and accessories on hand. Remember we are selling suits and overcoats at close out prices. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



CUTLER 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



DEALERS IN 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best In Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best In Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



gu ftsMtcUtt 



SING LEE HAWP UUWDItY 

No. 1 Maun St., Amherst, Mast 

Our Laundry Pint Ctaaa 

Our Pellcjr Guarantee*' 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Pout Office 



Welcome Back! 

AKgie Meal Wo are ready to help you 

start the new year riRht with a 

Pal of OXFORDS 

JOHN POTOS 

SrXP-SRRVICK SHOE STORE 



MANHATTAN SH I RTS. Of the several exclusive features found only In Manhattan Shirts, the fit of the collar is the most outstanding. 
These shirts known as the best made are'sold at popular prices. New shipment of White Oxfords just arrived. 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



IIYANNIS 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19, 1927 



ALUMNI CONDUCT NEW SONG 

Continued from I'uie 1) 
f). No contestant may submit more 

than one coiii|x>sit ion. 

C. No nioic than two partus may be 

represented in the authorship of MM s<»ng. 

7. The music ami words may both be 
theconi|K)sition of one author or the music 
may In- written by one person and the 
words by another. 

8. In the event that the winning com- 
ixtoition represents joint authorship, the 
prize will Ik- divide<l equally between the 
two authors. 

9. The Song Judging Committee re- 
serves the right to reject any or all songs 
submitted. 

10. All rights and copyrights of the 
winning song shall be the property of 
the Associate Alumni of M.A.C. 

Write to the Alumni Office for further 
information. 



Strictly hand-made SNOW SHOES at wholesale prices. The finest we have ever seen. 

SEE SAMPLES AT 

AGGIE INN^= 




Mu*n. AOftte 
1-ori-st. Nasli. lw 

FraWi c 

Sw.in. rw 
l-'urwill, Id 
Abraliainson. rci 
Galanie. u 

(ioals Swan. FsSSSt, UM Referee— Dowel. 
Goal umpires— Mills and Mulhern. Timer— 
Anderson. Time— three 15-minute and two 
5-minute jwriod*. 



Bates 

rw. White, l.ammin 
, . l-'oster 
lw, Lain- 

nl, OsK'xxl. Thomas 
Id, Malta 
g, Palmer I 



1 1 . Solo 

Mr. Hairston 

12. Selection* 

Quartet 
Uk Sontt ol the Western Man 

Aim. i Man ] 

Glee Club 



I'rotheros 



HOCKEY SEXTET DEFEATS 

(Continued from Page I) 

formidable combination, for the stick- 
work and skating exhibited last Thurs- 
day was the best which has been seen 
here in several years at such an early 
stage of the season. A plentiful supply 
of good ice and the presence ol several 
veterans and promising new men has 
aided in the moulding of the 1907 sextet. 

Swan repeatedly outakated hie oppo- 
nent, and Abraham**) featured with 
several daehea through the Bate* team, 

while the work of Captain lorcst was 
deserving of especial mention since he 

had been kept from practice during the 
previous week because of an injury to 
his cheat. 
For Batet, Foater at center ice and 

( apUia lane were particularly good, the 
latter being adept at snatching the puck 
from advancing skaters. 

A battle royal is anticipated when the 
t«Q teams meet again in l.ewiston on 
Jan. 29. The summary: 



MUSICAL CLUBS' PROGRAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 
of which is "Romeo and Juliet". Harold 
K. Ansel! '29 is slated to add further 
variety by giving an exhibition of fancy 
dancing. At both of the concerts, the 
Clubs have had appreciative audiences. 

The Club orchestra provides music for 
a (lance following each recital at which 
both the Club members and the audience 
proceed to enjoy themselves. 

The following is the program as pre- 
sented at Hadley and Florence: 



INTERFRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

Only three interfraternity basketball 
games were played at the Drill Hall last 
week. The newly organized non-frater- 
nity team scored a victory in its first 
appearance as a contestant for the cham- 
pionship by trimming Delta Phi Alpha. 
The following games were played: 

Non-fraternity 8, D.P.A. 4 

P.S.K. 14, L.C.A. 12 

A.G.R. 22, K.G.P. 6 



day evening with a very success! ul meet- 
ing, at which there were about fifty 
peraane present. The speaker of the 
evening was Mr. John Abbott, who was 
formerly connected with the College, and 
is now associated with the Northern! 
Division of the Soil Improvement Com- 
mittee of the National Fertilizer Associ- 
ation. Mr. Abbott's talk, which was 
illustrated by lantern slides, was a dis- 
cussion of the qualities necessary to a 
successful farmer. 

The next meeting of the Animal Hus- 
bandry Club will be held on January -'**>- 
The speaker will be announced later. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 

The Animal Husbandry- Club started 
its activity for the new year last Thurs- 



DRESS PUMPS 

— AND— 

CAMPUS SHOES 

The Largest assortment in town 



Students at the University of Califor- 
nia have developed a desire to sing. The 
first fifteen minutes of each day are 
devoted to singing California songs under 
the supervision of "minute" men. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



1. College Sonus 

(,lee Club 

•J. Orrhestra 

ft, Rolling Down l" Kio 

Banjo Sonn 

Wee t lub 

I. Solo 

Don Tiffany 

.">. Invicius 
Sylvia 

Oiiartet 

(i. Yodeling 

Hans Haiimnartner 

7. O Captain. My Captain 

Morning 

Clee Club 

S. Don Savage and Ml Whatsit 
9. Romeo ami Juliet 

Messrs, McVsy and llairston 
10. Some Fancy MSBSJMI 

Dutch Anaell 



lUrman 
Homer 



lluhn 
Speaks 



Anderson 
S peak s-Raldu in 



College 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

•THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 



men 



prefer 

PA: 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



BLOND gentlemen and dark-haired gentlemen 
diffident* freshmen and august seniors . . . 
Prince Albert is the overwhelming campus- 
favorite of every type and every pipe. (Yes, 
the pipes do have a voice in the matter. They 
can act in a docile, friendly manner or they can 
be mean. It depends on what you feed them.) 

Open a tidy red tin of good old P. A. That 
first fragrant whiff will tell you why gentlemen 
prefer Prince Albert. Tuck a load into the bowl 
of your pipe and light up. Fragrance and taste 
alone are enough to win you. 

But P. A. doesn't stop there. It is cool- 
smoking. It is mild as Maytime, yet it has 
plenty of body. It is kind to your tongue and 
throat. You can hit it up all you like and it 
never hits back. Try a tin of P. A. You'll 
certainly prefer it after that. 




P. A. it told everywhere fcl 
tidy red tint, pound and half- 
pound tin humidors, and 
pound crystal-glass humidors 
with sponge-moistener top. 
And always with every bit 
of bite and 'torch removed by 
the Prince Albert process. 



♦Not too diffident. 



FRINGE ALBERT 

. — no other tobacco is like it! 




O 1927, R. J- Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-saiem, N. C. 



OVERCOATS 

Soecial lot of highly desirable coats at a quick clearance price of $35. There are not many left and qu.ck act.on ,s necessary. 

Spec 8 SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



®h? iiaBBarljttBdtB QtaUfmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26, 1927 



Number 14 



Prom Show Cast Chosen 

As Result of Try oats 

Members from Ml Potlf Classes Win Parts in "In The Oc- 
tagon" after Keen Competition. No leading role in Play 



Tiir cast ol character* which was 
ted ImI Thur-.il.iy night, a- .i result 
ol the tryouti [or the Prom Show, "In 
tin- Octagon", it ceenposed largely of 
those who are already known for their 
activitiei in connection with the Roister 
I loistere. 

\ large number <>t aspirant! for fame 
behind the footlights presented them- 
selves at tin tryouts, un<l the competition, 
ilwayi keen, was especiallj so this year, 
because <»f the unallnete of the cast. There 
.ill told, only eiglu ili.u.u ten in the 

play, which is also rather unusual in thai 
there i* no real leading role, no one 
character which dominates the plaj and 
overshadows the others. The part of 
"Ralph Proctor, the typical college nun", 
which is probably the moat important, 
«ill be played by Neil C Robinson. 
I be following b the complete cast : 
Dr. ftyverieh. .Maxwell 11. Goldberg '-'s 
Ivan Hamilton.. Kenneth A. Bartlett "28 

1'rolcssor I.ampson. . .Robert 1,. Fox '28 

Ralph Proctor Neil C Robinson '27 

Donald Dobeoa Henry W. Jensen '••*»> 
Doris Heffcrint on, . Anne L. Hinchey '-'in 

Anne Dudley Miriam II. flBM "98 

Men's understudy 

Donald H. Campbell '27 
Women's understudy 

Lucv A. < Irunwaldt •'><• 



Aggie Defeated 
by West Point 

Quintet Receives First Defeat of 
Season at Hands of Army. 



BOSTON UNIV. BOWS 
TO AGGIE QUINTET 

lloopsters Win Second Home Came 
in Fast Contest, 19 — 12. 

Ihc Mass. Aggie quintet stepped into 
the win column again by turning bach 
the last Boston Universitj basketeera last 
Friday evening on the Drill Hall door. 
The game was hotly contested although 
it sraa slowed up somewhat bj numerous 
fouls, lhc anal score was M At", in, 
15.1 . 12. 

both teams were rather sloe in getting 
started, feehng out the opponent's de- 
fense and searching for ■ chance to score. 

1 lu- first action was supplied by "Kav" 

Griffin when be managed to break loose 
and conned with the hoop for s neat 
basket. Alter the initial counter the 

Agates started a determined drive lor a 

victory, working the hall down the court 
and then depending on Griffin or Thomas 

to toss it through the hoop. The B.U. 

defense was forced to put forth its best 

playing to keep the sears down to tea 

points. The score at the end of this 
|H-riod was \|..\ < . Hi, B.U. .'J. 
(Continued on Pate .») 



The Mass. Aggie hoopsters dropped 

their first away-from-honie game of the 

■easoa to West Paint List Wednesday 

• by ;» score <>f 3eV2a Stow oefssMnve 

work and failure to adjust itself to un- 

i.iiniliar playing c on d iti o ns were reapon- 

■bls for the team's defeat. 

West Point's second teem started the 
sssac and the fast playing of ( .rittin and 
r.irtcnheiiner put the teams on even 
terms during half of the first period The 
i( team was slow on the defense, how- 
rver, and took some time to adjust itself 
the unfamiliar playing conditions in 
it- first game on the old Drill Hall floor. 
As | restdt, Army was h ading 20 1 1 at 

ball time. 

The Army first-string players took the 
BOOT during the second half but were 

mmh lens s uuse e fal than their second 

String predecessors, ontscoring Aggie by 
only three (joints during the half. With 
onk lour minutes to go Partenheimer 
sad Crifnn cut boas again, but Army 
had too much of a lead. 

'Continued on Pad* 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



fTlilritlT it a mirror, in u/ii.n everyone 
his ima%e." — (ioethe. 



U.'dnesday — 
Interfraterniiy baihettall: 
LassMaCU Alpha vs. Tests Chi 
Alph;. Gamma Kl»> v- KSVfM BpsUM 

r I.". i>. m. ( i.i— hockey: 

isae vs. twa i»27 n. a >r. 

I p. m. Uadscape < h* Mcetins, Wadet 

II, ill. 
Thursday — 
Interfraternity bsshetbsU: 
Kappa Haws vs U T.\ . 

SigfM t'hi Kpsilon W. Non-1- r.'t.-rmty 
J 00 p. in. CkM hockey: 
, v-. 1938 
Friday — 

•y hockey: I olby. Wat.-rville 
Q p. ni. Social t'nion: PlttJF. Psrker, 
Soteial and Cartoooht. 

UatN Key Dance. 
Saturday — 

ity hockey: Bate-. LeaisUm, 
ty basketball: Maine. Orotio 
p. m. Radio broadcast from WBZ: I'bi 
Sigma Kappa fraternity. 
■Sunday — 

•a.m. Sunday Chapel: Bishop Edwin 
H Hughes, Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Chicago, 111. 
Tuesday — 
Two-Year basketball; Holyoke High. 
Interfraternity basketball: 
Umbda Chi Alpha vs. Alpha Sigma Phi 
Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Kappa Epsilon 
MO p. m. Radio Forum from WBZ: Prof. 
Ray M. Koon. on Vegetable Gardening. 



Landscape Club 
Holds Meeting 

Mr. Jenkins DtecMSaesj the Value of 

improM-d Sdsool Gardena. 



TWO-YEARS HOLD DANCE 
FOR FOOTBALL SQUAD 

Sweaters and Insignia Presented at 
Invitation Dance by Prof. Hicks. 



An invitation dame was held last l-'ri- 
day evening in the Memorial Muilding for 
the memUrs of the 1996 Two Year foot- 
ball team. Before the dance, Prof. Curry 
S. Hick.s presented the sweaters and in- 
si^ma to those who played on the team 
and after this event short speeches were 
made by Arthur W. Hurrill of Wtllesley, 
who was captain of this year's team and 
hy Howard G. I'ulsifer of Natick, who is 
captain-elect of next year's leant. 

Insignia were awarded to the following 
men who received sweaters last \ ( .ir: 
Arthur \\ . liurrill of Wellesley, William 
J. ( affrey of ( romwill, ( onn., and Leslie 
('. Holland of Holyoke. The following 
men were awarded sweaters as well as 
insignia: Bradford II. IJutler ';{() of 
Newburyport, William S. (hate ';{() of 
South Dartmouth, Mario Nicolai of 
ScHnerviHe, Guetaf C. Nihnon of Worces- 
ter, Samuel S. Peabody of Manchester, 

Howard ( .. I'ulsiler ' 10 of Natick, Ralph 
\Y. Smith of \\\<U- I'ark. Theo.lore E. 
Waldo of Boylston Centre, Kdwin K. 
young of Worcester. 

Many couples danced to the music of 
Mates' Collegians until eleven o'clock. 

The refreshments consisted of punth, 
ICC (ream and cookies. Dint lor and 
Mrs. Roland II. YcrUck and I'rol. and 
Mrs. Curry S. Hicks were the patrons 
and patronesses. 



Informal to be Held at 
Amherst Women's Club 



Attendance will be Limited Because 
of Size of Club Room. 



The Informal Committee announces 
that its first winter term informal dance 
will be held at the Amherst Women's 
Club on Saturday, February •"). 

To those who have never attended 



( hie ol the most interesting meetings ol 

the Landscape Club was held in Wilder 
Hall last Wednesday evening. President 
A. Rodger Chamberlain "27 ol the Club 
introduced the speaker of the evening, 
Edwin Jenkins oi the Bellefontaine Gat 
dens, Lenox, Ma>s. 

While Mr. Jenkins' topic was "Color 

in the Garden", the first part <>i his talk 
was an informal recounting ol experiences 
in foreign gardens, particularly the conn* 
try gardens ol England. In connection 
with English gardens, Mr. Jenkins nun 
tioned the lack oi such delightful spots in 
this countr) with their privacj and old 
fashioned charm. The speaker mentioned 
the historical associations oi m.un of the 

old English garden-. SUC9 as the Murlord 

Bridge Inn gardens where Keats. Mere- 
dith, and John stu.ni Mills were visitors. 
Mi. Jenkins was wi v nun h concerned 
with the problem <»i improving school 

ground:. "The little red sehoolhouse, 

while sentimentally appealing, is a dis- 
grace," he maintained. Another rather 
vital remark front l>oth a sociological and 

a technical landscape standpoint, was that 

"the most impressionable years ol a child's 

life are s|Hiit in school. If that place, 
inside and out, is a thing ol b eaut y, it is 
going to help the child to conceive U-atlty 
and think of In-tter things." 

His demonstration ol the Munsell 
method of color notation, of recent (lis 
COVery, was most interesting. By this 
method it is possible to determine tin 
Correct complementary colors in a flower 
garden with scientific exactitude. 

The next meeting of the club will Ik 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 2»'», at 7. .'{(>. The 
Speafesr will be Thomas II. Desmond of 
Simslutry, Conn., a professional landsca|>e 
architect. 



Dr. Coffin Speaks at 

Friday Morning Chapel 

Compares Man's Faith to the Chloro- 
phyll of a Plant. 



In chapel last |-rida\ morning, Dr. 

Hi m v Skene Coffin, rVeaiclenl of Union 
Theolog i cal Seminary, d eli v e red an ad- 
dress, the contents of which tar exceeded 
its length. 

Dr. Coffin cosapared the chlorophyll of 

a plant to the faith of mail. He Stated 
that jusl as c hl orop h yll is the connecting 
link between ihe sun's energy and the 
green coloring of a plant, the medium 
that transforms the energy into the 
^Continued on Pafte 4) 



Press Group 

Reorganized 

Undergraduates to Aid in Furthering 
College Publicity. 



,! 



afternoon dance in this old-fashioi 
mansion, a delightful surprise is in St 
Many remember with pleasure the Delta 
Phi Camma dances which have la-en held 
there in the past. The place is ideal for 
dancing, but due to its size, attendance 
must t>c decidedly limited. Lac h member 
of the Informal Committee- has a few 
tickets. It is advisable to get in touch 
with a member immediately. 

The Amherst chaperones will be Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry C. Hawley. Mr. Hawley 
is connected with the Department of 
Agricultural Economics. The Mount 
Holyoke and Smith College chaperones 
will be announced later. 



rndergradu.ites are once more taking 
an active- part in College publicity even 
though the group has been organized but 

a week. Fifteen students lespooded to 

the call of the Faculty Publicity < c,m 
mittee for student corrcs|>ondcnts. Mr. 
Robert I). Hawley, Secretary of the 
College, presided at the- first mee-ting and 

explained the purpose of the move me m 

to those who were interested. 

This enterprise is realty a continuation 

of the movement which was •tatted two 
rears ago when Mr. John A. Crawford 

resigned his ix>st as Eatansion Editor of 

the Cofiege. His newspaper work was 
taken over by a group of faculty members 
and undergraduates who attended to the 
repor tin g of College news until this past 
fall. 

The new reorganization of the group 
has made possible the reporting for prac 

tically every newspap e r of any httperteuce 

in Massachusetts. With the renewed 
interest among the undergraduates in 
this line of work, it is hoped that more 
attention will Ik- devoted to the student 
activities as well as to the extension work 
of the College. These correspondents will 
be glad to receive any items of interest 
in connection with the College and such 
material should be forwarded to Mr. 
Hawley at the President's Office or to the 
respective correspondents personally. 



Hoopsters Surprise Fans 

and Defeat Northeastern 

Alumni from Grwtfif Boston See Affile Stage- Comeback and 

Win from Favorites, .W-17 



JUDGING TEAMS 
HAVE BUSY SEASON 



Stock and Dairy Products Judging 
Teams are Most Active. 



A summer) "I the work ol the judging 
teams which have represented the Col- 
lege dining the lust part ol the college 

year shows that the Stock Judging tc.iins 

anil ilu- Daii\ Products Judging team 
have been by far the most active, having 
competed in contests at the Eastern 

Stales Exposition, at the- National Daii\ 

Show, and at the I nte-i ii.ii ioual Livestock 

Show. 

Iii the Fat St,., k contest held at the 
Eastern States Exposition, with six teams 
competing, Miss Klla Buckler ens tiist. 
and the Massachusetts team stood fifth. 
The members <>i ibis team were Miss 
Buckler, Miss Southgate, II. Baumgart 
mi, I . Rhoadea, ami J. Pareons. In ihe 

Dairy Cattle Judging contest at the same 
place-, with ten teams Competing, I he 
M.A.C team stood ninth with a total ol 

339ui'points, The inemb era <>f the team 

were' K. Milligan, ('. Parsoae, and K. 
Continued on Paga 4) 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

BROADCAST AT WBZ 



(.iris Make First Appearance on 
Aggie Broadcasting Program. 



Last Saturday evening at the usual 
hour for the M.A.C. studi-nfs' broadcast, 
a group ol ( ile-e Club girls broadcasted a 
program of Aggie songs and sketches 
from the WBZ studio at Springfield. 
Mr. timxlwin, the college alumni s» . If 
tary made the announcement and intro- 
duced the Aggie co-eds to the radio 
world. Along with other selections, the 
regular double- trio ol the club sang "The 
Hig brown bear" which went off so 

creditably at the lost concert oi the- club. 

Mrs. A. B. beatiinont accompanied t he- 
girls to the studio and directed the sing 
ing. The members of the club who made 
the- trip are: l.ora Matehelder '2H, pi. in 

iste; Km 1 1 Davison 17; Josephine Pennies 

and Frances Thompson '^s; kuth Faulk, 

Miriam lluss, Alice Johnson, and l.li/a 
betk St.iiibuglcr 'li'.); and Marg.o.i 
Donovan and Kathryn Knight ".it). 

The progress broadcasted follows: 

1. Akkw. My Annie 

■> | hasp Is •• ( "ii.iin V.dle-y 

Charts l'n'i bf Mm. an llii" in.i i'i.m.1-. 
TfcMBpm 

I I'kiiio selection by ISSBSSSat I ><»iit. .in 

.O. Tlic- HiK Brown BaM 

<i. When TwiliKli! ShaOowi Dfapes 

7. Ash fttatci 



Students Show Great 

Interest in Ynkhorne 



Material for Second Issue Rapidly 
Being Turned In. 



The Bret issue- of the Ynkhorne, which 

made its first appearance last spring, 
( reeled such a favorable impreaaion, that 
it was decide d at the time to continue the 

new undertaking as long as the- under- 
graduates took sufficient interest in the 

project. 

During the fall term a group of st u 
dents, who were inter es ted la seeing this 
publication carried on, met regularly at 

the homes of Mi. Walter A. Dyer, Super- 
visor of Publications at the Co llege, I'rof. 

Laurence It '.rose, I'rof. Frank Prentice 

Rand, and Other members of the faculty. 
Many selections have been turned in 
from time to time and carefully discussed. 
The creative writing of this group has 
been so successful this year that prepara- 
tions are now being made for a collection 
of material for the next issue, which un- 
doubtedly will apjx-ar at a later date 
this term. It is not too late to submit 
work and it is hoped that any of the 
undergraduates interested in this phase 
of creative writing will get in touch with 
Professor Rand or Kclward A. Connell '27. 



riu- Mass, Aggie basketball quintal 
went on a rampage against Northeastern 
last Saturday night at Boston and <»ut- 
played the Bai k Baj team b) i score <»f 

■'<•> !<> 17, I'lle Agate-, rOSS lo s'leatcr 
heights than at am time previoual) dur- 
ing the season, astonished I huge crowd 

"i i ins who packed the Beaton "Y", and 

gratified s large i il i Aggie alumni 

from Greater Boston who attended the 
encounti r. 

Mm- Northeastern quintet started with 

a rush and amassed ten |Hiinls while the- 

visitors were scoring three cm a double- 
decker by "Biondie" Thomas and ■ (ran 

H\ b) "Raj " I .nllin. Then it was that 

the Vates in oke- loos, and ov er whelmed 
the Beantownera with a passing attack 

that was worthy of this year's slogan — 
"( i«t the hall and keep it!" I oi piaeti- 

call) thirty minutes the Aggi«s> held swny, 
restricting the Northeastern h\c to a 

me.igei ti\e points. The standing at half 
time was lit to Ul in la\or ol the Agates. 

The deliberate passing ol the- Maroon 
and While pud puz/.led the home leaiu, 
which could not formulate a successful 
defense, anel which was unable to pene- 
tiate the- Aggie- live in. in barrier. The 
Northeastern team was a pre game 
favorite around boston, having defeated 
Tufts b\ over 20 OoftttU, and having lost 
to ILL. by only two counters. 

"Itlondii •" I hernias was high scorer of 
the contest with thirteen |»oints to his 
credit, and the M.A.C. center also out- 

jumped his op|Mineiit, Kobera. "Ray" 
i.ullin was mentioned by the boston 
paaetl as the last, s| man on the Moor, 
while "Line" Murdough played a sterling 
defensive gamp. It la also significant that 
Captain "I'art" I'artenhcimcr has more 
assists to his credit than any other niein- 
ket of tin- sepiael. "Roly" Reed also did 
his rfiare in helping the quintet to work 
as a unit. Knlm.i was high scorer for hit* 
team, while Captain Ralfonc, starting at 
guard, was injured and hue eel to retire 
Irom the game. 

The closing minutes win marked by 
the- procession of subs to ihe scorers. 
Several Irishmen from Northeastern, and 
several Aggie- second siring men gelling 

into the contest . 

c ...niiiiii. .1 ,,n Page I 



Puxters Lose 

to Hamilton, 2- 1 

Swan Scores Aggies' Cioal. Forest 
and Abrahamson Injured. 

Hamilton forced the Aggie- puckatara 
to .11 1 e pt a 2 tc, i defeat at Clinton, N.Y.. 

last Saturday, in I fast game- pl a yed on 
excellent ice. The Hamilton eombin 
ation had a slight advantage ovei the 
Agates in skating and shooting, but I he- 
Be) Staters excelled in passing and 
teamwork. 
Neither sextet scored in the opening 

session, DUt I lamilton pushed the- pu< k 
into the- cage- twice in SUCCCSS'lOn in thc- 

second period. T D« ■ Aggies reciprocated 

in the- third with one- si ore when "Due ky" 

Swan tallied on a rebound. Moth Hamilton 

SCOrea Wire excellent shots, one from the- 
center, and the other a long one- from an 

angle. The last period saw the visitor-, 
at their beat, but the bnaks wen- un- 
favorable, 
Galanie at goal made- f req u ent stops, 

while ScOVal "I Hamilton also weal hereej 

many a storm, bald featured at center. 
"Abe" Abrsharneon re ceiv ed an injury to 

his knee, while < aptain "Joe" I oi • 

suffered a painful injury to his lip when 

hit by a high stick, both men should In- 
ill shape for the Maine trip. 'Ihe Agates 
are more fortunate- this year in having an 
extra pair of wings who e an be substi- 
tuted at intervals te. Speed up the- offense. 

The lineup: 

Maaa. AlSlce Hamilton 

Freae, c c. Bald 

Sw.n. rw lw. Browne 

Passat, lw rw. inu.iiu 

Abr.ihamiion.rcl W. Beareitley 

Harwell, WI rd, McLean 

Gssnasea. s s. Sasvei 

Ban*; Hamilton — Brown, ileyl. Baker, Schnei- 
der. Montgomery. M.A.C— Nash. Cook. Referee 
Ni.holioi Wert Point. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26, 1927 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN | 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Punished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



hoard OF EDITORS 



William L. Dolk "27 

EBMMI 1- Sl'KMKK IS 



iMlitot-in-Chicf 
Managing BsUttt 



2s 
'38 

•2s 

'2K 
'151 1 

•30 

•2«» 
'28 
•27 



DIl'AKTMKNT BDITOBS 

Editori.i William L. Dow ; 

Athletics K**" *J ,A, ' K H 

llliWAWi \V. 11IM1.K 

C»mpui News i.knkm 

Ellsworth Baknakh 

JnllS 15. H«>W.\KI» JK. 

Ban BmotnoM 

Faulty fcShoit CtMfSSS Ki.WAKnH.Nu..-.- 
Intercdlegiate Kditor £"^ , -*"£ 

Personal, K.litor Frances C. Bruce 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

it r, Km "11 Business Manager 

9 HARLE 5 w« takfr T 27 Advertising Manag* 

^%"wmTE A -27 R Circulation Manner 

Douglas W. Loring '28 

Ei>win A. Wilder 28 

llAKuii. K. Ansei.l 29 

Lawrence A. C*w«thM 

William A. Kcan 29 

Fumuck D. Tiiaykr. Jr. <« 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sing e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
bribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the An herst 
Post Office. Accepted Jot ma.l-.ng at spe a! rat e 
of pUtage provided (or in section 1 103 Act of Oc 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. l»i». 



CO-OPERATION 
1 asi wtik w. made ■ conuneat whit h 

aroused much iceliii K '» *• ,;l » ks ,,f {h " 
Two-Year nun. During the fall, we 
covertly censured a gTOUp "I nun un- 
certain obnoxious practices, an.l s.nee- ■ 

had bo effect, we cApnswd ovnehva more 

bluntly in a further effort to Stop the* 
practices. This is our story. 1 here is, 
however, one phase of the prrsent ettua- 

tion which is, perhaps, a point iatavorol 

the victims of our remarks. 1 he Short 
Course men are existing umlcr a "lax- 
ation without Keprest ntation" scheme of 
things. They have no voice in the arm.- 

ties of the Senate, Addphia, or the 
Collegian. Seace the CWfftaa stands t<>r 

the beet DOMthle MA.C, however, we 
cannot rtinsriou-lv overlook malprac- 
tices whicfc mar the name and i.ai.iv o\ 
our college; even though it bt ahackled 
ones who are at fault. Bttl the afcuatktt 
is one which is not COmpatihk with a 
democratic college in a democratic coun- 
try, and it therefore lays itself open to 
correction. 

Then are certain I norrnOUi difficulties 
in adding to our Senate. Adelphia, and 
college paper men from the short course. 

Such a solution is highly impractical. But 
both Four-Year and Two-Year men have 
student executive organiearioas which 

are functioning well within their OWB 

fields. They could easily become a bridge 
between the two. Each group will always 

have some fault to Bttd with the other 

as long as they remain together. It cer- 
tainly would be practical and helpful in 
maintaining a wholesome atmosphere, to 
provide for a joint meeting <>f the Collegi 
Senate and the Two-Year Student Coun- 
cil. At such a meeting controversies 

bet w i en the two groups could he thorough- 
ly investigated, each organization would 
|>e prepared to present to the other 
reports of infraction of Mast 

principles and traditions, and ideas 
could be exchanged lor the mutual bene- 
fit of both. For example, this matter of 
hanging around the Dining Hall could 
have been emphasized l>y the Senate at 
uuh meeting ami the Two-Yeai Council, 
realizing how strongly their neighbors 
felt about the situation, would probablj 
have taken even more pains than they 
have to stop it. Moreover, the question 
need never have come to public attention. 
thus avoiding a certain amount of ill 
feeling, unavoidable and antie ipated undo 
the pie sent rircun. stances. 

Recent events have disclosed an un- 
desirable situation. Let us remedy it as 
best WC can. Certainly this is a question 
for the Student Forum, and a serious one 
which deserves considerable thought. We 
submit our solution with a tirni convic- 
tion that it is practical and that it will 
be an improvement over our present 
practice. We await comments construc- 
tive and otherwise. 



LOITERING 

Let us .igaiu refer to loitering around 
the Dining Hall. One problem which 
(aces the Two-Yaw Student Council, is 
where to s,nd the loiterers when the walk 
in front of the Dining Hall is declared 
taboo. This is a problem which fa< c- 
everyoaC at M.AC. There are many ot 
us who have one o'< lock (lasses in Stoek 
bridge Hall or in the (hem l.ab. What 
to do with ourselves for thirty minutes 
is a problem. Smoking is not allowed in 
the Dining Hall, and Usides there is not 
room for many to sit around long after 
dinner. Smoking is forbidden in Stoek- 
b.idge Hall. Hut why? We have neve, 
discovered. It is silly to send the inveter- 
ate smokers out onto the old steps be- 
tween classes. It cannot Ik- that there is 
a saving in labor for the steps have to In- 
swept several times a day in order to keep 
them half presentable. An edict went 
out last year to the effect that students 
should refrain from throwing cigarette 
butts on the steps. But where are they 
going to throw them. Perhaps ash trays 
could Ik- hung around the pillars. Again, 
if the situation is bad in front of the 
Dining Hall, we can think of no adjective 
to describe the situation on Stockbridge 
steps between classes. Those who arc- 
used to crowded subways are the only 
ones who come here with an adequate- 
background to successfully enter the 

building. 

The men's locker room is an ideal place 
to smoke. Ask the few daring ones who 
have tried. A smoking room was provided 
for the High School teachers who assem- 
bled here last spring. The authorities 
knew that these men would not pal up 
with any undergraduate rules as Salty M 
this one. If there is some good reason for 
prohibiting smoking in this fire proof room 
in Stockbridge, we have yet to find it. 
Why not be sensible and turn this into a 
loitering room to which the crowds which 
normally block progress to and from our 
buildings may go. It will improve the 

appearance of the front of our buildings 
immensely. 



PERSONALS 



FACULTY NOTES 



~i 



GIRLS GIVE FIRST 

CONCERT OF SEASON 



THE MA SSACIIUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JAN. 26. 1927 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

How many have started to write a SOWg 
for the Alumni Song Writing Contest? 

* • * 
Although there was no MMWahOf hike 

to Mount Toby last Saturday, then- waa 

a hike. 

* * * 

A group of undergraduates have been 
Organiaed into a Press Club. Perhaps 
you will get your name in the home 

paper, now. 

* * * 

A- initiations get under way, t he 

faculty may observe days when fraternity 

brothers stick together in being unpre- 

pareel. 

* * * 

I'nthusiasm tor winter sports h.. n 
reive el a set back as a result of our Lon- 
don weather. No., the warm weather 
enthusiasts are- having their day. Thc-\ 
may now take- hear) for a while longer. 

* * * 
The competitors tot song leader re- 
ceived much better support last Friday 
night than competitors have lor several 
years. Evidently Prexy's talk- on toler- 
ance are sinking in. 

* * * 

The M.A.C. activities broadcasts from 
Wl'./.i.c apparently worth while. Several 
notes of commendation have come to 
those who have already been en the air. 
Moreover, it i- good experience to. some 
of our future- agriculturalists, 

* » * 

Although our remarks last week in 

connection with the short course men 

Were applicable to a few. they should not 
have been taken as referring to the entire 
group. Since many have taken exception 

to our remarks, we take this opportunity 

to clarify our state ment. 



K. J. Kowen 91 visited the campus 
during the holidays. He is engaged in 
landscape work with the I'arr Nurse-tie- 
of Wvon.issing, Pa. 

P 

buddy Frost '--1 has gone to Man- 
hattan, Kansas, to till a temporary en- 
gagement as instructor in landscape- 
gardening. 

Don Savage should turn pro after 
appearing all winter with the musical 
dubs. His whatsit is one of the most 
popular feat tires of the < dee Club concerts. 
Of course, the elancing afterward rates 
big with the Clttfa itself. 

We have heard about one man orches- 
tras, but we never saw one until Ira Hates 
unaided played for a dance at the Alpha 
Gamma Rho house. 

P 

Ken Perry is back at the Aggie Inn 
after s|K-nding a few days at the Infirmary. 

P 

Midge Huss is bach at the Abbey after 
sending a few davs at the Infirmary. 

p 

Bloody Mills enjoys meets like the 
K. of C. meet U-cause he knows the 
ropes. One might almost call him a 
professional gate crasher, when he is on 
home ground. 

Kobley Nash was epiite elated to return 
from the hockey trip and find that his 
room and his books we-re epiarantineel. 
P 

Ask Ken Rich how much his board bill 

is now. 

P 

Ted ('.rant 'lib is on a banana planta- 
tion in Honduras. 

P 

Mac Cummings had the first touch of 
spring lever to appear <>» campus, lie 
nonchalantly sat on the fraternity front 
parch and read a book while waiting .en- 
tile- Tooncrvillc. We- would also state 
that the title- ot the book was the "Mag- 
nificent Idler". 

1> 



Miss l.orian P. Jefferson, Assistant 
Professor of Agricultural Keonomie s, 
■poto before the New Hampshire State 
Horticultural Society, in Concord, N.H., 
on Jan. IS, on the Lxi>ort Apple Market. 
She also addressed, on January 19, the 
Worcester league of Women Yote-rs. 



Girls' Glee Club Makes its Debut 
at Cushman. 



Profc-sor J. II. Fraadaaa was the re- 
cipient, last week, of a U-autiful gold 
watch engraceel "To J. H. Frandsen from 
Nebraska friends". This gift was pre- 
■ic atari to him by me mba ra of the dairy 
and co-operative- association of the state 
as a token of appreciation for services 
rendered by Mr. Frandsen in furthering 
co-operative work in Nebraska while he 
was connected with the University of Ne- 
braska, and later as Counselor and dairy 
editor of the Capper Farm Publications. 

Professor Frandsen was invited to 
come to Lincoln to be the honorary guest 
at a banquet held in connection with the 
Nebraska 1'nion Agricultural meetings 
the first week in January, but he did not 
feel he could leave his duties here to 
make the trip at that time. 



Mr. Paul W. Yiets has just returned 
from New York where he has been 
attending a large meeting of the college 
IH-rsonncl directors from colleges all over 
the country. 



The announcement has been made by 
the Kappa Kpsilon fraternity of the 
pledging of Prof. C.rant B. Snyder. 



MILITARY NOTES 



Tony Joyce fx'UT is working as a 
draftsman in Providence, R. I. 
P 

Parker Kyan patronized the- Two Veal 
dam.- last Fridaj night. 

— p — 

blladora Huthsteine-r has returned Iron. 
bet home- in Pit 1 sti.lel, where she was 
eonhcel with the mumps. 
P 

Tom ( ampionex'JSi- studying forest n- 

at the Michigan Agricultural College. 

P 

Chilely Morey, .l"e Forest, Stretch 
McVey and Hans Batnngartner are at 

the Infirmary. 

p 



Ever amce Sergeant Cronk came to 
this College he has had a reputation for 
speed in carrying out duties. He lieat his 
own record last week, however, and this 
his ow he did it. On Sunday he- received 
his discharge; on Monday morning he re- 
e nlisted; and that same afternoon he got 
married. A remarkable feat, no matter 

which way it i- looked at. 



Mure- has been SO much rifle shooting 
s <»inK on at the rifle range that Private 
Murray has been brought up from the 
stable to help out with the instruction. 



Robert Cooke 'l'."- is the manager 



The result of the match with Cincinnati 

hut week was: Cincinnati 9662, M.A.f 
3183. The- match this week i- with 
Culver Military Academy. Indiana. 



As a re -ult of the meeting of the rifle 
team last Wednesday, MeKitlriek was 
elected captain. No manager was chosen 
because the team decided that it di.ln't 
need one as long a- the Military Office 
was in charge. 



One of the traditions at Medland 
University, Fremont, Nebraska, is a 
night shirt parade prior to the opening 
football game of the season 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 






Basketball 




Wesleyr.n 


43 Trinity 


13 


Williams 


M VYesleyan 


33 


West Point 


24 Lehigh 
Hockey 


.,•> 


Springfield 


$ Amherst 


1 


Yak 


7 ILL. 


1 


Bates 


6 Bowdoin 


,.' 



ot 
the- Richmond Hills Farm near I'itt-lield. 
P 

John Lord is the manager ol the Lord 

Poultry Farm-. Methuetl, Mass. 

P 

I "acidic Poey '25 and Stanley Hurt '2b 
are- engaged in a market gardening enter- 
prise near Havana, Cuba. 

'' ■■ I 

Eddie Rowen '28 is engaged in land- 
scape gardening work with the I'arr 
Nurseries oi Weiser Park, Womekdorf, 

Pa. He- visited the campus during I he- 
Christmas vacati. n. 

P 

Bill Budgi '28 is doing research work in 
dairying and is teaching part time at 

l'eiin State. 

Joe Cormier '_•'. is now studying land- 
scape architecture at our Harvard branch. 
One of the big annual events at Harvard 
is the Toparian Club competition. The 
competition is Stiff going and first year 
men Seldom try. But Joe tried, the "old 
Aggie spirit", and in a field of thirty-one 
competitors, mostly second and third 
year men. he tied for second place. The 
program ealle .1 for the- design of a munici- 
pal amusement park, twelve- acres in ex- 
tent, located on Cape Cod. Congratula- 
tions, Joe! 



The instruments required for a full 28- 
ptece band have been sent for and it i- 
thought that they will arrive soon. There 
i- -till a chance lor more bandsmen, and 
men are encouraged t<> give it a try. 



WITH THE ALVMNI 



The (iirls' < ilc-e- Club made its debut ol 
the- Seaaoa in Cushman Ix-fore an app 
eiatixe audience, on Tuesday evening 
January IS, at H o'clock. This i> the 
second concert which the club has ; 
sente-d in Cushman. The girls left the 
Abbey in sleighs and automobiles at about 
7 o'clock and arrived a few minutes before 
the time scheduled for the In-ginning .,| 
the iK-rformance. 

besides the regular (dee Club sake. 
tions, the program contained numlx-rs by 
the double trio and by individual mem- 
bers of the club. "The Big Brown bear", 
sung by the double trio, carried the house- 
and was the hit of the evening. The Dank 
and fright of the little girl who conn. 
upon a big brown Ix-ar was so well pic- 
tured and acted that lioth the audieiue 
and the performers were convulsed in 
laughter In-fore the piece was over. 

The program l>egan with "Aggie M\ 
Aggie" and ended with the Alma Mater. 
starting the new precedent for the club 
of singing college songs at the beginning 
and at the end of the |>erforinance, which 
the girls think is worth-while establishing. 
The numbers on the program by the 
individual members of the club were well 
received and encored. Readings were 
presented by Dorothea Williams '2K, and 
by Margaret Donovan '30. Miss Williams 
presented "My Wife's Husband", a 
sketch whit h presents the trials of a yoeafl, 
husband who determines to Ikjss his 
wife; and Miss Donovan gave a clever 
little hit entitled "My Favorite S|x>rt ". 
Faith Packard '29 and Kathryn Knixht 
'HO played piaao solos which were- duly 

a pp re ci ated The only costumed Dumber 

on the program was an Irish jig danced 
by Marjorie Pratt and Josephine- I'an/ii .., 
both of the class of '28. 

Mrs. A. B. Beaumont, the coach of the- 
club directed the singing in place si 
Miriam lluss '29, the leader who u.i- 
unfortunattly unable to Ik pre s ent at th. 
first e eiiuert of the season. 

The program p r e sent ed follow-: 
I Agii.e My Auuie 

Tlieie- IsaCcKl 'in \ ..IVy 

My Marguerites I mnkt //.jrim. 

e ,!. . (tub 
'1 1..1 'ut.teT Town 

Pros* um i .inn >t Dm sty Km \ 

I ! . . i on die TWif Ot UM Chi 

I )oi:lile Tiio 
:: A K-M.t.ui. Ml Win'- HSMBHMsd 
Mian Poerot h e a \\ UUam 

I. An A, I llu- lii-li Jt| 

Mlaaca Marioeric PraU ■*"<'* Jwwt'Slw I'> 
:.. In My Nrighbor'a GaieSta 

Miaa Faith Packard 

.; Annoy.!,- 

The South W Y-t Wind /- " ""' 

Mound H"- Gypaj R« r ' r "'" 

' lub 

7 My Teesde Setas* WonH H<- Ftytac 
The Hie Bream Bt 

i ) rabtc Ti i" 

v Starry Night ■<'."•■"' 

Miss Kathryn Knithi 
B, A K.-.iiliiut— My h;<v<>nt«- BBOtl 

\!i„ DottwvM 

to Autumn Storms 
When Twilight Saaoowi DtsQ es 

Alma Ml 

I lub 



Plans for a mammoth alumni pow-wow 
for Aggie graduates residing in the 
eastern part of the State will be formulated 
at i inciting of ■ special alumni com- 
mittee, including the ofikers ol the M..V 
C. Alumni Club of Greater Boston. This 
preliminary meeting will In- held at the 
University Club. Boston, Thursday- eve- 
ning, January 27. where it is expected 
that about lit/ten alumni will gather. A- 
a result of this meeting, it is hoped that 
arrangements may be made to hold the 

greater alumni gathering about the 

middle of February. 
The present officers of the M.A.C. Club 

of Greater Boston and those who will 
direct the arrangements for the gathering 
are: Edward C. Edwards '14, president; 
Howard M. Colt l'.t. secretary; and 
Frank A. Anderson '18, treasurer. 



Two-Years Hold 
Mass Meeting 



Short Course Men Protest Against 
Editorial Comment. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

The athletic- department of the CeOegian 

wishes to state that the score of the game- 
bet wee n Delta Phi Alpha and the non 
fraternity team was misprinted in last 
week's Collegian. The score should have 
been D.PA. '.». N.F. 8 instead of the score- 
that was printed. 



CLASS MEETING 

As a result of the class meeting held 
last Wednesday by the Freshman class 
to complete the election of officers the 
following have been elected to serve: 

Miss May F. Buckler of Pittsfield, 
secretary; and Farle L. Morawski of 
Attleboro, sergeant -at-arms. 



President Edward M. lewis, and 

Arthur W. Gilbert '04 Commissioner of 
Agriculture for Massachusetts, yvill bt 
the speakers at the New York Alumni 
banquet which will be held in the Fra- 
ternity Clubs Building on 38th Street 
and Madison Avenue, New York City. 
All Aggie men within reach and members 
of the M.A.C. Club of New York City 
are invited. Several novelties and siunts 
are planned. 



Frederick A. Hollis '28, of Charlton, 
who worked in Hartford, Conn., expired 
Sunday, January 16. 



The entire Two-Year student 

gathered in Bowker Auditorium !»•' 
Thursday afternoon to voice a 

n-i a statement which apnea 1 in 
the columns of the- CotUpan ksl 
The meeting was called by the Two-^ 

Student Council. The session « 
for <i while but the calm minds finall] 
won out and a disc u-sion ensued WWCS 
involves the position of the < 
among the Iwo-Year group at 
relation of the entire- group to the I 
as a whole. 

The Council proved its authorit 
value by citing several activities whk* 

hay.- been sponsored by it unknown to 
most of the short course men. r ° r 
example, they have long been 
on the problem of disiH-rsing the i ro«* 
which gather in front of the Dining Haft 
More-over, they presented an at" 1 

between the Collegian and thenwebe 

which has been pending for some : '"»' 
The agreement provides for to 
Two-Year Personals, which will 
in the Collegian for the first tin 

week. i 

The body of the discussion o < lU ' r, ' { 
around the public censure to which I l > 
(Continued on Page *< 



rtICKEY*FREE/VlAN SuitS reveal rare, rich colorings of the Scotch Moors. We personally select them, as representative of the weaves 
and colors preferred by London's best dressed men. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



DNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



1WO-YKARS IIOI.I) 

iContlnuixl from Putt- .' 

had been subjected. Several conclusions 

resulted. First, the- ceaeure was mi 

justified because it see nice I to apply to 
tin whole group rather than to a lew 
delinquents. Second) then- is a real 

problem involved, namely, th.it there i- 
no place in which to smoke- and loiter 
let ween dinner and a one o'clock" cl.i— . 

therefore the nun are- forced over to 
Stockbridge, where tin it presence is 
equally unwelcome. No definite action 

Wat taken except to refer the- matter to 
the- Student Council which has a meeting 
tonight. 



BOSTON UNIV. BOWS 

e on l lie lied from I'ufte I) 

The second half was mile h more hotly 
contested and much faster than the first 
period. During this period the visit ens 

made a determined drive for a victory but 

the Aggie's lead and superb defense ele 
leated this gallant attempt. The Agate - 



BIG SALE 
COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES ON BOTH 
BLACK AND TAN COLLEGE OXFORDS. 
COME IN AND SEE THEM . 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 




When YouSlow Up 

When natural forces fail, the 
yachtsman depends on motor 
power to carry him on. 

When strength declines with 
age, and earning power de- 
creases, our Life Income Plan 
will carry you along. It v/ill 
pay you $100 a month for life 
after age 65, or earlier if dis- 
abled. 

The same contract will pay 
your family $10,000 if you die 
young. 

Send for descriptive booklet, 
"Pension Yourself". 

Connecticut General 
Life InsuranceCompany 



not only defended iheit own basket, but 
also managed to keep on e-yen terms with 
tin it opponents, Uith teams getting nine 
points. The final score waa M.AC. 10, 
B.I . 12. 

I In Ai^ie- quintet presented a more 
finished appearance than at tbeu last 
home game. "Ray" Griffin's speed) t<»>i 

Work and his excellent passing and 

"Link" Murdough's guarding were ea 
pecially commendable. Cohen starred foi 

the losers, 

I In- summary; 

Unas. AftUit-M ItoMlonl'nti. 

ti I- p. B i f 

i<"'i n i o ■-• AuKiist. re o it 

rompUas, it ci o »> larttatt, ll ■> u 

Grifta, rl -j | t; e otter, , i t :t 

N.csh, rf ll o (i ci 'BriBtt, it 1 I :l 

l bomaa, . 2 4 1 sfcssw it 12 1 

Miirili.iiKh. Ill 1 •_' 

I'.iii liinmt. rl> "J 1 "i 

K.n'r. rli el 

Tots] I HI Totals I I l'J 

Raftru stii-.i. Timet 10 inimiii- period 
Boon .it half tin:. M A C III. H.(t. ;i. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

I PLEASANT STREET, (up om Sight) 

OculUta Prr« rip t loan ¥ Iliad Broken lento. 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While V Walt 
NK.v\ PRICES 
Mfn'» Whole- Soles. Rubber Hee-I* ■ • ■ SJ.5.1 
Mfn'i Half Sole*. Rubber Hrrla - - . I.7S 
Mm'* KiiIiIht Soles. Rubber lleeU • - i.» 
Menu Half Solee Ill 

Work Guaranteed -< mux i ..i Plaaaaal ami 
Amity BO. Open till K P. M 



You will And an eireltant 

. . . SIIOK REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goody far 
Mai liim i > unci a no. ili-iii 

SHOE SIIININC P A K I OR 
ue II) Amlly-Se . • Opp. New Theatre 

II V unJn lutitl ynur rrqutrrmtnli and ait prt- 
I'urrd li' mrtl *MSf nrr . 
All work liutiriinitnl Shuts ihtntii anil tlytd. 60, 

VINCENT CRANDONICO. Prop. 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 27.', Tel. (".reenficld lKT.'i M 

Greenfield, Mass. 



VALENTINES 



including many 

NOVELTY BOXES 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wad. 

Thurs. 

M ATI Ml 

.too. 

ONK^SIIOW 
AT NIGHT 

7.. to 



Friday 

t.INI 
Mt. N..»0 



Saturday 
t oo 

«.4.4 s to 



MpeChUI S|M'. i.el! S|i,., I. il> 
I ltll.ni GUt), Ji.lui C.lll.ir I 

iii I \ Iteini \tf •• n». ri . 
Is I In- Hiuitlir million pU- 
lurr i f m i ct-ii liKlor) Ton 
bill stare, dim oil b) the 
in. in u In, mail i- ■ I In- llltl 
Pafatfs." A Mm of etejuia- 
lii- lu-.iiit) lh.il Stirs thee 
.in iii liinv , ami touches the 
ll III il I'll riai lii-s i if tin In-art. 
V\ilh Kin in- Aelorrr. Koy 
I)' \n>. t.i'orue llinmell ami 

Edward Ever at I Hartoa. 

Vi'Wn I- allies 1 i I'i'lt uiiiisjI\ 
Mat. Chid. III. AduIlN ISC 
I *a. llnor .tSe lliil 4«k- 



Caarad Naaat, idithKoh- 
arts aad Gaoras fawcett In 
iiluuithlniiiomtHly "THERE 
Mil ABE." I li.' hllarlouii 
caraat efawbtte-ccollarclarti 

who Hlarla out to Start 
seimethlnii and dues \ 
niltture of lo\ e ami laugh* 
Spot I llih t Cnniedy 



t.lKMSIKR tip III! 
MOUNTEO." Mounled po- 
lice utory Nlurrlnit Lefty 

I Imiii I ifi> III tin Is inn- 
Itenliilly ease In the title 
role, and the action shows 
hint us lielini ahle.l by Jack 
and I li/. id. ill when he Is 
esh.insii-il Late*-, Is sent to 
llet this pair for meireli-r 
News i reel t aimed) 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Skates sharpened by former lee-Skate Ha. 
Inft Men with twenty Winter's experience. 
Believe us It makes a different e. 

Only one of many Items In SAKE. SI'I I m 
SERVICE at 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMIIKKST RANE 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

I irsi houae ^.inli d campua. 
Telephone 511 



SPECIAL SALE ! 



EVERYTHING AT DISCOUNT. 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



EVERYBODY HAS A SWEETHEART 

OUR VALENTINES are ready 
All Kinds 



To Get the Best, Buy 

"Ml NSINGWEAR" RAYON 
and SILK 

Hloomers — Step-ins Vests 
Comhinations 



SOLD I XCI.l SIVKI.Y »V 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 
M.A.C. STATIONERY- OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Order your Tuxedo early for Fraternity banquets. 

A new and complete stock or Tuxedo shirts, ties and accessories on hand. Rtmen.ber we are selling suits ami overcoats at close tut price*, 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



— JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Fiest in Drug Store Service 
HFNRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



SING LEF HANPLAUNPRY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mavaa 

Our ..aiindry First Class 

Our Palicy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AM) Al.l. KINDS OF 
WASHING DON! AT KKASONAIH.r 
PRICKS 

Opposite Post Office 



SPECIAL SALE 

TO mi \<.t,n \n s 

itaa in .mil |ai .1 aalr of Cutlet s ttif arsis esi 

our lirninl iii-m um received rerenlly 

■ 

Shur KrpiilririK Depiirtment 

JOHN IOTOS 
self-si rvu;k MitiK BTOaU 



SOME OF THE EARLY BIRDS have already made their Suit and Topcoat selection for Spring. Have you considered what your selection will be? 
New Shipments of Clothes arriving almost daily. 



EXETER 



CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



HYANNIS 









•Ill- MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 2^1927 



HOOPSTERS SURPR'SE 



. ss YE AGGIE INN 



( annum, d from l*aU» I 

There was a distinctly All-New England 
atmosphere on the Aggie bench, for ■ 
group "t former Aggie basketball lumin- 
m re present to aid "Ray" Smile) 
»26, who was in charge ol the squad, with 
strategic advice, "Eddie" Bike '24, 
• I ,r, ■• |,.n. - '28, and "Johnny" Temple 
-28 were .'II oa deck, "Dead-eye" Kelso 
'•ji'i was also among those present. 

The score: 



SI OKK 
Banners 

Pennants 

Pillow Covers 
Stationery 



Bean Contest 

One Chance for every 25 cent 

purchase (not including 

candy and tobacco 



YE AGGIE INN 

RESTAURANT 

Sunday night lunches our 

Specialty. 
Ice Cream 

Lunches. 



Mass. Aggie 

li. 1-. I' 



NordMMBtsra 

B. I 



Griffin, rf 

Ml I '.Mil, II 

k.Mti. it 
Thotnu, e 
Couko*, c 



1 1 10 



1 | I 

;, | i:i 





I'm lainicr, in 3 •> 

fCana.n 8 " 

Murdouah, Ig " n n 

Nash, la 



.V.ndi. Ig 
K.itloni:, in 

plai Mk< it 
ICol era. i 
rlogsSi c 

Siliini-, ll 

Placxek, li 
Renkcr, rl 
Houie, rl 



ii 

•> 1 

I Q 



P 
li 

6 

n 

■ 

n (i 

ii 3 



o 
i 

ii 

1 
o 



Q 



Total* « ~> : « ''"'• lK 7 

K,i. tree McGuieaaw. Time aO-asUtttte halve* 



juixjinc; TEAMS 

(Continued from page I) 
Foley. As individuals, Milligmn was 17th 
With IIH0 points, C. l'aisons 84th with 

1120 points, and R. Foley -'7th with 1090 
points. The Masaachuaetts team did its 

beat work at the National Dairy Show, 

held at Detroit, where, with T, teams 
competing, M.A.C. placed Nth. Miltigan 
was fourth man in the entire contest, 
while Foley was fourth man in placing »f 

terse) a . 

The Dairy Products Judging team this 
year part ieipalcel in COUteSta at the 
Eastern States and at the National Dairy 
Show. At Easter* States the Massachu- 
setts team tied for first place in the 
judging of fo] cream and stood third in 
the judging of milk, third in judging of 
cheese, and fourth in the judging of 
butter. In judging all products, the 
team stood third. R. C. Foley was high 
man at Eastern States, winning fourth 
place in the contest. At the National 



Dairy Show, 13 nam- competing, Ma 
chusetta stood 1 Ith. The) wen- Oth in 
the judging ol ice cream, 8th in the judg- 
ing oi milk, and 10th in the judging <>i 
butter. Foley » : " high man oa 

il,. team. 

In the Livestock Judging conti »t held 
in Chicago in connection with the Inter- 
national Livestock Exposition, with 83 
teams competing, 1- D. Rhoades was 
high man on the Massachusetti team. 
The membership ol the team was as 
follows: L. D. Rhoades, Ella Buckler, 
k. C. Foley, I.. II. Black, J. W. Parsons. 
The Fruit Judging team made only 
one trip la-t term, participating in a 
fruit judging contest at ('.rand Rapids, 
Michigan. The team, the memberi of 
which were W. G. Amstein, C. 0. Cart- 
wright, and Frank Boden, was awarded 

fifth place. While in Michigan, the men 

called on former President Hut terlield. 

The Poultry Judging team also made 
but one trip, taking part in the National 

Intercollegiate Poultry Judging Contest 
held at Madison Square Garden, Jan. 7. 
1927. The following men were on the 
MAC. team, which placed fifth: J. 1- 
Greenaway, G. E. Beams, C. P. Udaa, 
and W. J. Tufts. 

The Floriculture team has not made 
any trips, plans for a contest at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, which was to have been held 
this winter, having failed to materialize. 
The team will probably make a trip to 
Boston early in the spring term. 



with chlorophyll, manufactured in the 
spring and decomposed later in the fall, 
so it is with faith, asserted the speaker. 

lie said that there .ire limes when faith, 
no matter how strong, will waver and 

■eem to disappear only to come back 
later with renewed vigor in tin- same wa) 

that the color Of the plant returns. The 

speaker also drew a comparison between 

the appealing way in which trees stretch 

their branches towards Heaven, and the 

manner in which man's SOttl seems to 
reach out to the Divine. 

Dr. Coffin stated that man's material 

resources have increased out of all pro- 

|x>rtion to his spiritual resources, and 
pointed out the necessity of his faith re- 
Dewing it-ell SO that it might bring the 

Almighty nearer, thua striking a I dance. 



(Of both teams, having eleven point- to 

his credit. The summary: 

Mass. \ttftie tfesi MM 

li i P »■ F. 1' 



Griffin, rl 


3 


q 


- 


Ben; oa, rf 


1 


1 


:< 


Read, ii 




1 


1 


/iininciiiian. ll 




fj 


6 


Thomas, c 


u 


1 


I 


■ i . i 


.', 


l 


i 


Part nebaer, rg 


-I 


:i 


11 


Stiii kli-i. r)i 


1 





■ 


Murdougb, la 


n 








Mil oy. la 








i) 


Coukoa, i 


o 





II 


Draper, u 


I 


1 


'.I 


McEwen, rf 





Q 


u 


Mills. If 


■_> 


1 


B 


Tompkins, it 


n 


ii 





Scrlll.111, C 


n 


ii 













Wil-oii, ru 








o 










I'l 1. In 


I 





a 










DrcinHwaH. In 








ii 










Hutcbinaoa, e 


i 


II 


a 




— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


To! 


7 


• ii 


24 


Tot 


18 


1 


36 


[UCercc Hastings. 


Time — 20-miBUte halves. 






AGGIE DEFEATED 

Continued from I'age 1 

Captain Parteaheimer was high scorer 



There is at Dartmouth an athlete who, 
even though handicap|>ed with but one 
leg, is a consistent exponent of the high 
jump. His best effort thus far has been 
G feet 1 inch. 



WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



DR. GOFFIN SPEAKS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

characteristic color, faith is the connec- 
tive between man and Heaven. As it is 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakea, Freah Fruits, Refreahmenta and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tllford, Boxea Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

the place for the college man" 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 




[Mothen viiit die club-house] 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Camel attracts the quality smoker 

CAREFUL observation will reveal Domestic toDaccos grown. In a ciga- 
that men of quality demand quality rette,as in the smoker,there is noth- 
in a cigarette — smoke Camels. A ing that can substitute for quality. 
Camel smoker goes straight to the If VO u want to know what ex- 
point in cigarettes and demands perienced smokers like, just try 
enjoyment. Camels. Each year new millions try 
For there* are no better tobaccos them all and find in Camels enjoy- 
or blending than you get in Camels, ment realized. Camels never tire 
There is no other cigarette taste the taste. To test the quality of 
and fragrance that can compare Camels, compare them with any 
with Camels, because they are cigarette made regardless of price, 
rolled of the choicest Turkish and "Have a Camel!" 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



©1°27 



EVENING CLOTHES 

TUXEDOS AND ALL ACCESSORIES FOR FORMAL WEAR. DOBBS' DERBIES. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



®lti> 4BaBaarbua?tta (Eolbntatt 



Vol. xxxvn. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2, 1927 



Number 15 



Robert Frost, Noted Poet 

Is Speaker at Assembly 

Large Audience Hears Author Read Poetry for Which He 

Is Famous 



At Aaeerabh lael Wedneaday, before a 
large body of visitor* and atudenta, 
Robert Froat, the well-known poet, 
interpreted hi* philosophy ol life, the 

philosophy which is mi well incorporated 

iii most ol In- work. Mr. frost said thai 

it ii his belief that ■ peraoa ahould have 
a definite aim in life; thai ■ p ur poaa b 
absolutely nec ea a ar y (or happ in ess. He 
believe* thai a peraoa with no purpose 
ii inclined t<> be mentally slack, leading 
to certain uehappiness. The speaker 
declared himself deeply int eres ted in 
colleges and college people, and remarked 
humorously that he has almost become 
an authority on what is arrong with our 
colleges, alxiut which he talks when lie 
Cannot read |ioems. Since he holds such 
views, Mr. Frost would naturally bo 

exacted to sympathize with the students 
of a college like Aggie. He declared that 
there is something solid in a school like 
this where students are supposed to have 
a definite purpose in mind, that makes 
him feel quite at home. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



CARTOONIST AND 
SINGER ENTERTAIN 



Collegian Receives 

Gift from Alumnus 



Two New Volumes Added to Collec- 
tion. 



Mr. Newton Shultis '90, who has pre- 
sented to the Collegian several books and 
other literature and who was the largest 
contributor to the Memorial Building 
fund, has recently presented the Collegian 
with two more volumes. One is "The 
Life of Campestris Ulni, the Oldest In- 
habitant of Boston Common", by Joseph 
Henry Curtis. This book is a story of 
the oldest tree on Boston Common, and 
H 1'inoted by Mr. Shultis himself. The 
SMoad volume is a life of Roger Wolcott 
by William Lawrence. Mr. Shultis has 
ttiven the book a personal appeal by 
tilling on the fly leaf of his own Com- 
mencement exercises, at which Mr. 
Wolcott did the honors. 

These books are of such value that 
they will remain in the hands of the 
I'n sident until a safe place can he found 
where they will Ix* made available to t he 
(.WiVgjuw l)oard and others who wish to 
enjoy them. 



DEBATING SEASON 

WILL OPEN SOON 



First Contest With George Washing- 
ton U. on Feb. 17. Freshmen Show 
Much Interest. 



The M.AC student body will have its 
first opportunity to see the debating team 
i" action on Feb. 17, when a debate ia 
lobe held here, with George Washington 
' Diversity as the opponent, on the ques- 
tion, Resolved: that the 1. S. should 
cancel the loans made to the Allies during 

'he war." The college will lie representee! 
by .1 practically veteran team, which 
should Ik- able to hold it- own in this 
debate aa well as in the ones which are 
U> follow. Manager Haskins haa arranged 
'In fallowing schedule. 

February 17 — George Washington 
' Diversity, here. 

March .'5 — University of Vermont, 

there. 

March 4— Middle bury, there. 

M.trch'10— Colby, here. 

Debating has also aroused an unusual 

u&ount of interest among the m emb e rs 

"i the freshman class, as shown by the 

that fifteen of them are now engaged 

activity. A dual contest with 

wifliston will probably be arranged in 
" r 'ler t () oj V( . these would-be orators a 
chance to show their argumentative 
'ofttty. The nanus of those who are out 
or freshman debating are aa follow-: 
">* Rachel Atwood; Carl A. Bergan; 

Mil, <m I. Coven; Arnold M. Davis; 
k "^n I. Hi, key: William E. (Irant; 
Kenneth \V. Hunt; John M. Leonard; 
Rjeodore Marcus; Francis C. Pray; 
^ ilf red (,. Purdy; Arthur B. Sederquist; 
Vnur C. Stanford; Miss Marie E. 
W«Bs, Miss Klizabeth M. Woodin. 



Social Union Entertainment Fea- 
tured by Clever Exhibition of 
Sketching. 



A very pleaailUj and entertaining pro- 
gram ama presented last FHsaaj evening 
in Bowker Auditorium by Mr. Pitt 
Parker, cartoonist, assisted by Miss 
Greta Miles, soprano, and Miss Sybil 
Jane G o u l d , pianist. Thai is not Mr. 
Parker's first ap|>e.ii.ince here as a Social 
I nion entertainer and as usual he put on 
a very clever and iinsiiual performance. 

His program was opened by a group 
ol songs m a d e r ed by Miss Milos, assisted 
at the piano by Miss Gould Mr. Parker 
then began his own particular jwrt of the 
entertainment by making a few fitting 
remarks on the subject of cartooning, 
after which he cpiickly drew a few of the 
liest known characters in the realm of 
cartoons, such as Andy GutttD, 

After creating a group of crayon draw- 
ings, Mr. Parker drew a landscape in 
color which pleased the audience greatly. 
His first l.unl-s.ipe was a picture of the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



THREE BEQUESTS 

MADE TO M.A.C. 



College is Recipient of Substantial 
Gifts. 



During the past few months tin- 
College has been the recipient of three 
new gifts, the income of which is to be 
de\oted to the College <>■ in support of 
its works. These gifts have been donated 
by Charles A. (ileason, Porter I.. Newton, 
and Rear Admiral GeOfgje Holcomb 

Barber. 

Mr. Charles A. <",leason, who died at 
his home in North Brook field, Sept. 29, 
1'.12.-,, left a gift of $'),()00 to Ir- used for 
the College as the Trustees may decree. 
Mr. (ileason, who was a trustee of the 
College up to the time- of his death, has 
served in this position for '.Hi years. 

By the will of the late- Porter I.. New 
ton, a well-known dairyman of Walt ham, 
the College will receive approximately 
*2;i.(KM). The income from this gift will 
be used aa scholarships to aid deserving 
students in gaining an education in 
agriculture at M.A.C. 

The late Rear Admiral George Hol- 
comb Barber, a member of the dasa of 
isx."), has bequeathed the C ollege the 

sum of tff.OOOi Under the terms ol tliis 
bequest the income of the fund will lo- 
used for the- e n co ura gement of general 

athletics among the student bad) M a 
whole, in such a manner as shall be desig- 
nated by the pre si d e nt of the College-. 

Many inquiries have arisen concerning 
the recent attempt to settle the will of 
the late l.otta Crabtree. the noted ait re— 
and philanthropist, Tin- case is still 
under legal and a definite sett lenient may 
not be- made lor several years. The sum 
involved is estimated to be as high as 
«2,00O,fMH) of which only the- income will 
be available to the student-. 



Musical Clubs Give 

Concert at Easthampton 

Largest Audience of Season Well 
Entertained. 



On Friday, the 28th, the Musical Clubs 

gave a concert at Easthampton before an 
audience, the size of which surpassed that 
of all former concert-. It was given under 
the auspice- of the Women's Club, and 
MM held in the spa< ion- Town Hall. The 
members of the dubs entered into t he- 
spirit of the affair with the result that 
many very favorable c omm ents we-re- 
VCJcect Two of the boys in the- (.lee Club, 
who are in feature acts, were in very poor 
physical condition, but, by putting forth 

much effort, p erforme d most creditably, 



CHANGE IN ORDER 

OF PROM EVENTS 



Prom Dance Itself Will Open the 
Festivities. 



At ■ meeting ol the Junior Prom 
Committee last week it was definitely 
decided to re .mange the order ol events 
lor the coining Piom season; therefore 
the program haa been changed slightly 
since ita announcement a tew week- ago. 

The 1928 Junior Prom season will start 
with the Prom Dame itsell rather than 
with the- Prom Show a- in previous \c.ii-. 

The dance will come- on Thursday night, 

April 21, and the- Prom Show, "In the 

Octagon", on Friday evening, April 22. 
Following the show, fraternity house 
dance- will I*- in o*Mer and will continue- 
until ."{ a. m. The program, a> drawn up 
by the committee, has met with the 
approval ol Dean Marhmer. A definite 
announcement will lie made later con- 
cerning the program fbr Baturda) after- 
noon. 

This change- in the program was made 
in order to place more emphasis on the 
Prom Dance itself. In past \ears it has 
been felt t ii.it this main feature has been 
slighted somewhat liecausc of the fact 
that many of the couples are not in the 
mood to enjoy the Prom Dance to the 
uttermost after dancing throughout I be- 
night lx.'fore. 



Bates Game Is 
Scoreless 



Unfavorable Conditions 
Efforts of Well-Matched 



Hamper 
Teams. 



The second meeting between the 
hockey teams of Mass. Aggie and Bates 
last Saturday at the A.S.D. arena at 
Lewiston, resulted in a scoreless tie. 
This contest was played in a pool of 
water and the attack of both teams 
suffered so much because' of the un- 
favorable conditions (hat little team 
play was |x>ssible. 

Bates' fast forwards carried the puck 
to the Agates goal several times but the 
superb work of Calanie saved the day 
for the Maroon and White. Captain 
Lane of the Bates sepiad played a stellar 
game for the home team. The play during 
the two overtime per i od s was a whirl- 
wind affair e-ve-n with the Handicap of 
bad ice. 

The scon-: 
M.A.C. BATKS 

Swan, rw Ivc. LaSM 

N.c-li. I\v rw. White 

Press, g c, Porta 

Abraliatnson. nl Id, Malta 

l-.iiwi-ll. Id i'l. < >-v'<m>'I 

C .alanic. K K. I'alnici 

SbusUtlltei ( iMik tor N.i-cli. I.ini- fur l-arwill 

111 fa i w GeBjr. Gosl)adaei GUbert and Adam 

Turn- ilin-.' I.') and two ft niinuti- periods 



CAMPUS ( MIADAK 



( iiiuifiur fj thf hri^hlrst Rem (if iritvhm 
I >i rm 1 1 . 



Wednesday — 

'.nl's (.!>■<• ( lull ( oniirt: Soutli Deerfield 

'■', 1.". As-i-iiilily: Mr. .|. II WsiSSt Hoty ok c. 
Inte-rtratiinitv basfcsUMtt: 

The-ta (Iii v< Phi SigBM Kappa 

Delta Phi Alpha v- A T (1. 

7l."i (la--. Hockey i 

Mil"! vs. 1MB 1927 v- J. vr-. 

Thursday 

Intrrtratc-rnn y l>a-kc-tt)all : 
K K vs. Q. TV 
A. T. C. vs Noti Fraternity 
7 1 ."> ( ia-s Hockey : 

H127 vs. ! ISSO n 

Friday— 

7..'iOa. in. Insimna ( liaix-l. 

Girl's <,!<■<• (lull ( om.-rt: North Asshctat. 

Maateall lob Concert: Mosam. 

Vanity Hockey: Middli-bury. theft 
Var-ity »a-ki-tball: Williams, here 

Preshsau Basil ilwW Wtada 
Saturday — 
3.00 Informal: Amherst Woaea'i Ctab. 

(>.4.-) Radio Broad<a-t: (.I"- ( lull 'Juartct. 
«i \, in l-ai ulty Dam I, 

Vanity Retayi HAA. l isat, Bo-ton 
Sunday 

1.00 p in Sunday (liai«l-. K"-v K.-nwtli 

( . Mai Arthur, Cambridge, M 

Tui-sil.i) — 

pHnfislniiliy baaketbaO: 

Alpha SiKina I'hi vs. Kappa S| Km; , 
\lpha (.anuria Rho v- Non Fraternity 
Wednesday — 

Inlf-rfratcrnity haski-ttwll: 
K K v- Phi Siictna Kappa 
A T (. fl StfBM Phi g p S B B S 
Two Year haskc-tball: 
Hopkins Academy. kSK 



Overtime Period Gives 

Maine 29-25 Victory 



Visitors lail to Show Best Form on Strange Court. 

Second Defeat of Season 



Receive 



AMHERST VICTOR 
IN ROUGH GAME 

Single Coal is Margin «»f Victory. 
Visitors Frequently Penalized. 



Amherst overcame the Mass. Aggie 
-extc-i b\ a score of I to in a rough-and- 
tumble hockey game on the Aggie Pond 
on January -•"> The Sabrtnaa tallied once 
in tin o|H-ning period, and thenceforth 

the contest was scoreless, but not ilc\cn>l 
of action. 

Captain Cameron drove ths rubber 

into the cage- by I low, will placed shot 
in the first session, which was marked by 
l.i-t pi. i\ and rather rough tactics. < Mu- 
ni Amlii ist's wiiigiiu-n was banished trom 

the ice lor three minutes lor quaatiosasbk 

use ol his stick on < .alanie's head. 

The next two periods saw the Agates 
outplaying their rivals, but despite- fre- 
quent shots by Swan, no MOM was made . 
Both sides rectived numerous fienalties, 
the visitors exceeding in this res|>e-ct. At 
one time in the third period only Captain 
Cameron and goalie Currier were in 
action for Amherst . 

The Amherst leader, Patrick, and 

Currier, at goal, were the outstanding 

Jeffmen, while Swan and Irese flashed on 

the MAC. side. < .alanic- also defended 

(Continued on Pas* 2) 



NEXT INFORMAL TO 

HAVE NEW SETTING 



Only Winter Informal Will Be At 
Amherst Women's Club. 



Tiv Lets for the Informal to In- held 
next Saturday, February . r >, at the Am- 
herst Women's Club on Main Street, arc- 
going rapidly and those who are thinking 
of attending wotdd do well to get in 
touch with some member of the com- 
mittee at once. 

This, besides lie-ing the only Informal 
of the term, will, no doubt, be the only 
one ever to lie held in this spac ious e lub. 

Owing to its use- bv Amherst woman it 

is ditiic tilt to see ure it for a < ollcge dam e. 
Dancing in the Memorial Building is 
always pleasure-able but the novelty ol 
this week's Informal should appeal to 

man) . 

The chaperonea from Smith and Mt 
Holyoke colleges will In- announced later 

in the- week. "Kelilie" llaertl and bis 
( cm| D'Or Band will provide the iiiii-i. . 
and dancing will start promptly at .'i p.m. 



fin- I ui\ ol Maine hoopatei - "\> m - 

came the Agate- bv .1 .".1 tO -•"> count in 

an exciting overtime game pla>ed at 
Orono, Maine, last s.iiiiid.iv , the Inst 
contest in i.dsc- place on the ass armor) 
Boor, The teama nun tied at -- all al 

the regulai end o( the game, .mil t he 

overtime period mu Maine forge ahead 
with a -even point lead before Captain 

I'ai Iciillf imcl scored .1 basket and "R.iv" 
( ii 1II111 a foul. 

lhc home team tallied twice at t lie 

beginning oi the con teat, but "Bbjndie" 
Thomaa countered with two iu-<- tries, 

and "Roly" Kec-cl rang up a double 

deckel. Two more Maine basket- and a 

shot bv Murdougb, along with two single- 

poinl scores, accoiintccl l,,r the u to 7 

lead which Maine held al hall time. 

Griffin tied the score again with one 

of his characteristic CUta alter the opening 
Continued on Paga i) 



Frosh Quintet Wins 

From Greenfield 24-22 



Score ia Tied Several Times During 
last Con teat. 



Two-Year Five Triumphs 
Over Smith Scuoo 



Holland Stars for Winners and Ryan 
for Losers in Low Score Came. 



The Freshman basketball quintet 
emerged victorious over Creenheld High 
last Friday night by a store of 24-22 in a 
fast game played on the < .leenheld Hooi 
Ihe game was an unusually close one, 
the teams being <»n such even terms that 
neither was able to gain more than a 
point or two on theotherat any time. At 
the end of the first period the score stood 
at I -I, the (lose of the first half saw the 
count 11-11, and at the beginning of the 
third |M-iiod the score was still a tie at 
90 tO. During the last iicriod the < ireen- 
tit-Id team gained three points on their 
o|i|x>nents, but the Froah came hack in 
the last three minutes of play with two 
baskets and a foul shot, thus finishing 
the game with a two |>oint lead 

The summary: 



M. A. C 








(.HIIMIIIIi 






it 


K. 


f 




1 F 


t 


Stan i-w-ki. II 


4 


I 


10 


( ouall. rl) 


I 1 


.". 


KII.H. rf 


^ 


1 


• 


\ 1. kil \ . Ih 


1 II 


-' 


( lain-, i 





(l 


<) 


( M hi pin . . 


J 1 


• 


Mallll. Ill 


1 





4 


S.iulil . 


o o 


n 


I'.. ..nan. lit 


ii 








Itonit-ki rf 


4 II 


| 


llui li.ink. rli 


1 


1 


:» 


1' Mnipliy. If 


1 II 


1 


Kaaetaad, ii> 


1 





-' 









I otala 



in I L'l 



[oUll 



III 



n 



Ssor.- at hall t , in. l.i..iilnld II. M A ( . II. 

(Uferea Millsi and Ttnaspsae Tisa MVssas. 
periodi 



HOCKEY TEAM DROPS 
2-0 GAME TO COLBY 



Both Scores Come In Less Than A 
Minute in Second Period of Licit ing 
Contest. 



The Two- Year basketball team de- 
feated Smith Agricultural School 17-10 

last Tuesday night in a sc lose game 
played on the Drill Hall floor. Neither 
team was able to make mm h headway 

during the irat half and the score stood 

at 'h'.i in favor ol Snnlli School at hall 
time. In the last part of the same how- 
ever the Two- Years rallied. Captain 

Holland CUt loose- in the- custom. n v 
brilliant style he has shown this SCOSOW, 
pileing up four baskets ant) two foul 
-hot-. Them, plus a basket apiece- by 
Pe rso na and Olson, lelf t tie vi it..i- 

-H en behind at the close of the contest 
Ryan was the outstanding player for 

Smith School, having eight |x>iiit- to his 
credit. 



The -iimmary: 
TWO-YK.ARS 



SMITH SMIOOI. 



Yarrow, rl 

Otaan, if 

Holland. I 
Butters, ru 

Sti-uart, ri( 
(hue, Ik 



I P 

(I 'I 



1 :« 
I )2 
• I 

ii 

(i o 



Rosen, Ik 

Mi \i ■ 
Peti ' n. xv. 

Oll.ryi h. . 
Ryan. If 

ejuniH . rl 
K.itfa rl 



Totals 

Si or<- at half tmn- 
S. Rrfi-r<-<- An 



I I 1(1 



7 3 17 Total* 

Srriitn School '>, Tv. 
Time -iiiiiiiitr periodi 



The Mass. Aggie sextet dropped the 
tusi game of its Maine trip to < olbv l<\ sj 

1 tO score. The link of the U.iicrvilie 
Hockey (lub was the scene ol tlii- c lean, 

hot K c ontested i ontest. 

All the scoring was done in le-s than a 
miniite ol the second period. Seven 
minutes gJter plav l>eg.in Al I "heil i ul 
loose and hooked the first goal, and less 
tli. hi a minute afterwards Could turned 

in tin Mcoad counter, There u.*- no 
more scoring during the contest although 

the Agate- had the pink in their o|f|>o 
nent's territory tor the greater part of 
the third period. 

( olliy excelled in elefensive work while 
the Agates wen somewhat off in their 

•hooting. The ice was good and the 

passing of the \l Iggic player- u.i- 

the beat thai they base shown th.- 
seaaon. The work of both goal tendei iwaa 

of very high order. The game was re- 
markablv free from penalties, only three 
being imposed during the i ntire game 
'Ihe- score: 
m.ac conn 

Swan, iv lw, Sott. T.itti-mall 

( , H .k. lw rw. Iliuiiitrioiid I'.mi. -i. 

i . '.onid. {otsaaaa, DntsssMMaJ 

AI,i.iIi.iiii-oii, td Id. ( arl~.' 

l-.irw.-ll. M i'l Tiki 

ristanhi k s. w.st 

l,,il- m olid tx-ll'xl, Theil Ulla.-I.'i'dl C.oulJ 
KrifBMaSK kiliii<- U.uii. ■-. ( obnrn \«-t um- 
pire- Brickaoa and Hinds of ( olh> Time — 
three i Wmwute perioeSa. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2, 1927 



TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Puplished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



William L. Dolk 27 
Eknest L. Spencek '2H 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William L. Dolk '27 

Harold E. Clark '28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 

Howard W. Hunter '30 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

John B. Howard Jr. '30 

Kkk Singleton '30 

Faculty & Short Courts Edward H. Nichols '29 

Intercollegiate Editor Josephine Pani.ca 28 

Personals Editor Frances C. Bruce 27 



Editorial 
Athletics 



Campus News 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

*. . a i i trr '27 Business Manager 

f «^s A Whita«« '27 Advertising Manager 

g^wW Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Loring "28 

Edwik A. Wildbr 28 

Harold K. Ansrll 29 

Lawrbncr A. Carruth 29 

William A. Egan 29 

Frederick D. Thayer. Jr. -*•' 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as fecond-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for matUni rt, «fcW fgte 

of postage provided for in ***** « \- Mt of ° C " 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20, 1918. 



Thr instructor apparently makes very 
little effort to maintain discipline. Hi- is 
IMaMc to hold the attention of his hearers 
in the subject matter of his lei lures and 
therefore the students receive very little 
from the presentation of the same. He is 
easily side-tracked into fields more in- 
teresting |)erhaps than the one in hand, 
by the desire of a group in the class 
merely to while away the hour. Astron- 
omy and astrology are interesting subjects 
but one dislikes having fifty minutes 
spent in a dissertation on the heavens at 
the ex|K-nse of the essentially important 
material of the course. 

The students themselves are not saints 
and absolved from the guilt of what takes 
place during the hour. It seems to be the 
general feeling that this is the time for 
relaxation and some of the "let ups" are 
grossly insulting to the apparently ab- 
aorbed and oblivious instructor as well as 
being unworthy of college men. Con- 
versations are held in loud tones, all 
kinds of textbooks, except those con- 
cerned with the course, are perused, chalk 
is thrown, and some of the more daring 
"votives at the Pierian Spring" even fall 
asleep. The instructor is imitated in 
speech and action, and jokes of the "wise 
crack" variety are continually in the air. 
Is this the proper atmosphere for a 
college classroom and if not, what should 
lie done to remedy this state of affairs? 
To those who were serious in electing tin- 
courses, the aftermath is a rather flat and 



PERSONALS 



FACULTY NOTES 



A young lady from Northampton votes 
Ray C.riffin the "nicest man at MAC" 

P 

Kddie Bike '24 visited the campus last 

Saturday. 

P 

The engagement of Karle Bruorton '2t> 
and Miss Iva Denny, of the library force, 

has lieen announced. 

p 

No new buildings this year. Johnny- 
White asks what could we expect with a 
new ticket office? 

P 

The engagement of Cliff Robinson '27 
and Miss Esther Post has been announced. 

P 

We wonder if the arrival of Kid Core 
Junior, the second, will occasion the 
passing of cigars and candy to the ath- 
letic teams. 

P 

From the books observed in a room at 
Kappa Sig one might write a song "And 
1 Learned About Women from Bill". 

- — P 

(.eorge Berry ex'27, who for the past 
three months has bees helping to roof 
Florida after the Miami hurricane, is 
now in San Diego, California. He expCCtl 
to return to college next fall. 



Prof. Clifford J. Fawcett, Extension 
Professor of Animal Husbandry, and 
Prof. Julius H. Frandsen. Professor and 
Head of the Department of Animal 
and Dairy Husbandry, spoke at the 
annual meeting of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Fairs Association held at 
Gardner, Mass., January 27 and 28. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. FEB. 2, 1927 



WITH THE ALUMNI 



Miss Sarah Louise Arnold, of Lincoln, 
a member of the Board of Trustees,, visited 
the campus Monday and Tuesday of this 
week. She met with the faculty staff at 
its meeting Monday afternoon in order 
to become better acquainted with the 
faculty and the work of the College. 



A son was born last Saturday morning 
to Prof, and Mrs. Harold If. Core. 



Saturday evening, the faculty are 
holding another of the regular series of 
faculty dances. 



Stretch lecVey left the infirmary for 

dismal d is app oi ntment; to the "repeat- | a fa, days, but was forced to return after 

k-rs", those who have been in this instate- ,) u . Glee flub trip to Kasthamplon 



COLLEGE PROBLEMS AND NEEDS 

In his first annual report to the Trus- 
ts, s „i the College since he was elected 

President, Prexy Lewis indicated several 
interesting and significant needs and 
problems at M.A.I First, he pointed 
out that the bill which WSS passed in tin- 
State Legislature last year regarding 
M.A.C. had already clone a great deal 
toward re establishing harmony in MA. 
t\ affairs. Now, the college can settle- 
down to facing curricular problems. 
Since the courses at this college are nine h 
more diversified than ever la-fore, and 
since there has Ir-cii no general over 
hauling of the curriculum for many 
yc-ais, such action is truly in order. 
Faculty and undergraduate committees 
are meeting regularly, working on this 
very protilcni. It is bspad that t he- 
Course of Study Committee will have 
its. report ready sc that the new curricu- 
lum will become effective in the fall. 

Mass. Aggie is one of the very tew 
State- educational institutions that SSI 
never yet received I gill of a building 
from a private donor. In view of Mass. 
Aggie's conspicuous contributions to the 
scientific and educational divisions of the 
agricultural field, it docs not seem un- 
reasonable to expect private help. A 
drive for private donations to the College 
is brewing at pretest. The State has 
been advised of our building needs, which 
amount to about *1 ,260,000. Those of 
us who are closely associated with the 
college know that this sum represents a 
ctmservative estimate. There is also the 
possibility that the State will not author- 
ize the full amount. 

In closing. Prexy proved that the 
records show no diminishing in numbers 
because of the tuition fee inaugurated 
last fall. 



tor's courses before, the course and t he- 
final are simply mate-rial for more- frater- 
nity house jest. We are not questioning 
the sincerity or the ability of this particu- 
lar instructor. We are of the opinion, 
and our rather careful observation of, 
and participation in, these- courses, have 
Convinced us that the conditions in this 
department are at a Stage where adminis- 
trative- interference is not only advisable-, 
but absolutelv imperative. 

E. L. S. 



Prof. Clark L. Thayer has recently 
been appointed to the position of State 
Vice- President of the Society of American 
Florists and Llorticulturalists. There are 
three vice-presidents in Massachusetts 
in. I each state has a certain number of 
vice-presidents. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

We suggest that at future musical 
programs a man be appointed to give- a 
signal when clapping is in order. It is 
rather disconcerting to musicians to l>e 
applaude d before they have finished. 
* • • 

We dare not make any further com- 
ments about the- weather for it see ins to 
be balmy when we y;o to press and quite! 



-P 

bill Hart is having his face lifted. 
P 

Eddie Haertl had to make- .lose con- 
nections in order to get to Springfield 
alter the Kappa Sig house dance. 
P 

Moon Mullen who was Mievetl to be 
at home, seriously ill, returned last Fri- 
day, well rested. 

We hope that Pinkie Dyer doesn't have 
to go to the infirmary for some time. 
P 



Dr. Charles A. Peters and Dr. Carl 
R.'Fcllcrs have been away durnig the 
past week serving as e-xpert witnesses at 
an important trial in Pittsficld. 



Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain gave a 
lecture recently U-fore the- Men's Forum 
in Ipswich on "The Relation of Chem- 
istry to Agriculture". 



Prof, (lark L. Thaver spoke at the 
Borough Pomona ('.range at Marl- 

borough last Wednesday" 



Dutch Anew is having a little compe- 
tition lately. 

CARTOONIST AND SINGER 

(Continued from pafce 1) 

Portland Head Light, and was a remark- 
ably faithful representation of the actual 

scene. 

The artist then introduced a nenclty, 



Ik- Damn wnen »e n" ... p.*—- i , 

the opposite- when our issue- returns from illustrating the SOAg -och Lomond as 



HONOR vs. ENVIRONMENT 

We are all of the opinion that the 
Donor Council is highly justified in its 
recent investigations of "cribbing" dur- 
ing one of the fall term final examinations. 
But should the investigation stop with 
the Honor Council or should it Ik- taken 
up by higher authorities.' 

It is not the purpose of this editorial to 
defend or plead lor those- who are con- 
cerned. We sincerely believe that men 
who lower themselves to "cribbing", re- 
gardless of the circumstances surrounding 
them, de-serve DO sympathy or open con- 
sideration. Our purpose is to start, or 

suggest, a movement which will attempt 

to remedy this state of affairs and prevent 
a repetition of the events which took 
piece ti'is past term. 

The spirit prevalent in this course SS 
well as in other courses offered by the 
instructor, lends itself Very re-adily to 
laxity, both during the term and in the 
final examination. The majority of these- 
courses are considered hy those who have- 
ever taken any of them, as "guts". One- 
will have tf) admit that it seemed almost 
a waste of time- to attend the lectures 
because of the little, or no benefit what- 
soever, received from them. From the 
In-ginning of the hour until the bell rings 
the place resembles Bedlam. 



the printer. 

• • * 

Sophomore competition for the CttfffftM 

has started. We have- an inte-resteel group 
which should furnish some good material 
for the- next Gatfefiaa Board. 

• * * 
The Dean's Board is very near, witness 

the quizzes which are- increasing in som- 
ber, unless you are taking these courses 
in which there is a quiz at every meeting. 

• * ♦ 
The Informal Committee are trying a 

new place next Saturday. Help them 
give it a fair trial. Of course, this dens 
not mean that the Memorial Building is 
henceforth taboo, but merely, that we 
can have another po s sib i lity in ease of 
conflicts. 

OVERTIME PERIOD GIVES 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

whistle-. The lead then zigzagged from 
one- side of the scoreboard to the other. 
baskets by Pai tc-nheimer. C.riffin, Ret el, 
and 8 last-minute follow-in bv Thomas 
put the Agates ahead. L'l to 20. He-R- 
DuneU dr opped in ■ double-decker, and 
Reed came through with a foul shot just 
before the gun. The Overtime KSsion 
WSS all Maine-. 

Epstein was the -tar of the contest 
with six floor goals, while Thomas was 
high scorer for Mass. Aggie. The visitors 
experienced difficulty in adjusting them- 
selves to the wide floor in the ne-w armory, 
and the Maine quinte t excelled with 
ace urate shooting, even though they held 

the ball for onb short period. Although 

ibe- score was close, the game was not 

as la-i BS -ome others already played; 

the M.A.C. team was seemingly not quite 

up to the standard set in recent clashes. 

The score: 



it was sung by Miss Milos. In the time- 
that it took Miss Milos to sing this song 
Mr. Parker achieved I singularly striking 
portrait of Loch Lomond, as represented 

by the song. 

Some clay M odel ling was the next 
portion of the performance to Ik- given. 
Mr. Parker started with the face of a 
Negro and, by making various slight 
changes, turned this into successively: a 
Chinese, a Japanese, a Frenchman, a 
Cerman. an Irishman, and a Hebrew. 

The illustrator ended his part of the 
program by drawing a charming picture 
of a deserted farmhouse seen just at 
sunset, with the surrounding hills and 
the river in front lit up by the sun's rays. 
The entertainment concluded with a group 
of songs by Miss Milos. 



Prof. Fayette H. Branch who is ex- 
tension professor in Farm Management, 
went to Washington last week to attend 
some meetings held in connection with 
the preparation of the Annual Agricul- 
tural Outlook which is published each 
vear by the Bureau of Agricultural 
I 'ii.nomics of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. In connection with 
these meetings Prof. Branch attended a 
series of meetings of farm management 
socialists from the various states which 
were helel to discuss ways and means of 
making farm management extension ser- 
vices more effective. 



MILITARY NOTES 



MAINE 

Epstein, if 
Kant'orUs, II 
Branfcom, c 
Bctrtt) . < 

11.111-1 -11111. 1-'. 

DurreS. in 
Tliui ston, It; 



MASS. 



('.. V. V 



2 4 



1 

1 

I l' 

o o 



AGGIE 

e.. F. I 
2 1 
1 

o 



( iriffui, rf 
Reed, if 

"1 liuina.-. c 
Couko 
l'.ui'lii-iiut-r. rn 2 
Me Bwaa, rfj 8 
Murdoimh. Is <> 
Nash, la <• 



I I 



Totals 
Referee 



12 : 
-Wallace. 



fj 

'1 inn- 



Totals ■ i '-'•'' 

Two 20-niin. halves 



ROBERT FROST, NOTED POET 

(Continued from Pa*e I) 

The SUBS principle applies to poetry, 
a.eording to Mr. Frost. He does not 
be -lieve that a writer should be interested 
in a sentence or paragraph for itself only. 
He behoves that the idea should be su- 
preme and that the paragraph should be 
subordinated to it. To illustrate this lu- 
re-ad one of his poems, called "Birches". 
While this poem has considerable luxurv 
of movement and sentence, yet. he pointed 
out. it has a purpose. He declared that 
if it were necessary he would be willing 
to slight the paragraph for the end, but. 
at all events, he must see from the very 
beginning just where his writing is going. 
This idea is in contrast to the ideas of 
poets of the other school who believe that 
the end and aim of poetry is the line, 
that structure and sound of words are 
the- objects to be sought. 

Mr. Frost read several other poems, 
including "Mending Walls", which is 
written in blank \erse-, and typifies the 
kind Of poetry that lias led some people 
to refer to him as "the Agricultural 
Poet". He also read two of his lyrics. 
"Spring Pools", and "Stopping by Woods 
on a Snowy Evening", both of which an 
more concerned with the sense of words. 
and an extremely short play, "Cows in 
the Barn", supposedly setting forth the 
New England accent in all its purity. 



As the Honor Roll for last week was 
omitted we are printing it this week. 
McKittrick — 100 out of a possible 1<H>. 
Eelson — the same, 
/.ielinski — also the same. 
The Honor Roll for this week is as 
follows: 

Possibles: 
Black 
Ames 
Day 
McKittrick, sitting position. 



'24 Alexander W. Grieve is now 
located with the W. T. Grant Company, 
Lawrence, Mass. 

'24 Elwyn J. Rowell is now located 
at headquarters of the Worcester County 
Extension Service, Worcester, filling a 
position which was left vacant by Julius 
Kroek '22. 

'21 Irving E. Gray is assistant pro- 
fessor of zoology at Tulane University, 
New Orleans, La. 

'24 James H. Gadsby, who has bees 
in Florida for some time, has now gone 
to Miami to join the large landscape 
delegation there which largely center 
round the park dej>artment of which J. 
Gerry Curtis ex'07, is superintendent. 

'22 Soloman Daniel recently issm d 
a prosperous looking business card an- 
nouncing the removal of his offices to 
151 West 40th St., New York City, 
where he will continue to practice general 
law. 

'22 Julius Ivroek is now with the 
Division of Markets, State House, Boston. 
18 Lawrence H. Patch of the U. S 
Bureau of Entomology is on the camps* 
doing graduate work in entomology and 
botany during the winter term. 

'16 Dr. Harold G. Little is now 
located at the University of Pittsburgh, 
Pathological Laboratories, Pittsburgh, I'.i 
'17 An extract from the War Depart- 
ment, Spedal Orders, No. 2iW, read- m 
follows: "The change in name of the 
Captain Charles Henry Hagelstein, In 
fantry, to Charles Hayes Henry, i- 
announced." Charles is with the 17th 
Infantry, Fori Crook. Nebraska. 

Through the kindness of Dr. Joseph K 
Root 'lit, autographed likenesses of each 
member of his class now hang in tin 
corner of the alumni room in Memorial 
Hall. The ind ivi d ua l photographs, which 
were taken over fifty years ago an 
mounted together in one frame. Above 
this frame hangs the time-honored 71 
banner and below it is a framed group 
picture of the eleven members of the da* 
who attended their fiftieth reunion lasj 
June. Dr. Root has also had the row d 
7»i class trees, elms located along the 
east side of Lincoln Avenue in the rear 
of Memorial Hall, marked with a bronu 
tablet. 

The associate alumni is im 
Mi— M. Louise- brewer, siste 
Charles Brewer '77, for the dc 
her brother's (lass Album to the Mi -in- 
orabilia Collection in the library. The 
album contains autographed photos of 
the graduates of the class of '77, the 
pictures having been taken prior to tht 
graduation of the class from CoHefl 
Miss Brewer also presented the Botam 
Department with an Herbarium which 
was prepared by Mr. Brewer over til". 
yean ago while a student at M.A.C. 



This week the rifle team is firing a 
match with Western Maryland. The 
match with Culver, which was to be 
fire-el last week, is not yet quite finished. 



Several nen me mb e rs have been added 
to the band during the last week. With 
the assistance of these men the- band 
Should be able to make a very good 
showing this year. 



The following is a letter which has hen 
received by the ( .iris' ( dee Club comment- 
ing on the work of the club over the air 
Saturday evening, Jan. 22. We hope that 
other alumni who heard the concert, will 
write and tell us how they liked it 
receiving communications from them 
makes us feel that the alumni are- in- 1 
terested in the work of the undergrade''- 
of M.A.C. 

Jan. 23, 1927. 
Dear Members of the Glee Club: 

You certainly deserve congratulation? 
for your performance on the air throupl 
WBZ last night! The songs lacked noth- 
ing in "snap" and clearness of enuncia'i"' 
nor the necessary spontaneity. 

Good work — and let me extend my he-' 
wishes for the future success of the club | 

Yours for the glory of "Old Aggie 
George L. Church -' 



AMHERST VICTOR 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

bis post creditably. The loss of Caainpt 

Forest, who was unable to play became 

of an infected lip. was a decided handicap. 
This was the first varsity game played 
on the Campus Pond, and the low barrier 
around the rink proved an excellent 
stumbling block to catapult the unwary 
OUt of bounds The summary 



Mass. Aggie 

Nash, Cook, rw 

Frees, c 

Swan, lw 
Abrahanison, rel 
Harwell, hi 
Galanie, g 

Coal — Cameron. 



Amherst 

lw, Law son, Felt 

c, Cameron 

rw, Patrick 

Id, Perry 

rel, Parnall 

g, Currier 

Referee — Dowd. 



1NTERFRATERMTY 


BASKETBALL 


RESULTS 


T. C. 


14 


K. K. 


K. S. 


18 


L. ( . A. 


N. F. 


8 


K. E. • 


P. S. K. 


It) 


Q. T. V. 


S. P. E. 


88 


K. E. 


Q. T. V. 


27 


A. S. P. 


T. C 


23 


L C. A. 


Q. T. V. 


18 


K. S. 


N. F. 


10 


S. P. K. 



( Seal umpires - - Mulhern and Smith. 
j inie _three b>minute periods. 



The M.A.C. radio broadcast 1»*| 
Saturday evening from WBZ Wat 
by a double quartet from the Phi Sigj 
Kappa fraternity. The epiartet con-i-""i 
of Thomas V. Henneberry '27, N* 8 ? 
Robinson '27, Wendall E. Est. 
Douglas W. Loring '28, Emory 
Burgess 'itl, C. Shepley Cleavi - 
Lawrence E. Richards '30, and EvW L 
Richardson '."30. 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SuitS are the finest obtainable in Great Britain. They embrace comfort, style, fit and excluaiveness of 

THOMAS F. WALSH 

MORE THAN A TOGGERY— A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



3 BIG DAYS 
Thursday - Friday- Saturday 

FEBRUARY 3-4-5 

Do not miss this last chance to buy at 
Reduced Prices 

B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

Announcement lias Ih-cm made ul i lu- 

editorial staff tar the SktHktm, which is 

the Near lxx>k of the Two- Year course 
The editor-in-chief is Rolx-rt \V. Mall- 
Ixwru '27 of West field and his assisMnt 
editors are John 1*. Roy '27 U«J Alan l>. 

Stackpole '-'8. The buehiet*. enanafef is 

John E. (iihhs '21 of Nantucket and the 

■eeiataat minageri .ire George \Y. Hall 
J7 and Errol V. Cook L'S. Ehaar S, 
Fitaferald '21 is advertising eaanafpr and 
is aaakted l>\ Gftei II. Wilicy l'k. The 

following positions will 1h held by t he 

following nun: Art Editor, Roland \V. 

Smith L'7, Athletic Editor, Mario Nicolai 

'l'7, Joke Editors, Guetai Nilsaoa '21 and 
Walter T. Shea '2X, and Pictures, Bernard 

II. Ken von '21. 



An innovation in th. -m., ial life of the 
Short Courses took place in the Kolon] 

Kluli last Thursday evening srhea the 
me sabers of the Kotoay Kluh held a 

smoker for the members of the Winter 




School, A food nuinlH-i of the Winin 
School Students were present and s|>ciil 

i pleasant evening playing cuds and 
names. Then em a lew speeches and 
a loin red movie was an added feature. 



1 he Short Course office wishes to make 
the announcement that if at any time 
any Intensity wishes to borrow their 
moviag picture projector for a social 
affair, or lor any other reason, that thev 
an- glad to loan it provided arrant-mints 
are made well in advance. 



Richard Tonsatt 18 made ■ short 

visit to the A.T.C. rooms last Sund.iv. 

Mr. Toneeth i- .it pr esen t connected with 
the Riverdale Nurseries in Wist Spring. 

held. 



income Substitute 

The substitute player will take 
the regular player's place when 
needed. 

So will our Life Income Policy 
take the place of your income 
when needed, for it will pay 
you $100 monthly whenever 
disabled, and at age 65 any- 
way for the rest of your life. 

Your family shares in the pro- 
tection, too, for should you 
die young, the Income Policy 
will pay them $10,000. 

Write for booklet, "Pension 
Yourself". 

Connecticut Genera! 

Life I nsuranceCompany 

ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Creenfield 1H73 M 
Greenfield, M 



At the Freshman class meeting last 
Wedn es da y, Earie I . Uorawaki ol Auk- 
bore was chosen as the Freahmaa repre- 

Mutative to the Honor Council. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up os» SlAhn 

Ocullata Prescriptions Killed Brok.n I 
accurately replaced 
Bit; BEN ALARM CLOOES and other 
reliable makes 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NRW I'KH.'KS 

Men's Whole Sole*, Rubber Heels - • - $2.5! 

Men's Half Soles, Rubber Heels • • • 1.79 

Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels • • 2.25 

Men's Half Soles 1 «• 

Work Guaranteed — Corm-rof l'le:tsant I 

Amity Sis. Open till 8 P. M. 



I own Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thure. 



J. oo, 

7.. Ml 



Friday 



•.45. fl.M 



Saturday 
too 

K..I0 b.45 



NORMA I AI.MAIX.K In 
MM" 
Norma Talmadse us the waif 
ol furls makes this her Sreat 
est role. 

\ml HOOT (.IHSON in 
"TIIK KII.KNT RIIMCR" 
A wild, smashing* tale of 
cattle rustlera and love and 
romance on a western range. 
News fables 

Regular I'rlcea 
Adults 2.V Children 10. 



The Screen Sensation 

Of 1'WO l .ir.lln.llU 

"KAUST" 
The world most famous 
love story. Kmll Jannlnga 
contributes a role that will 
thrill and amaze. 
Sporlllghl Comedy 



ION CIIANKV In 
"Till-: III ACMIIRD" 
Mystery foggy Streets 
limehouse Romance — 
■Sal Stes 1 1 all hovers the 
meniiiiim shadow of ihe 
lllackhlrd. 
News Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

I'ATIIKX iiu aret Personal Motion 
Picture Outfit. On Outings, Motor Trips 
and Travels take a I'ATIIKX. Buy the 
Whole Action Picture Outfit at 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

RKAR AMIIf'.RST RANE 



You wlU find an eicellanl 

. . . SIIOK RKI'AIRIM. SHOP ... 

equipped with the most up-to-date Coodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SIIOK SHINING PARLOR 

at ll| Amlty-St., • Opp. New Theatre 

Wi understand your riquirtmenli and an pti 

par id to mat your nttds. 

All work tuaranlnd Shoes skined and dyed, 60, 

VINCENT CRANDONICO. Prop. 



VALENTINES 

including many 

NOVELTY BOXES 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 

Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

I it. st hoUH KMIth of campus. 
Telephone 511 



SPECIAL SALE ! 



EVERYTHING AT DISCOUNT. 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 

EVERYBODY HAS A SWEETHEART 

OUR VALENTINES are ready 
All Kinds 



To Get the Best, Buy 

"MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 
Bloomers — Step-ins Vests 

Combinations 



SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BV 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 
A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



>rder your Tuxedo early for Fraternity banquets. 

A new and complete stock of Tuxedo shirts, ties and accessories on hand. Remember we are selling suits and overcoats at close out prices. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DE.ALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Th* * &ey>oaJLL Storm 



SING LEE HANPLAtJNDRY 

f No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Msvaa 

| Our Laundry First Class 

Our Pallcy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AM) AIX KIM>S OF 
WASIIIM. DONE AT RKASONAHI.r 
PRICKS. 

Op|Misiii- Post OffU«- 



SPECIAL SA1.K 

TO IMF \CCIk VON 

sup iii .n.i ftt-i ■ pair rfOegaaaQsjJaaaa mt 

our lir.n.l iifv* pumlirmwrrriritnlriKi'iiilt 
Sh...- Rip.tlrlnil Department 

JOHN KOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



Judged by style, quality and wear a STETSON gives you more value for your money than a hat of any other fine make in the world. 
THE NEW STETSONS are now on display. 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



HYANNIS 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2, 1927 



Marked Improvement 

In College Poultry 

Study and Research of Poultry Hus- 
bandry Dept. Brings Cood Results. 



YE AGGIE INN 

S'lOKE 
Banners 

Pennants 

Pillow Covers 
Stationery 



Bean Contest 

One Chance for every 25 cent 

purchase (not including 

candy and tobacco) 



YE AQGIE INN 

RESTAURANT 
Sunday night lunches our 

Specialty. 
Ice Cream 

Lunches. 



DiniiiK ll'«- P** "" **•*• ,m '"' ,,a " 

bMfl ■• wonderful advaox*raeiit wade bi 

ilu- quality and production <>' the experi- 
ment,!. il<»k by the Department <»t 
Poultry Husbandry, under the direction 
<.t Prof. John C. Graham. Thie develop- 
ment lia^ been the reaull <>i extensive 
■tudy and reeearch carried out bj the 
1 department. 

In i hi* reeearch work emphasis waa 
placed on the following factore: Early 
maturity, Persistency, Noti-broodineee, 
and Intensity. 

The sge at first egg <>! the original 
Hocks was 260 to 280 days. I he average 
age at first en "' last yea*'* •** *•" 
L92 days, ■bowing I saving of approxi- 
matety two months in growing these 
birds to laying maturity. This year the 
svsrap number of eggs ttom the i!<>ik 
was 205 eggs. Thui is ."> eggs more ttian 
ever l>efore. 

By reducing the Bomber <>f l>inls going 

broody annually and also the huiiiIkt of 
broody periods for each l»ird, the flock 
now has broodiness reduced to about 12 
to 15 percent of what it was at the 
beginning. This is an exceptional record. 
Persistency, which has to do with late 
laying in the fall of the hen year, has been 
greatly increased hut the exact measure 
of progress cannot be stated because of 
the lack of definite data, but many of 
the recent flocks lay into November and 
even into December before beginning the 
molt, whereas a very large |>ercentage of 
the flock molted in October or September 
of the earlier flocks. 

Intensity is connected with the rate of 
laying. At present work is being carried 
out relative to the segregation of this 



data but the final neeuH cannot be 
Mated until all of the data hai been 
collected. 



CHSB8B EXHIBIT 

Profrssnt Frandsen <>t the Animal and 

Dairy Husbandry Department, announce.- 

thai plan- have been made whereby the 

Dairy and Home Kconomics Departments 
jointly will Stage a chee-e exhibit at Flint 

Laboratory, February 24 and 25. An 
effort will l>c made i<> show practically 
all the leading makes of cheese. Dairy 
films knowing the process of manufacture 

and other interesting exhibit material 

will be shown during these two days. 

There will also be social bulletins show- 
ing methods of manufacturing cheese SI 
well as information regarding beat uses 
for cheese in the home. Those inter. Med 
should keep these dates in mind. 



The department ol Plant ami Animal 
( hemistry of the Experiment Station i- 

now instituting research work relating '<> 
I he growt h requirements of growing 

calves. This is peculiarly significant in 
New England on account of the fact that 

much of the lime and other necessary 
minerals originally i" the soil i- partially 
exhausted by the two centuries of con- 
tinuous cropping. 



Professor frank Prentice Kand. The 

men's group will hold its meeting tail 

evening at the home of Mi. Altred 
Niekleson, Instructor in English. 



Insignia Chapel will be held next 

Friday morning, February 4. at which 

lime athletic Utters ami sweaters, aca- 
demic activities medals, and the Hills 
Botanical Prizes will be awarded. The 
awards to the various judging teams will 
not be made till the spring term. 



At the meeting of tin Landscape Club 
last Wednesday evening, Mr. Thotnaa II 
Desmond of Stmebury, Conn., a proies- 
sional landscape architect, di a ru ss erl the 

landscape architecture c,f several foreign 

nation-. As the meeting was mosth 

attended by Seniors, the latter part he 
devoted to answering questions on the 

future of landscape architecture. 



■r_- 

■sr ' 


1 ^r3SF f ■ ^k^k\ 




^^rffl 


■■ 





The girls' YnkhotlU group met but 

Wednesday evening at the home of 



Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity broad- 
casted I. ist Saturday night from Station 

WBZ. «>n February 12, Tbeta Chi will 

broadcast from the same station, in 
connection with their initiation banquet 
at the Hotel Kimball in Springfield. 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

The Kx|>eriiiient Station has now in 
press the re|>ort of the detailed study of 
the market for New Kngland apples, as 
made by Prof. Lorian P. Jefferson of the 
department of Agricultural Kconomics. 
This is the most thorough going survey 
yet made of market outlet of what has 
come to be a great industry. 



WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 

275 High St., Holyoke 



The annual report from the Fertilizer 
Control Office of the Experiment Station 
has just been issued and bears the names 
of three alumni of the College: H. D. 
Haskins '30, in charge; L S. Walker '05, 
and M. W. Goodwin '26. This is the 
fifty-third report on Fertilizer Control 
issued from the Station office. 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 



• » 



SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



A 




EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

ft 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



prime 
favorite 
on the campus 

IN ANY group of regular fellows, you'll find 
Prince Albert. It belongs. It speaks the lan- 
guage. You get what we mean the minute you 
tamp a load of this wonderful tobacco into the 
bowl of your jimmy-pipe and make fire with 

a match. 

Cool as a northeast bedroom. Sweet as a 
note from the Girl of Girls. Fragrant as a wood- 
land trail. Prince Albert never bites your tongue 
or parches your throat, no matter how fast you 
feed it. You'll smoke pipe-load on pipe-load 
with never a regret. 

Buy a tidy red tin of P. A. today. Throw 
back the hinged lid and breathe deeply of that 
real tobacco aroma. Then . . . tuck a neat 
wad into the business-end of your jimmy-pipe 
and light up. Now you have it . . . that 
taste! That's Prince Albert, Fellows! 

Fringe albert 

-—no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. it told everywhere ist 
tidy red lint, pound and half' 
pound tin humidors, and 
pound crystal-glass humidor* 
with sponge-moistener top. 
And always with every bit 
of bite and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert process. 




O W27, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Why Be Prosaic? 



Just because its winter and you wish spring would ccme is no reason to feel sunk. Hundreds of new ties— gay, colorful and distinctive are here 
ready to cheer and brighten your appearance. A tie a day keeps the blues away. 



SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUL.T 



1 



AGAIN 
—we have- 
Dairy Delights 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

M BUILDING 

47 VARIETIES OF CANDY 

IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, LET US RECOMMEND 



APPLES 

Fresh From Cold Storage 
TWICE A WEEK 



Sfrg jfltaBHarfrttBgttfl (Mbmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. <>, 1927 



Number 16 



Athletic and Academic 

Honors To Many Students 

Twenty-four Men Get Recognition For Athletic Service. 
Twelve Awards for Work in Academics 



At the insignia chapel last Friday 

morning, thirty-six Aggie students m 
awarded eitner athletic or academic 
honors in recognition for their work in 
their chosen activities during the past 
few months. Of these awards twelve 
were given in recognition of meritorious 
work in academics, while twenty-four 
were for service on various athletic 
teams. The Hills Botanical Prize of $20 
was awarded to Almeda M. Walker '27 
of Southbridge. This prize is given by 
the late Henry F. Hills of Amherst for 
the best herbarium and the competition 
is open to members of the Senior, Junior, 
and Sophomore classes. 

Academic awards were conferred by 
Director Sidney B. Haskell of the Ex- 
periment Station, Cold medals were 
presented to Charles F. Clagg '27 of 
Barnstable, Collegian and Clee Club; 
Ruth E. Davison '27 of West Springfield, 
(,irls' C.lee Club; William I.. Dole '27, 
Collegian; Harry C. Nottebaert '27 of 
Lexington, Roister Doisters; Clarence H. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Song Contest 
Arouses Interest 



Nine Fraternities Will Take Part 
Second Annual Sing. 



in 



One of the most intrraating events 
slated to take place on Alumni Day, 
February 12, is the Annual Interfraternity 
Song contest, to the winner of which will 
be presented a large silver cup. Last year 
when the contest was held for the first 
time, the cup was won by Phi Sigma 
Kappa, and it is expected that they will 
be strong contenders for the trophy this 
year. The majority of the fraternities on 
(Continued on Page 4) 



RELAY TEAM THIRD 

AT B.A.A. MEET 



Schappelle 
Race Won 



Makes Best 
by Bates. 



Showing. 



New Literary Club 

Holds First Meeting 

Organization Attracts Interest of 
Many Students. 



A new organization, the Literary Club, 
recently made its appearance on the 
campus in the form of a discussion held 
in the M.A.C.C.A. office last Tuesday 
night. This organization, formed by 
Constantine P. Ladas '28, is primarily 
a discussion group aiming to develop 
self-expression and promote naturalness 
therein. So far no regular time has been 
set for the meetings, the time and subject 
to be announced a short time previous 
to the meetings. 

The speaker of the evening was William 
K. Crant '30, who chose as his topic 
"The Contribution of the Orient to 
Modern Civilization". In a well-ordered 
talk he showed how the Orientals have 
played an important part in the history 
of civilization, and, contrary to general 
ideas, have produced many great think- 
ers and inventions. The speaker's com- 
ments were followed by a general dis- 
( natfoa which proved very interesting. 

The meeting was so well-attended that 
a larger room will have to be secured for 
future gatherings. 



The M.A.C. relay team finished third 
in the race with Hates and New Hamp- 
shire at the B.A.A. meet in Hoston last 
Saturday. Bates took first place in the 
time of SOL 31 2-5s. with New Hampshire 
a close second. Schappelle, the first 
Aggie man, followed his opponents closely 
but during the rest of the race the team 
fell slowly behind. Hcnneberry, had the 
misfortune to collide with a preceding 
Bates runner loitering on the track, thus 
losing considerable yardage. The other 
two members of the team were Kay and 
Captain Hall. 

One more race is scheduled with 
W.P.I. and an invitation to race at the 
meet of the 104th Regiment at Springfield 
March 5 has been received. 



Fresh 



man Class Plans 

For Novel Social 



Date Set for March 11. Committee 
Appointed to Take Charge. 



NORTH AMHERST HEARS 
GIRLS' GLEE GLUB 



Newly 
Makes 



Formed Co-ed 
Its Debut. 



Orchestra 



The first co-ed orchestra on campus 
made its appearance last Friday evening 
after the concert presented by the Cirls' 
Glee Club in North Amherst. The 
initial appearance of the orchestra was 
attended with some misgivings as it has 
been only recently organized and as yet, 
consists of only two orchestral instru- 
ments: piano and traps. However a 
beginning has been made and the idea of 
an orchestra to furnish dance music after 
Gitc Club concerts has met with such 
enthusiasm that arrangements are being 
made to make the orchestra a regular 
feature of the programs. Esther Perkins 
and Lois Bliss, both '29, make up the 
Personnelle of the orchestra — Miss Per- 
kins plays the piano; while Miss Bliss 
manipulates the traps. 

The concert which the Cirls' Club pre- 
sented in North Amherst is the second 
°f the season. This concert was ac- 
dtimed an improvement on the first, 
although the club suffered appreciably 
TOW the temporary loss of its regular 
Pianiste who was unable to attend the 
concert. The girls' quartet which has 
irted this year and which consists 
ofjosephine Panzita and Frances Thomp- 
son 28; Miriam Huss '29; and Kathryn 
Knight '30; made its debut at the concert. 

Except for a few changes, the program 
rendered in North Amherst was like that 
previously given at Cushman. 



At the class meeting held last Wednes- 
day by the Freshman class, it was decided 
to hold a Social on March 11. This is 
to be in a form slightly different from the 
usual social. There are at present eight 
separate groups in the Freshman daai. 
Kach of these groups is to furnish some 
sort of a short entertainment or skit, 
and the sum total of these little acta i> 
to be an entertainment preceding the 
dance. The music for the dancing will 
be furnished, if jjossiblc, by an orchestra 
made up wholly of Freshmen. The com- 
mittee in charge of the preparations is 
composed of the following: Miss Kathryn 
R. Knight, of Creenfield, chairman; Miss 
Isabel E. Morgan, of Schenectady, N.Y.; 
Miss Priscilla G. Wood, of West Bridge- 
water; Miss Inez W. Williams, of Brock- 
ton; Arthur F. Tilton, Jr., of Salem; and 
Kenneth G. Ives, of Amherst. 



Outing Club Invited 

To Dartmouth Carnival 

Several Factors Prevent Acceptance 
of Honor. 



College To Welcome 

Alumni Next Saturday 

Hockey Came and Song Contest 
Will Feature Program. 



The Dartmouth Outing Club has ex- 
tended an invitation to the M.A.C. 
Outing Club to participate in the seven- 
teenth annual Winter Carnival to be held 
at Hanover on February 10, 11, and 12, 
but it is doubtful if any contestants will 
represent M.A.C. this year. 

The Outing Club here is still in its 
infancy, and Professor Hicks, General 
Manager of athletics, has considered it 
best to confine its activities to those 
within its abilities, building the cabin, 
making trails, etc. It is hoped that 
within a few years sufficient progress will 
have been made, . however, which will 
enable the members to represent this 
College in intercollegiate competition. 

The program at the Dartmouth Carni- 
val includes skating, snow-shoeing, and 
ski-ing races and exhibitions on Friday 
and Saturday. 



Besides being the birtoda) of one of 
our greatest men, next Saturday, 1 *l •. 

12, is also ini|>ortaiit to us as the < lay 
when Aggie alumni return to visit their 
Alma Mater. The Memorial Building 
will be the headquarters of returning men 
and women, at which place they will lx> 
requested to register. 

The alumni dinner will be omitted this 
year, but the other events scheduled to 
take place should provide a program of 
sufficient interest to attract many former 
students. A hockey game with Williams 
is to take place at two o'clock, to be 
followed by the annual interfraternity 
song contest. This contest should prove 
of keen interest on account of the rivalry 
between houses. 

Fraternity banquets will be held in 
(lie evening at which, it is expected, many 
al ti nitii will be present. 



THIRTY COUPLES 
ATTEND INFORMAL 



Dancing at Amherst Women's Club 
Much Enjoyed. 



The first informal of the winter term, 
which was held last Sat unlay at the 
Amherst Women's Club, was a decided 
sin (ess. This waw the only informal 
ever to lie held in these club rooms. 
From three to nine about thirty couples 
enjoyed the combination of "Eddie" 
Haertl's Coq D'Or Band and a typical 
soiree environment. 

Everything seemed to be most con- 
ducive to a good time. The crowd was 
representative as far as feminity was 
concerned — girls being present from M. 
A.C., Smith, Mt. Holyoke, and Wellesley. 
A delightful six o'clock supper was 
served by the Draper Hall catering staff 
with "Johnny" White, "Ch.st" Mais.o.,, 
and Walter Smith in charge. 

The chaperones were Mrs. Crane from 
Mt. Holyoke, escorted by Kichard W. 
Grover '29, Mrs. Howes, Smith College, 
escorted by John R. Blackinton '.'10, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Hawley of 
Amherst. 



Charles E. Tisdale, a graduate of 
M.A.C., now manager of the Rocking- 
ham Guernsey farm at Salem, N.H., 
beaatl of a COW with a "college educa- 
tion". This tow, named "Brilliant 
Lassie", docs several remarkable things. 
She is able to ojien the door of her stall. 
to take a pail and draw water for herself 
from a faucet, as well as to turn on and 
off the electric lights. Quite a cow! 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



'On their oun merits modest men are dumb. 
—G. C.olman the Younger. 



Wednesday— 

Interfraternity Basketball: 

K.K. vs. Phi Sigma Kappa 

A.T.G. vs. Sigma Phi Epsilon 
7.00 p. m. Animal Husbandry Club Meeting 

in Stoclcbridge Hall. Speaker, Mr. Richard 

L. Faux of Killingly Farms, Barre. 
Thuraday— 

Interfraternity Basketball: 

Theta Chi v§. Kappa Sigma 

Delta Phi Alpha vs. Kappa Gamma Phi 
Varsity Hockey: 

New Hampshire at M.A.C. 
Friday— 
7.00 p. m. Social L'nion, Professor Charles H. 

Patterson. 
Girls' Glee Club Concert, South Decrfield. 
Saturday —Dean's Board 
Two- Year Basketball: 

Drury High at North Adams. 
Varsity Hockey: 

Williams at M.A.C. 
6.4.5 p. m. Radio Broadcast from WBZ: 

Theta Chi Fraternity. 
Sunday — 

9.10 a. m. Sunday Chapel, Rev. William 

Horace Gay, of the United Church, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Monday— 

(,itU' Glee Club Concert, Leventt. 

Tuesday— ^ 

Interfraternity Basketball: 

Q.T.V. vs. Lambda Chi Alph.i 

Kappa Epsilon vs. Delta Phi Alpli.i 
Varsity Hockey: 

Spriimfield at Springfield. 
Wednesday— 

Varsity Basketball. 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute at M.A.C. 

Girls' Giee Club Concert, Leeds. 



n 



Fast Williams 

Tripped bj vgates 



Home Team's Style of Play Baffles Vis 

Victory 



in 21-16 



Aggie Sextet 

Beats Vermont 

Teamwork of Bay Staters Big Factor 
In 2—1 Win. 

The Mass. Aggie pucksters defeated 
Vermont by a store of 12 to 1 at Burling' 
ton last Saturday. The ice was rather 
rough and because of thin the game was 
slowed up considerably. A cold wave 
enveloped the players and kept the 
number of spectator! down to a mini 
imiin. ( ialanie turned in his usual fine 
game at goal. 

The first goal was made by Cook of 
M.A.C. during the initial period of the 
contest, receiving a pass anil driving the 
puck into the cage. The game see-sawed 
back .m<l forth during the leinainder of 
this period and (he next. Karly in the 

third |>criod Vermont broke loose and by 

.i ( oniliiii.it ion oi good link and skill 
managed to score a goal. The puck 
glanced off of < ialanie's skate and rolled 
into the cage. Determined to bring the 
game back to Aggie, I rise carried the 
puck down the ice on his own and scut 
it into the net for another score. 

All of the M.A.C*. team played a fine 
brand of hockey and the work of no one 
player stands out above the rest to any 
great extent. The lineup of the Vermont 
team was not available but the Aggie 
team was as follows: Swan, Cook, rw; 
Forest Nash, Iw; Frese, CJ Farwell, rd; 
Abrahamson, Id; (ialanie, g. 

TWO-YEAR QUINTET 
MEETS FIRST DEFEAT 

Holyoke High <;rabs Close Came. 
Williamson and Holland Star. 



The Two-Year basketball team re- 
ceived its first setback of the season 
Tuesday evening, Feb. 1, when it was 
defeated 22- 15 by the fast Holyoke 
High team on the Drill Mall floor. <»ood 
defensive work anil the clever shooting 
of Holland kept the home team on even 
terms with the visitors during the first 
three periods. Sli|>shod playing on the 
part of the Two- Years in the last ipiait. i, 
however, allowed the Holyoke team to 
draw ahead and establish a seven j>oiiit 
lead baton the closing whistle. 

Holland was easily the outstanding 
player for the Two- Years, while William 
son featured for Holyoke. The summary: 



Holyoke 

It. V. P. 



M.A.G. 



Gsm, u 

Minkowski, II 
Williamson, rf 
Rafferty, < 
Antul. lb 
Mi-niman, rb 



b. r. p 

1 1 Butters, rb 1 1 

(I Yarrows, rb 
| til Chase, lb 

1 I I Holland, c 4 2 10 

1 (I 2 Pursona, rf D 

2 1 5 Crtsen. If 2 4 



Totals 9 4 22 Totals 6 I If 

Sore at half time- Holyoke 13, M.A.C. 12. 
■ct«*Si -Amstein. Time -10-minute periods. 



Freshman Five Trims 

Winchester High Team 

Visitors No Match for Husky Oppo- 
nents in One-Sided Contest. 



The visiting Winchester High basket- 
ball team coached by "Charlie" Reed '2fi 
was defeated to the tune of 28-7 by "Kid" 
Core's freshman quintet last Friday 
afternoon. The Winchester players wen 
too light to compete on even terms with 
their husky opponents and the Frosh 
kept the lead from the start of the game, 
the score at half time being 12-1 in their 
favor. The visitors started a rally in the 
last quarter but were unable to score many 

points. The summary: 

Freshmen Winchester. N.H. 

B. P. P. H I I' 

2 .'{ I Atherton, rg 

i ii 1 Poster, U 8 2 2 



Km-Hand, If 
Kll.rt. rf 

Bernard, rf 



(liirk.. 



Staniiiewski. c 2 '» 1 



Moraski. C 
Mann, lg 
Hall, lg 
Biirbnnk, Ik 
Paksarrian, rg 
Crane, rg 



2 4 

I (1 H 

(I 

1 2 

2 I 4 




Burns, rf 
Soaaoski. If 
Mar;irnon\ If 



1 2 

1 1 3 

o 





Totals 14 28 2 3 7 

Referee— Amstein Time 10-min. quarters. 



"Kid" (•ore's M.A.C. ipiintet gained a 
thrilling victoi\ o\< i the Williams hoop- 
sters in a nip .ind tuck contest staged in 
the Drill Hall last Friday night. The 
visitois were in the lead, ti to f>, at half 
lime alter a rather listless first |H-riod, 
but the Agates came into their own in 
the next session, overcame a three-point 
IcWaatage, and kept the up|)cr hand for 
the remainder of the contcM. 

The Agates o|>cncd with their usual 
deliberate offensive, which tired the 
Williams defenders without giving either 
side much of an advantage in the scoring 
column. The first basket of the game, a 
shot from the sidelines I >>- Thomas, was 
the only Aggie floor goal in the first half 
I mil shots by Griffin and Reed made up 
the total of live counters. Williams 
tallied on baskets by Shorn way and 
Sterling and two lice tin ■, 

The second session was all that the 
in-t was not. Captain Partenheimer 

intercepted the ball as one of his oppo- 
nents was < oiiiing down the lloor, passed 
to Kei'd, and the latter hurled it through 
the net from the sidelines. Single tries 
1>\ Met ban and Kccd let the BOOM at H to 
7. Here the Uoyal Purple ll.i-.hed a fast 
passing at taik, and Sluiniway ami /inn 
both scored, giving the visitors their 
largest lead of the game, II to H. 

"lllondie" Thomas retaliated with 

toother double-decker however, and 
"Holy" Reed came through with another 
ol his set shots. "Part" also ndded to the 
total with a follow-in shot, and "Koly" 
dropped two more through the hoop 
within a few minutes. Bethan and 
Sterling contributed to the opposite 
column wit h a basket apiece after dribbling 
in. A foul for either side and another 

(Coattauest cms Fats 4) 



Exhibit of Woodcuts 

In Memorial Building 

Work of English Artist Is of High 
Order. 



Those who have not yet seen the 
exhibit of color woodcuts by A. Kigden 
Read in the Memorial Building have 
nii^cil something that if well woiih ,i 
trip to tli.it building. The exhibit, 
circulated by the Ann i i< an I -edeiat ion of 
Aits, comprise* a variety of taDJOCta, 
beautifully printed in most pleasing color 
s< heme-. 

The artist lives in Wim lielsea, Kngland, 
one of the old itorts of I he Sussex coa-.t, 
anil has exhibited at the Royal Academy 
and at I .oodsiieed's in Hoston. The 
college is very fortunate in being able 
to secure such an excellent and unusual 
exhibition. 



HOCKEY TEAM LOSES 

TO MIDDLEBURY 3-0 

Home Team's Flashy Play Too Much 
for Visitors. 



The crack Middlehury sextet handed 
the M.A.C. hockey team its third defeat 
of the season at Middlebury last Friday. 
The ici was in excellent shape and the 
game was fast and well played. The fine 
work of I ialanie at goal was one of the 
features of the game. Middlebury is 
n-piesented by an exceptionally fast and 
skillful team. The final score was Middle- 
bury :,, M.A CO, 

The Agate forwards seemed to Ik- ttn- 
ftbie to solve the defense of the home 
dub, while the Middlebury attack suc- 
ceeded in (Hnetrating the- Aggie defense 

several timae, Hill, Whitteusore, Cruggcl, 

and I ' HBgafl Marrtd for the- victors. 



Fc 

Fi 

I 

At 

r;a 

< 

Wl 
c„ 
Co 



Middlebury 

rw, Hill. Simmons 

Iw, KeUey 

c. Whittemore 

rd. '.ruggel 

Id. Bossrrt 

g. Finnegan 

flcuury 3. MAC. 0. Goals— 

* I ill (iruggel. Referee— Barrie of 

-Wolfskekl. Penalty time-keeper — 

-three 20- minute periods. 



rw 
Iw 



Id 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 1927 








TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, PupHshed every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Kditoi-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



William L. Dole '27 
Ellsworth Haknakd '28 



Let the glad tidings ring forth! Dean's 
Board Saturday. 



Whether you think 
term is half over. 



so or not, the 



PERSONALS 



3 



DEPARTMKNT KDITORS 

William L. Dolb '27 

IIakoi.d K. ( LABI II 

\V. fjOMWM HtMhK '2'.t 

IloWAKU W. Ill NIKK "{I) 
KKNEST L. Si'KNlhK 41 

John 1. Howaku Jk. "JO 

BUC SlNGI.KI'lN 'SO 

Faculty & Short Courees KuwakiiH. Nichols IB 
Intercollegiate Kditor Joskpiiink Panzica '2K 

Personal* Kditor Frances C. Bruce '27 



Editorial 
Athletici 



Campus News 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charles F. Clagg '27 Business M s — ee j 

Lewis H. Whitaker "27 Advertising Manage] 

John E. White '27 Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Loring '2H 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 

Harold K. Ansell '29 

Lawrence A. Carruth 29 

William A. Egan '29 

Frederick D. Thayer. Jk. '29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



The drab season between the o|>ening 
of college in the fall and Insignia Chapel 
is over. WV arc glad to see that our 
newest letter men are not so modest M 
some have been in the past. 

* » » 

Let us cultivate the habit which we 
have been establishing lor fvC years of 
beating Williams in basketball. 



February 2 was a brilliant day, in case 
some of the unsophisticated forgot to 
notice. 



WITH THE ALUMNI 



MILITARY NOTES 



The roll of honor for this week is as 
follows: 

Day — three possibles 
Black — two possibles 
Ames — two possibles. 



Entered as Fecond-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted f«r mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1103. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 191K. 



UNLETTERED AGATES 

We have in our hands a communication 
which presents a startling fact and which 
forcefully comments on it. The (act 
is that we are threatened with re- 
moval of the foreign language require- 
ments in our curriculum. The comment 
is opposed to the realization of such 
action. Who can blame the author for 
feeling as he does? No undergraduate 
who has the best interests of M.A.C. at 
heart and who tries to picture a Mass. 
Aggie without a language requirement 
can justify this step. 

Of course, we realize that there will be 
a large group of undergraduates who will 
elect foreign language courses just as 
there are under the present regime. But 
Mr. Harris has pointed out that it is the 
requirement which influences our rating 
among other institutions. With only 
elective courses in French, German, and 
Spanish, why is it not logical for out- 
siders to question the quality of our 
foreign language department? 

We can well imagine that some v* ill 
accuse us of being conservative and un- 
willing to make a step in advance just 
because it is a radical one. Some of the 
openest minds in the undergraduate body 
have expressed themselves against this 
proposed action. It is not old-fogeyism 
to support worth-while and unsurpassed 
traditions. 

We heartily indorse the sentiment ex- 
pressed in the communication which 
appears elsewhere in this issue. 



The matches scheduled for this week 
arc with the Univ. of Nebraska and with 
the Univ. of Dayton, Ohio. 



The land boom has hit the campus 
Building lots for sale in front of Stock 
bridge, Monday. 

P 

Mills crashed the gate again at the 
B.A.A. meet. His average is now 1.000. 

P 

Julius Carlson got plastered this last 
week end. 

P 

Dick Grower took a ckaperonc to the 

Informal Saturday. 

Freddie Thayer doesn't know whether 
or not he rates in the Home Kc. office. 



Frank S. Tucker '22 is doing mission- 
ary work under the American Board in 
Coimbra, Portugal, and expects to be 
able to undertake vsork in Inhainb.iiic, 
Africa, this summer. 



Julian S. Rea '17 is working as a 
missionary for the Methodist Church in 
Inhambane, Africa Oriental. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 1927 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Gerry Amstein is the author of the 
remark that the Hills Botanical Prize 
will be a welcome addition to the family- 
furniture fund. 



Bill Hart dared a merry ride when he 
went to the Informal with a black eye. 



It is rumored that Romeo and Juliet 
will entertain between the halves of the 
W.P.I, game. 



S. F. Hamblin '12 is the author of an 
illustrated article in the last number of 
Horticulture which tells all about plants 
which may be grown on stepping-stone 
walks. 



Donald C. Douglas '22 is adjuster of 
the Travelers' Insurance Co. in Boston. 



Malcolm D. Campbell '14 is Junior 
Master in the department of science at 
the Dorchester High School for Boys. 



Word has been received that the 
requisition for band instruments has 
been approved and that the instrument s 
are on their way here. 



The Seniors who are taking Military 
are now studying Military Law. This 
week there is to be a mock trial. There 
should l>e many good (?) lawyers as a 
result of these classes. 



Efforts are being made to turn the 
room in which the band instruments are 
now kept into a band library in which 
the music might be kept and systemati- 
cally arranged. 



Some excellent material has been found 
in the Freshman class for next year's 
rifle team. 



After worrying all week end about 
that date, Stan Hall missed the train by 
two minutes. 

Coach Derby made the fastest time of 
the evening at the B.A.A. meet — taxi-ing 
for the train. 



Charlie Ross, Tom Dooley and Yossman 
attended the meet and lunched with the 
team after. 



TWO YEAR PERSONALS 



ONE WORD MORE 

We fear that the principle we were 
trying to establish in last week's editorial 
"Honor versus Environment" may have 
been somewhat blurred by the personality 
of our instance. The principle is this: 
the class which is allowed to become lax 
in lecture and laboratory will also tend 
to become lax in the examination room. 
This obviously imposes an unfortunate 
strain and burden upon the honor system 
and the honor committee. However we 
did not mean to question the decision of 
that committee; on the contrary we 
commend both its courage and its judg- 
ment. Nor did we intend to emphasize 
the scholastic laxity of a particular class- 
room. The principle applies to every 
classroom on the campus anil is exempli- 
fied in varying de g r ee! in a good many 
of them. The accident of event made a 
particular classroom a useful instance at 
this time. Let us repeat our principle 
once more for final emphasis, tins time 
positively: the higher the scliolastic 
standards in the classroom the higher 
the standard of honor in examination. 



ATHLETIC AND ACADEMIC 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Parsons '27 of Amherst, Musical Clubs; 
Neil C. Robinson '27 of Arlington Heights, 
Roister Doisters; and Lewis H. Whitaker 
'27 of Hadley, Collegian and Musical 
Clubs. 

The names of those who received silver 
medals are as follows: Donald H. Camp- 
bell '27 of Shirley, Roister Doisters; 
Kenneth W. Milligan '27 of State Line, 
Index; John E. White '27, Collegian and 
Orchestra; and Kenneth A. Bartlett '28 
of Dorchester, Roister Doisters. 

Dean William L. Machmer represented 
the Athletic Board in presenting the 
awards in the various sports. Awards in 
football were made as follows: captain's 
certificate to William G. Amstein '27 of 
South Deerfield; player's certificates and 
sweaters to Andrew B. Anderson '27 of 
Hudson, Lewis H. Black '27 of Williams- 
burg, Carlton O. Cartwright '27 of 
Northampton, Robert W. McAllister *27 
of North Billerica, John J. Mahoney '27 
of Westfield, Joseph A. Malley '27 of 
Watertown, E. Lincoln Murdough '27 
of Springfield, Albert L. Spelman '27 of 
New London, Conn., Richard C. Kelton 
'28 of Hubbardston, John F. Quinn '28 
of New Bedford, Warren J. Tufts '28 of 
Jamaica Plains, Robert L. Bowie '29 of 
East Milton, Clifton R. Johnson '29 of 
Worcester, Kenneth F. McKittrick '29 
of Boston, Taylor M. Mills '29 of Boston, 
and Charles E. Walkden '29 of Swansea. 

A cross-country sweater was awarded 
to Charles P. Preston '28 of Hathorne 
and a captain's certificate to Clarence A. 
Crooks '27 of North Brookfield. Daniel 
C. Hanson '27 and Frank Stratton '28, 
managers of football and cross-country 
respectively, rece iv ed manager's certifi- 
cates. Baseball certificates were given 
to Raymond G. Griffin '27 of Southwick 
and Robert E. Moriarty '28 of Monson, 
and a manager's certificate to William L. 
Dole '27 of Medford. 



The following column of personal items 
about members of the Short Course will 
be run from now on in much the same 
way as the Personal column in reference 
to the four-year students has been run. 
If you have something on your friends 
hand it either to the Short Course editor, 
or to one of the representatives from the 
Two- Year course, but let the items that 
have news value predominate over those 
that are merely slams. 



Faculty parties are as a rule very 
pleasant affairs and the party held last 
Saturday night in the Memorial Build- 
ing was no exception, either from the 
point of view of the number present, or 
the kind of a time those present had. The 
committee in charge of this party was 
headed by Prof, and Mrs. Fred C. Sears. 
St. Yalentine furnished the inspiration 
for the decorations which were appro- 
priate for the season. Bates' Collegians 
furnished the music and eleven baskets 
of apples helped to keep every one in 
good spirits. 



CO-ED NEWS 

Last Thursday afternoon, Mrs. George 
I . ( rocker, president of the New England 
branch of the Women's Farm and Garden 
Association, gave a lecture on her visit 
to the Orient and illustrated her talk with 
motion pictures of the coronation of the 
present king of Siam which she and her 
husband took. The organization of 
which Mrs. Crocker is president has 
shown a great deal of interest in the 
Aggie co-eds by furnishing the living 
room of the dormitory and materially 
helping to make the Abbey a comfortable 
place for the girls. 



The seniors have been objecting to the 
"hair raising" activities of the freshmen 
and have to cut short these proceedings. 
All of which means that the freshmen 
believe in keeping a stiff upper lip. 



Will some kind soul please inform us 
concerning the origin of Pulsifer's nick- 
name "Hope"? Possibly he has lost 
Faith. 



When it comes to "sheiking" Bergman 
is pretty much in the dark. Figure out 
the connection in that one Seroy. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

We note with interest that three o>-cds 
are out for Freshman detvtfnp We 



Cornie has developed a keen interest 
in hockey, cherchez l'homme. 



Plans are being completed for the co-ed 
Prom which will take place next week end 
on February 18 and 19 under the auspices 
of the Delta Phi Gamma Sorority. This 
is the second year in which the women 
students of the College have set aside a 
week end for festivities which include a 
formal dance in Memorial Hall on Friday 
evening and a tea dance at the Amherst 
Women's Club House the following after- 
noon. The formal dance will begin at 5.30 
o'clock and last till 1 a. m., while the tea 
dance will continue from 3 to 9 o'clock. 
President and Mrs. Edward M. Lewis and 
Mr. and Mrs. Huthsteiner will chaperone 
the formal dance. 



Janet has been very active in risking 
life for limb in the Pomology pruning lab. 



For Izzy, Westfield has its charms, but 
then what hasn't? 



Frank Smith gets up at 2 o'clock with- 
out much persuasion to wait on table at 
the hash house. 



We are all wondering why "Rollie" 
Smith does not like Girl's Glee Clubs. 
Solution: Ask "Rollie"! 



VALENTINES 

including many 

NOVELTY BOXES 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



cannot keep them out of 
activities if we would. ^ 

at hit tics? Why not? 

* * * 

All those who attended t 
Saturday were much plea* 
Women's Club, except the 
the Inform. d Committee. 



IIS 

\t. 



nal 

the 

of 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

Prof. Robert J. Fall, Research Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Economics, is now 
on a six months leave of absence lieginning 
January 1, to do special work for the 
1. S. Dept. of C o mmer ce. At present the 
Doctor is located in Boston but he expect* 
to be assigned a position in California 
shortly. He also expects to return to 
the station about the first of July. 



Director Willard A. Munson of the 
Extension Service Staff, Director Sidney 
B. Haskell of the Experiment Station, 
Prof. Fayette H. Branch, Extension 
Professor of Animal Husbandry, Prof. 
Mighell of the Experiment Staff, Prof. 
Lorian P. Jefferson, Assistant Professor 
of Agricultural Economics, and Prof. 
Hubert W. Yount, Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Economics, attended the 
meeting of the New England Research 
Council. This Council brings together 
Economists and Agriculturalists. The 
meeting was for the preparation of the 
New England "Agricultural Outlook" 
rc|>ort. Director Munson is president 
of the Council. 



New Amherst Theatre 

Amherst's only amusement house 
offering daily amusement service. 
Matinee* duly at 3. Erening. 6:45 ami 8: 30 

Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 7-8. 

Raymond (high hat) Griffith in 
"YOU'D BE SURPRISED." 
A late Pathe News and a tuxedo 
two reel Comedy. 



The ( "Mh.un is at all times glad to publish 
any oommunJ( it ions which may In- >«ut to it, but 
the Kditor- will seauM no responsibility for the 
view- npreaead, and do not necessarily endoi 
mch views. 

To the Editor of the Collegian — 

From reliable sources conies the news 
that there is a concerted movement, on 
the part ol several influential members of 
the faculty, to do away with all required 
foreign language courses in the four-year 
curriculum. 1 say "four-year" advisedly, 
because this action seems to be attempt- 
ing to make the two-year and four-year 
courses identical, does it not? 

The results of such an action would 
•teas to be fairly plain. Having no re- 
quired language courses in the curriculum, 
the question will soon be raised, "Why 
have language included in the entrant 
requirements?" Down drops the stand- 
ard of the college another step! Other 
colleges, learning that we require no 
language for a B.S. degree, will soon 
question every B.S. degree obtained at 
this college. For, will it not be reason- 
able for these other colleges to assume, 
that, as we have no required language 
courses, the language department must 
be, necessarily, weak? Any student wish- 
ing to do graduate work at other college- 
will find great difficulty in obtaining 
recognition. 

It must be plain that among the nic 
bers of the faculty there is a wide diver- 
gence of opinion as to the purpose of 
this college. But does not the two-year 
course, as it now stands, provide the 
training which these advocates of a 
lower four-year standard are demanding? 
After all, the college is granting a Bache- 
lor's degree for four years' work. And, as 
this is a scientific degree, can there be 
any field of science in which a knowledge 
of some foreign language is not requisite? 
To look at the question from the 
broadest viewpoint possible, does it not 
seem plain that, with the highly de- 
veloped means of communication now 
existing between every country in the 
world, a knowledge of foreign languages 
is becoming more and more a necessary 
acquirement of every man, let alone 
college men? 

It is disagreeable to think that mem- 
bers of the faculty of a college, — a body 
which exists by and for the students of 
that college, — should be so shortsighted 
and inconsiderate of the future welfare 
of those students to deprive them of an 
acquirement which may be of tremendous 
value to them at some future time! And 
regardless of the profound mentalities of 
such faculty members; they have not the 
power to foretell the lives of every gradu- 
ate of this institution, saying to this one, 
"Come, you will need French in your 
thirtieth year", or to another, "You will 
never use other than your mother tongue". 
Rather absurd, isn't it? 

Discussing the question with a good 
friend of mine, he ventured to liken our 
state of affairs to a condition obtaining 
in Alice's Looking-Glass World, the 
students trying to raise the standard of 
the college, while members of the faculty 
tried to lower it! Was there ever a more 
topsy-turvy state of affairs? 

1 do not voice the opinions of myself 
alone, Mr. Editor. Every student I have 
questioned concerning this movement is, 
with no exaggeration, amazed at the 
audacity of these professors! 

The danger of such a change scein> 
imminent. It is therefore essential that 
every student who agrees with the view- 
point of this letter add his coive to the 
protest, which, I venture to hope, will 
shortly be universal. 

//. J. Harris "27 



Wednesday & Thursday, Feb. 9- 10. 

Ricardo Cortez and Betty Bronson 

"THE CATS PAJAMAS." 
A Bruce short subject and two reel 
Comedy. 

Friday & Saturday, Feb. 11-12. 

Leon Errol (of Follies fame) in 
"THE LUNATIC AT LARGE." 
A late Pathe News and a Dooley 
two reel Comedy. 



COMING ATTRACTIONS 

(!:ira Bow in "IT." 

Adolphc Menjou in "SORROWS OF SATAN ' 

Shirley Mason in "SWEET ROSIE 

O GRADY. ' 
Bcbe Daniels in "STRA NDED IN P ARIS. 

Whea Salter pictures are made tkty'B be «a«w» 
■t tat New Amhtnt Theatre. 



You will find an eicellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . • 

equipped with the moat up-to-date Goodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at 11) Amity-St.. - Opp. New Theatre 

W* understand your requirtments and are t"' 

pared to meet your needs. - 

A U work guaranteed. Shoes skintd and dyed. «* 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop- 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up o-e Sight) 

Ocullate Preecrlptlone PlUnd. Broken len**» 
accurately replaced 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICES fJ jj 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heela • - ' Vjj 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels • • • 2 J0 

Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels • ' , t | 

Men's Half Solea ' 

Work Guaranteed— Corner of Pleasant and 
Amity Sts. Open till 8 P. M. 



I llCKcY-nKcfcMAiN SUltS are the finest obtainable in Great Britain. They embrace comfort, style, fit and exclusiveness of 
costly custom built clothes. THOMAS F. WALSH 

MORE THAN A TOGGERY— A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



DNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



If we have your size: 

Tan and Black Scotch Grain Bostonian 
Oxfords, Wing Tip, $10.00 and $11.00 
Values $7.85. 

Look in our window, come in and try 
a pair on. 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



INTKRERATERNITY BASkhTUAl 1 








RKS11TS 










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SUMMARY 










Team 


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1.000 




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20 


A. G. R. 


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77 



An example of dogged jtersislency and 
faith in overcoming a physical handicap, 
a one-handed football player lias earned 
a guard position on the University of 
Southern California's grid team. He is 
heralded as being one of the best and 
fastest guards in the west. 



Student assent has Iteen given to the 
proposal to do away with lectures at 
Rollins College, Florida. The innovation 
was proposed by I'lesidtnt Hamilton Holt, 
former editor of The Independent. 

Instead of coming to classes for lectures 



the atudeaU will alW'iul to study. Tin 

usual c>() minute period will be lengthened 

to two hours. The atUfatntl will studv m 
cfaUMea under guidance u( the professor 

and in ooaataal conaultatioa with him 
"the purpose being to place academic life 
on .i mora practical lu-is I •> placing cJass 

attendance on .1 par with the hours and 
duties of a bttahatti ollice." 

A majority ot the students were favor- 
ably impressed with the idea; some obyM 
ttOM, however, were railed. The principle 
doilbtl were as follows: "I'rofessois who 
have not adapted themselves to the 
(hanged condition and make use of the 

two-hour period to deliver an extended 

lecture, outside work continuing as be- 
fore; the problem of the working student 
and that of the athlete who suifcrs from 
ovcrst ulfed schedules; the necessarily 

doubled number ol oooiUcts, with their 

attendant inconveniences, as well as the 
uncomfortable and impractical conditions 
of some recitation rooms. A more serious 
|M)int raised was the question of whether 
or not so radical a change in college pro- 
cedure would affect I he standing of 
Rollins in academic circles." 



The first retreat t ver given to co-eds 
at the University of Detroit was held 

recently. This religious devotion in said 
to have dm) with area! success. 



Religious Census 

Results Announced 



Congregational 
Membership. 



Church Leads in 



A religious census of the College for 
the year 15*26-1927 has just been made 
public by Khner E. Barber, Intcrchurch 



Student Secretary. The census coven 

the enrollment in IhjIIi the four-year and 
two-year courses. There are represented 
among the undergraduates of the ( ollegC 
sixteen different religious denominations. 
Of these various sects the Congregational 
Church claims the largest enrollment with 
232, which is practically one-third of the 
enrollment of the College. 

The complete census is as follows: 



Denominations 

bers 

Atlvrnliat 1 

Baptist 3H 

Community Church .... S 

< (ill KttK.it inn.il 132 

Christian Science h 

Kvaniiclical 1 

Krienda 1 

Jewish 15 

Lutheran 8 

Methodist Episcopal . . . . 3U 



Four- Year 
Stem- I're/er- 



Two- Year 
Mem- Prefer- 



Total 
Strm- Prefer- 



Presbyterian . 
Protestant Episcopal 
Relormetl Church Dutch 
Roman Catholic 
t'nitarian .... 
1 nivcrsalist 
Miscellaneous . 
No Preference . 



S 

M 
l 

HO 

IN 
4 


I 



TOTALS 388 



ente 


I 

3 

46 

1 
I 


I 
10 

7 

o 
11 

7 

6 

35 

134 



bers 


10 


24 

I 



1 



2 
s 

■ 

L'.'i 
4 
I 



87 



fin e 

<t 


M 
I 
i 
o 



1 

7 
1 

t) 
(l 
I 
5 
5 
11 

79 



bers 

1 
48 
5 
156 
7 
1 

2 

15 

10 

47 

8 

43 

1 

105 

22 

I 





475 



ente 

17 
3 
76 
1 
1 



1 

2 

17 

1 

13 



O 

14 

12 

11 

46 

HI 



(it and 
lt,t.il 

1 
65 

8 
•232 

8 

2 

2 
16 
12 
64 

7 
56 

I 
in:. 
36 
18 
11 
46 

0XK 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

3.00. 
7.30 



Friday 

3.00 
4.45, H..U) 



Saturday 
.«. OS 

6.45 s tu 



Another double hill An- 
lonhi Moreno and Kiiiic 
Adoii't- In 

"I hs ll.imlini Korc.it" 
< .in.i.i.i » in-ii lb. noriliwa 
mounted lirst . .line la the 
m.iic of this 1. 1^ Curuood 

■tory. I'litins Romance. 
Ittit) v* love. taeaaattoaM 
(oreol tne. humors and .ol • 
v en t ii resoK in nad la n pioneer 
da> a. Ami — 

Left) Hwui the \ ale half- 
back in ''The College Boob." 

A ulnrlitlls i ometlv of i ollei>e 
life, a romance of the caiii- 

Rua. Piimeal atnry h> Kl>iui. 
cwa and tabic* Keii I'ricea 



"BsraSatn the Mutlnlllcent" 
John Gilbert, a jjre.it a tar on 
the screen, here achieve*. 
n. w triumphs In a purl juat 
built for him. You'll adore 
him aa the Sreut Milliter, 
lirealer liner, In this epic M 
romance, Intrigue and dm •■- 
dc\ll adventure. 
Spiirtllilhl Comedy 



"The I'imii's Toll," never 
a dull moment, action all 
the time. A thousand and 
one Mollis The bunt for 
i;oii| In the desert, (be d 
- i rad 
a girl. . 

Rrey. Amu/.lng riding 
CMS 



*■•■»> ... .■«*- wi>scii, nic ueft- 

P< rudoea altu< k . betrayed hy 
a girl, the deaert foiled of Ita 

ing riding. 

2 -Reel Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

PATHEX- -I'etsoual Movies. You no 

through c o lleg e but once, Got sone last- 
ing living records as yoU see it. (.el ,i 

PATHEX MOVING CAMERA at 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

RKAR AMIIrKVr RANK 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south of campus. 
Telephone 511 



SPECIAL SALE ! 



EVERYTHING AT DISCOUNT. 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



VALENTINES for Sweethearts and Mothers 



It's red like an apple 
And shaped like a top 

And when you are near 
It goes flippity flop! 



You're a peach 
I do declare 

If you'll have me 
We'll be a pear. 



To Get the Best, Buy 

"MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers — Step-Ins— Vests 

Combinations 



SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Order your Tuxedo early for Fraternity banquets. 

A new and complete stock o, Tu*edo shirts, ties and accessories on hand. Remember we are selling suits and overcoats at close out prices. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



-JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



SING LEE HANP LA " NPKY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Meai 

Our Laundry Flrat Cleea 

Our Pelicjr Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Oppoaite Pout Office 



SPECIAL SALE 

TO Mir: AGf.lK MEN 

Step In and get a pair of C.llrflr Otfordaol 
our brand new numbers we received recently. 

Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STOKE 



STETSON HATS -We e S pect you to ccme in for your ^ 

»IH be a source of satisfaction. Our selection of Stetson na 

exeter CARL H. BOLTER 

EXEIkK AMHERST 



Stetson, tomorrow, next week, and for months after. The Stetson you buy today 



HYANNIS 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9, 1927 



FAST WILLIAMS FIVE 

(Continued from pafte 1) 

basket bv I'ailciihcimer completed the 

■coring. 

The Agates ii«l<l the ball ■ greater 
portion <>f the thne, aad erhea tl«<- vieteore 
were enticed <«it <>f their defensive i«>si 
tioni iii the second half, the stage was 
■el for Reed's work, "koly" also featured 
with clever defensive work, as did "Kay" 




YE AGGIE INN 



Bean Contest 



YE AGGIE INN 



OPKN TO \I.I.-One chance with every 25 cent purchase in the store- (Not including candy or tobacco. 

A chance to win a $5.00 Fountain Pen, $3.50 Pipe or $2.50 of valuable merchandise. 

CONTKST Closes March 1, 1927 - - - Cigar orders filled for fraternity banquets 



Griffin and Partenhehner. Shuiiiway aad 

/.inn starred for the losers. Numerous 
"hard luck" shots which refused to 
penetrate the net kept down the score 
for both teams. The score: 

M.A.C. Williams 

1, f. I'. »• I'"- !'• 

kn-,1, If 4 2 10 Wright, rg 

Griffin, ri 2 2 Mc-ehan.ru 

Thomas, c - 1 8 Sterling, lg 

Munlougli. Ig Zinn. c 
Part'heimer, rg I 4 Fowler, c 

Shuiiiway, rf 

Brown. If 

llethan, If 



1 1 
2 4 

1 2 


2 1 5 

12 4 



NEW EQUIPMENT IN 

DAIRY DEPARTMENT 



income Substitute 

The substitute player will take 
the regular player's place when 
needed. 

So will our Life Income Policy 
take the place of your income 
when needed, for it will pay 
you $100 monthly whenever 
disabled, and at age 65 any- 
way for the rest of your life. 

Your family shares in the pro- 
tection, too. for should you 
die young, the Income Policy 
will pay them $10,000. 

Write for booklet, "Pension 
Yourself". 

Connecticut General 
Life InsuranceCompany 

ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1873- M 
Greenfield, Mae*. 



Totals 8 5 21 Total* 6 4 16 

Referee— Whalen. Time— 20-minute halves. 



SONG CONTEST AROUSES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the campus, including Alpha Gamma 
Rho, Alpha Sigma Phi, Kappa Epsilon 
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi 
Sigma Kappa, Q.T.V., Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Theta Chi, will be represented in the 
contest and keen competition is expected. 
Each fraternity taking part will be re- 
quired to sing two songs, and, since 
many of the houses having held re- 
hearsals during the last week or two, 
much may be expected of them. 

Mr. Sidney B. Haskell, Chairman of 
the Academic Activities Board, will be 
the presiding officer of the event, while 
the judges will include Mrs. Chas. S. 
Tillson of Amherst, Mr. Chas. W. Cobb 
of Amherst College, and Mr. Alexander 
Richter of Amherst High School. 

The contest will be held immediately 
after the hockey game in the afternoon, 
which will probably be about four o'clock, 
in Bowker Auditorium. 



The Dairy Department has installed a 
COtnpteU new pasteurizing unit which 
gives them the most up-to-date method. 
This new unit, in addition to the older 
equipment, enables the de p a rtmen t to 
offer one of the best Market Milk courses 
given in any of the colleges. 

The department is also expecting a 
new direct expansion ice cream freezer 
for use in its ice cream courses. This is 
considered a very important acquisition 
in that the problem of direct expansion 
versus brine freezing is one of the most 
important in the ice cream industry at 
the present time. Very few of the various 
dairy departments in the country are 
equipped with both types of freezers. 

All of the new equipment is operated 
by direct motors and it is the plan of 



the department to motorize all of its 

equipment in the near future. This will 
do away with all belts and shafting and 
will greatly improve the apiH-arance and 
sanitary conditions of the plant. 



K. Waller Hurlburt 'IK and Bena < '•. 
Erhard '19 (now Mrs. William P. Susan), 
recently received gold medal awards from 
the Massachusetts State Department of 
Agriculture. Mr. Hurlburt is the owner 
of a prospering dairy farm at Ashley Falls, 
Mass., and is a leader in the agricultural 
activities of Berkshire County. The 
award to Mrs. Williams was made in 
recognition of her outstanding work in 
the Extension Service. 





*i jfaJ*T 


1*0 




™" 





As a mark of distinction at Brigham 
Young University, the seniors will wear 
blue cords, ranger hats, and blue blazers 
trimmed with white, and a blue cane. 



WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 



275 High St., Holyoke 



fh^College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakee, Freeh Fruite, Refreahment. and Soda.. 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALLJUNPS 

ICE CREAM FOrTwSTrATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

-THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 




IW^v 



[Impeding and admiring the new car] 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



"Speaking of fine tobaccos 
— Have a Camel! 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



yy 



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Camels are an expression of aU And wherever experienced smok- 
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smokers gather. The best of Turk- say: "Speaking of fine tobaccos 
ish and Domestic tobaccos are ... Have a Camel!" 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



©1927 



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Slu* iMafiflarliiwtts (EnUrmatt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16, 1927 



Professor Patterson is 

Reader at Social Union 

Large Audience Entertained by Interpretation 
of "Rip Van Winkle" 



Any doubts which may have been 
entertained concerning Professor Charles 
H. Patterson's reputation as a reader were 
speedily dispelled last Friday night by 
the reading he rendered for Social Union. 
The program consisted of some readings 
from "Rip Van Winkle", made famous 
by Joseph Jefferson, the great American 
comedian. It was Jefferson who produced 
the first dramatic version of Washington 
Irving's "Rip Van Winkle", and acted 
in the production with great success, 
particularly in the role of Rip, both in 
this country and abroad. Professor 
Patterson has studied Jefferson very 
carefully and so is peculiarly well-fitted 
to do justice to the characters. The 
scenes were acted out most realistically, 
giving new life to the legend. It almost 
seemed as though the old characters 
were there in flesh and blood, and that 
they were actually speaking from the 
stage. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



juniors and Freshmen 

Plan Class Smokers 



Former Set for Friday Night. 
Date of Other Undecided. 



At the class meetings last Wednesday, 
the Junior class voted to conduct a 
Smoker on Friday evening, the 18th. 
The committee elected to take charge of 
the arrangements consists of: Ellsworth 
Barnard, chairman; Frank F. Homeyer, 
and Douglas W. Lc.-ing. 

The Freshman class also voted to run 
a Smoker at a date which is to be decided 
upon later. The following are in charge 
of the affair: Raymond S. Mann, George 
H Barney, and Paul T. Ph'-mey. The 
following are the leaders of the eight 
groups of the class which are to put on 
acts at the Social: Group 1, Ellert; 
2, Crane; 3, Tiffany; 4, Donovan; 5, Pyle; 
6, Cleveland; 7, Cox; and 8, L. A. Howard. 
At the meeting the names of those who 
are in the various groups were read off 
and the ones in the groups should get in 
touch with their group leader. 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA WINS 
INTERFRATERNITY SING 



Q. T. V. and Theta Chi Receive 
Honorable Mention. 



Debating Team 
Opens Thursday 

George Washington University is 
First Opponent. 



The M.A.C. varsity debating team will 
have its first opportunity to demonstrate 
its forensic powers on next Thursday 
night against George Washington Uni- 
versity. The debate will take place at 
X p. m. in the Memorial Building. 

The visitors, who have a veteran team, 
will attempt to demonstrate to the satis 
(action of their worthy opponents that 
the (Jutted States should cancel the war 
debts owed to her by European nations, 
while the Aggie team will make a patri- 
otic attempt to defend the present atti- 
tude of the President and Congress, by 
showing why it would be a dire mistake 
for this country to heed the pleas of the 
cancellationists in regard to said debts. 

The only representative in this debate 
of the team which represented M.A.C. so 
"iiccissfully last year is Ralph W. Haskins 
-'<", but no one who is acquainted with 
his two colleagues, Herbert J. Harris '27, 
and Maxwell II. Cold berg '28, can doubt 
their ability to hold up their end of the 
argument. 

Last Friday evening the Freshmen 
engaged >n a dual debate with Williston 
Academy, on the proposition of the re- 
moval of immigration restrictions. The 
"'en who upheld the affirmative, at home, 
•ere Theodore Marcus and Arthur B. 
■^'lerquist; the team which journeyed to 
'-a»thampton to uphold the negative was 
Composed of Carl A. Bergan and Kol)ert 
L Dickey. Their opponents, older and 
more experienced, evidently possessed a 
m '>re impressive line, for the Freshmen 
"i both cases lost the decision. Neverthe- 
!i ''~- their work showed much promise, 
an 'l indicated varsity possibilities for 
■ttt year. 



Phi Sigma Kappa won the right to 
retain the cup offered by the Academic 
Activities Board in the second annual 
interfraternity sing held last Saturday 
afternoon. Under the leadership of 
Howard Thomas '28, this fraternity gave 
a performance that would have done 
credit to any Glee Club, amassing a 
total of 286 points. The two songs 
rendered were "Boost Old Aggie" and 
Phi Sigma Kappa Song. 

First honorable mention was given to 
Q.T.V., which sang "When Twilight 
Shadows Deepen" and "Alma Mater", 
with a total of 244 points. The manner 
in which they sang the Alma Mater 
spoke well for the efforts of their leader, 
Edwin E. Marsh '2K, the song being sung 
in a very spirited manner. 

Theta Chi received second honorable 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 



AGGIE TRACKMEN 
GET INTO FORM 



Good Prospect h for Worcester Tech 
Meet Next Tuesday. 



The Aggie varsity track team will 
journey to Worcester on February 22 for 
its annual meet with VV.P.I. The Agates 
have won the last two meets, the score 
of last year's meet being 40-28. All the 
men on the team are shaping up well and 
they expect 10 bring a third consecutive 
victory back to M.A.C. 

Hall and Kay, who will carry the 
Maroon and White in the 300-yard dash, 
are coming along in splendid shape, while 
Schappelle and Foley are the hopes of 
Aggie in the 1000-yard run. Nottebaert, 
a star of last season's cross-country team, 
will make good use of his long legs in the 
600-yard run, and Hennelierry will make 
the mile his specialty. Rudquist and 
Dresser will represent M.A.C. in the 
shot put. Woodberry and Kreienbaum 
are starring in the high jump, while 
Mahoney will be de|>cnded on in the 
hurdles. Mahoney, Mills, and Kay are 
slated for the 30-yard dash. With tin- 
above named men showing much promise 
there is real hope of bringing another 
victory back from Worcester. 

The team will continue training after 
the meet with the Engineers in prepara- 
tion for the meet at the 104th regiment 
armory in Springfield on March 5. The 
Agates will take part in the 1800-yard 
relay race and will enter the open events 
also. Last year Hall qualified for the 
finals in the 300-yard dash, but unfor- 
tunately fell because of a collision during 
the first heat. Schappelle won fourth 
place in the 1000-yard run. Cups have 
been donated by several Springfield con- 
cerns for the winners of the mile, the 1000- 
yard, and the 300-yard ra< 



Collegian Will Be 

Sent to High Schools 

Action Taken As Part of New 
Publicity Campaign 



The College has undertaken a new 
means of bringing the benefits of the 
institution to the attention of high 
school students throughout Massachusetts. 
Last week a contract was drawn up and 
signed whereby in the future the Collegian 
will be sent to libraries of the leading high 
schools in the State. The COOtrad I alls 
lor 880 subscriptions and will go into 
effect at once. 

In making this move the Faculty 
Publicity Committee Cesb that this is the 
best way of showing high school students 
what the College is like and what it is 
doing. It will also call their attention to 
the activities of the undergraduates and 
to the student life in general. 



Teaching is Subject 

Of Assembly Speech 

Harry A. Gardner Discusses Work 
of the Teacher. 



In Assembly last Wednesday, Mr. 
Harry A. Gardner of the 1 >cpart incut of 
Education at Boston, set la-fore the 
student body the situation of (he teach 
ing profession in an effort to stimulate 
interest and to clarify the matter in the 
minds of all. His talk was directed cs- 
|K-cially at the men In-cause, he said, a 
boy of average school age needs for a 
teacher one who has beta through the 
same stages as he has so that he may be 
the better able to sympathize with him. 

The speaker explained the many quali- 
fications that one who intends to become 
a teacher must possess, and emphasized 
the value of a college training. 

Mr. Gardner said that a spirit of ser- 
vice is absolutely necessary to a success- 
ful career in teaching, and declared that 
it was from this that one obtained his 
greatest reward. He outlined the ad- 
vancements possible, from the position of 
teacher to superintendent, and cited 
examples of salaries to lie obtained. 



MANY AGGIE ALUMNI 
RETURN FOR BANQUETS 

Number is Nearly as Large as in 
Previous Years. 



Although last Saturday was not the 
official Mid- Winter Alumni Day, as has 
been the case for several years past, then- 
was, nevertheless, approximately the same 
number of alumni, who returned for the 
initiation banquets of the various fra- 
ternities. The hockey game with Williams 
which was scheduled for the afternoon, 
was cancelled but tin- Interfraternity 
Sing, which was held in Stockbridge Hall, 
more than made up for the cancelled 
game. 

In the evening the fraternity initiation 
banquets were in vogue. The Q.T.V. 
banquet was held at the house. Phi 
Sigma Kappa and Kappa Sigma were 
entertained at the Lord Jeffery Inn, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Alpha Gamma Kho, 
and Delta Phi Alpha motored to the 
Hotel Nonotuck in Holyoke. Alpha 
Sigma Phi and Lambda Chi Alpha held 
their banquets in Dra|)er Hall. Theta 
Chi journeyed to Hotel Kimball, Spring- 
field, Kappa Kpsilon to White House Inn, 
Northampton, and Kappa Gumma Phi 
to Colonial Inn, Amherst. 

The alumni attendance nearly equalled 
that of last year even though there was 
no scheduled alumni program as in pre- 
vious years. As far as could lx- deter- 
mined the oldest class to be represented 
is that of 1870 by Dr. Joseph E. Root of 
Phi Sigma Kappa. The accurate list of 
those returning is not available but 
among those present from out of town 
(Continued on Page I) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"7o speak evil of anyone unless there are 
une/uivarai proofs of their deserving it, is 
an injury for irhi'h there is no ale, unit 
re; oration." — George Washington. 



Wednesday — 

Varsity basketball: W.P.I, at M.A.C. 

:5. 1 j Assembly, I'lii Kappa I'ni Assembly. 

Prof. Fred F. Cooley It. 
Girls' Olee Club Concert at Leeds. 
Thursday— 

faa V— | basketball: 

( lark S IkxjI of Hanover. N. II.. here, 
(■iris' Clee Club Concert at Odd PMkHM 

Mall, Amherst. 
Interfraternity basketball: 

Alpha Sigma I'hi vs. Theta Chi 

Kappa Camma I'hi vs. Non-Fraternity 
Varsity .lel.ate: 

Gsafgi Washington Cniv., here. 
Friday 

Varsity basketball: 

Wesleyan .it Middh town 
Interfraternity basketball: 

Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa Sigma 

Alpha Camina Kho vs. Sigma Phi Kpsilon 
fulfil Dance. Delta Phi OsmSM, at Mem. 

Building from M0 P m to 1 p. m. 
Junior CaM Smoker. So< ial Union Room, 

7 :',0 p. in. 
Saturday 
:i <»o p tn T'-.i I'm'-, AamfesM Wss 

t Tub. 
Sunday — 

1.10 ;> in- Sunday Oaafat, Bishop William 

l- Aadtrsoa, Msldta , Mass. 
Tucsd ay- 
Indoor track meet: W.P.I, at Worcester. 
Cirls' Glee Club Concert at F^asthampton. 



Second Half Drive 

Wins I 



Maroon and White Overcomes 
Sensational Rally 



Number 17 



I r Agates 

2 Lead by 



LAST HOCKEY GAMES 

ARE CANCELLED 



Team Has Played Only Seven of 
Thirteen Scheduled Games. 



After a conference with the coach and 
captain of the hockey team, Professor 
Hicks, head of the Athletic Department, 
has decided to cancel the remaining 
hockey games on the schedule. Lack of 
practice and poor ice make this decision 
necessary. This ruling will result in the 
omission of the contest with Springfield 
listed for February 17, and also the 
return encounter with Amherst at their 
rink on the 22. The two games that were 
to have been played last week with 
Williams and New Hampshire were also 
cancelled because of adverse weather 
conditions. 

The Vermont game will therefore go 
down in the records as the final encounter 
of the l'.'_'7 .season, in which only seven 
out of thirteen scheduled contests were 
played. Of these, the Agates won the 
(Continued on Paga 2) 



PRESS CLUB IS 
ALREADY ACTIVE 



Contact Made With Forty 
Massachusetts Papers 



The results of the Press Club's activi- 
ties are now beginning to show, according 
to the numerous clippings which are 
being received by the secretary of the 
Faculty Publicity Committee trom vari- 
ous newspa|K-rs. Although the Club has 
been organized but three weeks, it is 
now completely established and contact 
has iH-en made with practically all the 
leading papers in Massachusetts. At 
present the Club is limiting its reporting 
to forty papers. 

There arc now nine active members of 
the Club in addition to the faculty ad- 
visors and it is because of their work that 
the group is meeting with such good 
results. Those who are engaged in tin- 
work at present are Maurice A. Cum- 
n.ings '27 of Cambridge, William L. Dole 
'■27 of Me.lford, Robert W. McAllister '27 
of North Billerica, Frank Stratton '2K of 
Boston., William A. Ilgan '29 of Spring- 
held, Ed«Md H. Nichols '29 of Mont 
pefacr, Vt., Lloyd <-. Williams "2<i of 
I'ittslicld, John II. I'enton '30 of Win- 
throp, and John If. Leonard '.'10 of Fall 
River. 



Rallying in the second half mi outscor- 
ing their opi>oncnts, 2. r > to 5, the Agates 
tinned seeming defeat into victory and 
overcame Trinity, 27 to 17, at Hartford 
last Tuesday after trailing by a score of 
I to 12 in the first period. The Blue and 
Cold defense did not allow the visitors 
to score a single floor goal in the first 
half, foul shots by Griffin and Keed being 
the only M.A.C. tallies. On the Other 
hand, the Trinity players penetrated the 
Aggie defense quite successfully. 

The first period saw both teams playing 
a deliberate type of offensive, the main 
difference being that the Agates could not 
sink their shots, and Eberuold, the 
Trinity center, was particularly adept at 
dropping in the long ones. 

The M.A.C. quintet returned with 
renewed vigor in the second half, how- 
ever, and tallied three times on their 
first four shots at the hoop. "Roly" Keed 
first sank one from the corner, and Capt. 
"Part" tossed in the sphere from under 
the basket. Reed added another from the 
other side of the court, and the rush was 
on. Captain Parteuheimer and the 
'Continued on Paga 4) 



Frosh Take Measure of 

Wilbraham Academy 

Visitors, Outclaaaed Fail to Score 
in First Half. 



The Freshman quintet were victors 
over Wilbraham Academy by a 27-7 
score in a hard-fought game played in 
the Drill Hall Monday afternoon. The 
Frosh piled up thirteen point* during the 
first half, while Wilbraham failed to score. 
In the laat half however the visitors fought 
hard and raised their count to seven, 
though still decidedly outclassed by the 
Freshmen. The summary: 



FKk.MIMEN 

It F. P 



Two-Year Quintet 

Loses to Drury High 



Suffers Second Defeat of Season by 
18—11 Score. 



The Two- Year basketball team was 
defeated for the second time this season 
last Saturday in a hotly contested game 
with Drury High on the letter's home 
floor. Coming out on the short end of a 
store of IH-ll. The game started aus- 
piciously for the Tern-Yean who wen- 
leading 2-1 at the end of the lit -a quarter. 
I he next period however, was a eery 

sin cessful one for the Drury team which 
was ahead 13-3 at half time, a lead whii h 
the visitors were unable to ovenome, 
although they out scored their O p p onen ts' 
X .'. in the last half. 



Kneelaml, If 
Bernard. If 
Kurbank, rf 
Morawski. rf 



Stanisiewski. ■ I .' I 

Mann. Ig 2 2 

I'aksarlan, rg 3 17 

Mall, rg O 



WN.HKAIIAM 

aV K. P. 

7 Seil.-t.|lil,t, if 1 1 

2 Keith. If 1 1 | 

I Smith. If Oil 

1 2 

Kite, rg I) O I) 

Unit . rg O O 



3 1 

I | 

I I 

I I Pruuty, c 



Totals 10 7 27 Totals 2 3 7 

K.I. ma Ain-a.in Time H minute iirrloda. 



Quintet Faces 
Two Hard Games 



Meets W.P.I, in Drill Hall Tonight. 
Wesleyan There on Friday. 



The Mimmary: 










TWO 


YF.AKS 

■ | P 


DRt KY 


KM 

1! 


II 
1 


p 


Psrasas, ri 


l J 


.V i >-tta. Ig 








II 


Pitta, if 


1 2 


N ester, Ig 


1 


II 


2 


ii'iii.ni'1. i 


1 I ■ 


Aslikart. rg 


1 


1 




Butters, rg 


1 1 


Washburn I 


1 


~ 


s 


( li.n >-. Ig 


Q 


Nassif. If 


1 


1 


1 






Hi. ks. If 


II 


I) 









S< ully. rf 


1 





1 






We* h. rf 












Total* I 4 11 Total. 7 4 IS 

Referee — Dunn. Time ten-minute periods. 



"Kid" f. ore's M.A.C. h<»ormters fat* a 
difficult week, for two strong opponents, 

Worcester let h and Weeieyaa, are on the 

bill of fare. The Lngineers come to 
M.A.C for their contest tonight, while 
i In Agates will journey to Mildletown, 
( 'on it., on Friday to clash with the 
si -i ond mrinlier tif the "Little Three". 

Worcester |e. h Imasts a hustling 
quintet which includes such stars as 
Kauha, a forward, Craham, frosh center, 
aad Captain Harris, guard. I lie l.ngin- 
.. i have defeated litthbtirg Normal, 
Trinity, Upaala, Brooklyn Polyteih, and 
(lark, and have only lost to the strong 
Springfield College five and to Harvard. 

Wesleyan ha^ a winning team whit h 
has defeated Amherst, but was ovenome 
by Williams on the Williamstowii iourt. 

Tin- Middletowneia »<!<■ without the 

service* ol tbeil star raptain "Dune" 
|a< k, in this contest, however. They 
have won victories over Norwich, Brown, 
Middlebury, Amherst, Trinity, I psala, 
and I lifts. 

The Mass. Aggie team has high hopes 
of <a 'urini lx»th COatHtS, thus keeping 
iiivio' 'e th record Ol home games anil 
adding not. er triumph abroad. Only the 
fast A ii y quintet and Main.- I.oast \ i ( 
lories over the Agates. Clark, B.C., 
Northeastern, Williams, aad Trinity have 
fallen icfor • the Aggie onslaught. Two 
trium hs this week would insure the 
recognition ol the 1987 quintet as a 
sin i essful one. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16, 1927 



TH MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, I'uplihht-d every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
William L. Dole 27 Editor-in-Chief 



Let us not fprjrt 1'rexy's injunction 
which was made in eli;i|xl last Monday 
morning. "Whatever else you hug. don't 
fail to hllg the lads." 



PERSONALS 



Ellsworth Baknakd '2H 



Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William L. Doi.h '27 

Harold E. Clakk "2s 

W. GOBBON Hunter '29 

Howard W. Hunter '30 

Ernest L. Spencer V 

John B. Howard JR. tD 

Eric Singleton '30 

Faculty ft Short Courts Edward H. Nichols '29 

Intercollegiate Editor Josephine Panz.ca 2S 

Personals Editor Frances C. Bruce 



Editorial 
Athletics 



Csmpus News 



17 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

_ _ n , .,._ >97 Buiine88 Manager 

?™Th F Wh.taker '27 Advertising Manager 

JoT* E "wniiE '27 Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Loring "28 

Edwin A. Wilder 28 

Harold K. Ansei.l 29 

Lawrence A. Carruth 29 

William A. Egan 29 

Frederick D. Thayer. J R- 



'29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Sn». r #d as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Fort Office A. Spied I" mailing «■>£«*'&! 
SfciSS provided for to -SET 1 03 Act of Oc 
tober. 1917. authorlied August /U. >»»>• 



SINGING FRATERNITIES 

In general, it is conceded that the si„ K 
last Saturday was an improvement over 
the one last year. In general, too, it is 
agreed that college singing has improved 
since last year. The most significant part 
of the singing program last Saturday was 
the college singing at the dose of the 
program. No better example of the in- 
fluence of this contest could be found 
than the highly satisfactory efforts of the 
entire student body while the judges vere 
making their decision. 

But there is one lesson to be learned 
from the sing. The winning fraternity 
has been practicing ever since the last 
mntest. Their motive obviously was not 
rely to carry off the honors in this 
r's contest, that is too petty for so 
duous an effort. It must have been 
rather in the inUrc>t of good college 
singing. The contest has shown that the 
fraternity house is an ideal seat for 
better singing. If it is to have the maxi- 
mum of influence, it must foster the maxi- 
mum of practice. It is no chore to gather 
around the piano before every meeting 
and sing anything and everything with 
especial emphasis on college songs. All 
that any house needs is a start, let 
someone in every fraternity cstal.li-li I 
precedent immediately and the practice 
will soon Ik- carrying itself along by its 
own momentum. Thus, singing fraterni- 
ties will become a singing college. If 
rivalry is keen enough to prompt nine 
fraternities to enter the contest, it should 
prompt them to establish reputation* a- 
singing fraternities. 



LAST HOCKEY GAMES 

< ontinued from page 1) 

tirst and last game from Hates and 
Vermont respectively, while four clash* -s 
resulted in defeats, Hamilton, Amherst, 
Colby, and Middlcbury lieing the victors. 
A scoreless tie was also played in a 
return game with Hates at I.ewiston. 

Coach "Red" hall was fortunate in 
having three letter-men on hand at the 
opening practice sessions this year, hut 
unexpected injuries kept Captain "Joe" 
Forest and "Abe" Abrahamson from 
delivering their best at all times, the 
former being prevented from playing in 
■•vera] games. "Ken" Rich also suffered 
a painful injury during a scrimmage. 

Among the regulars on this year's team, 
Galanie, goalie; Harwell, right defense; 
and Swan, wing, are Seniors. They have 
all proved valuable men to the team, and 
their places will be hard to fill. Captain 
Forest, Abrahamson, Frese, Cook, and 
Nash, the other regulars, will tie available 
next year. The main problem will be to 
develop a dependable goalie and to order 
good weather. The results of the games 
played are as follows: 

M.A.C. 2, Bates 1 

Hamilton 2, M.A.C. 1 

Amherst 1, M.A.C. 

Colby 2, M.A.C. 

M.A.C. 0, Bates 

Middlebury3, M.A.C. 

M.A.C. 2, Vermont 1 



WITH THE ALUMNI 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

The personal column has given rise to 
much criticism from time to time. How- 
ever, very little of the constructive kind 
has come to our attention. We wish to 
make this column one which will truly be 
an asset to the Cdttgfan , therefore any 
constructive suggestions should be mailed 
to the echtor or brought to her attention 
verbally, rather than circulated in obscure 
corners of the campus. 

* » * 

All the initiation banquets were sue 
cesses as far as we have heard. Now the 
freshmen can enter their respective fra- 
ternity houses with much more of a 
sense of safetv. 



The debating team opens its season 
tomorrow night. We should support it 
better than we have in the past. Some 
of us should go to see what it is like and 
others of us to accpiire more of tne atmos- 
phere in order to temper fiaternity house 
discussions. 



Lei us reiterate that we want to go on 

record as averse to the abolition of the 
foreign language requirement from our 

curriculum. 

* * * 

Four more weeks before final examina- 
tions. 



MANY AGGIE ALUMNI 

(Continued from Page 1) 

were (.eorge Cutler '84, Evan F. Richard- 
son '87, Fred S. Cooley '88, Albert F. 
Burgess '95, Erford VV. Poole '96, Charles 
A. Nutting '9o, George A. Drew '97, 
( '.eorge L. Barrus '03, Cerald D. Jones 
'03, Clinton King '07, Parts) VV. Farrer 
'08, Thomas W. Bean '09, Edward J. 
Burke '10, Otto V. T. Urban *10, Edgar 
If. Brown '11, Albert VV. Dodge '12, 
Herbert VV. Headle '13, Philip F. Whit- 
more '15, Ernest L. Russell 'Hi, Frederick 
C. Larson '17, Milford R. Lawrence '17, 
Roland VV. Rogers '17, Lester VV. Sim- 
mons '20, Alfred A. Clough '20, C.eorge 
A. Smith '20, Harry Berman '20, C.eorge 
N. Peck '19, Herbert R. Bond '19, 
Peter J. Cascio '21, Richard H. Sanford 
'21, Paul VV. hrown '21, C.eorge R. 
I (Kkwood '21, Kenneth A. harnard '22, 
Earle S. Leonard '22, Ernest T. Putnam 
'23, Luther B. Arrington '23, Fred G. 
Sean -3, Donald K. Collins '23, Homer 
F. Richards "23, Sherman C. Frost *24, 
Albert E. Waugh '24, Elwyn J. Rowell 
•24, Clifford L helden '24, class of 1925— 
Leo F. Duffy, John S. Lacey, Samuel L. 
Woodbury, Ralph H. Bray, Charles F. 
Ross, I. mil Erickson, Donald Mcservr, 

Charles F. Oliver, John S. Crosby, Leigh- 
ton G, (leaves; class of 192(i — Char!e> 
1".. Turin r, Donald R. Williams, Herbert 
E. Moberg, Preston J. Davenpoit, Earle 
I.. Douglass, William \\ . Ford, Alvin G. 
Stevens. John 1". Lambert, Charles P. 
Reed, Walter L. Hayncs, Lawrence L. 
Jones, Alton H. C.ustafson, Carl A. 

Fraser, Eliot P. Dodge, Emery S. Loud, 

Francis VV . Warren, and Frederic A, 

Baker. 



Gaotfjt Voetsch was floored by a cigar 
at the Sig Ep banquet. 

P 

(hildy Morey and Esther Perkins have 
returned from their respective homes 
WttefJ they have been confined by illness. 
p 

Clayt Morrill is spending this week on 
campus. 

P 

Roly Reed lost his necktie on the early 
car north the other morning. 

P 

Peg Smith '26 is spending a few weeks 
at the Abbey. She is working for the Ag. 
Ec. department. 

P 

Buster Comins has developed a flare for 
photography recently. 

P 

Al LaPrise received a long telegram 
last Sunday which was in keeping with 
the spirit of the Valentine season. 

I — P— 

Harold S. Adams '29 of Whitinsville 

has been chosen assistant manager of 
football. 

Rodge Chamberlain has dusted off the 
motion picture camera. There are several 
interior scenes to be taken yet. It won't 
be long now. 

Betty Steinbugler is willing at all times 
to give demonstrations of palm reading. 
We take the liberty to give her some free 
advertising. Wanted: Hands to Read. 

P 

Lest we be misunderstood, let us ex- 
plain that Julius Carlson was plastered as 
announced last week, but it was real 
plaster which descended from above. 

P 

Layt" Cleaves '25, was seen exultantly 
studying the Dean's Board Saturday 
morning. His name was not there. 
p 

Rushing season is on again. At least 
one fraternity is making concerted efforts 
— at the Abbey. 

P 

Chet McKittrick is known among his 
friends as "My Hero" by virtue of an 
evening date in a new football sweater. 

hi ' 

"There are only two good women over 
the Mountain, and I go out with one 

of them." 

P 

Frank Stratton is associated in some 
campus circles with sophisticated refer- 
ence to Mass. Avenue. 



'16 Henry M. Walker is president of 
the Brackett Coal Co. in Newtonville, 
Mass. 

'14 Harford C. Hart well is touring 
the Keith Albee circuit with a dancing 
act entitled "Sports a la Mode". He is 
also associated with a date ranch in 
Southern California. 

'22 Charles A. Fraser is manager of 
the Chewonski Farm, in Wiscasset, Maine. 

'15 V. D. Callahan is with the Joseph 
Gentile Co. dealing in fruits and vege- 
tables. 

'15 (ierald E. Perry is a rubber broker 
in New York City. 

'22 Charles Austin Farwell is working 
as an engineer of the Standard Oil Co. of 
Venezuela, in South America. 

'25 George W. Hanscomb of Ortega, 
Florida, is the author of an illustrated 
article on "City Planning and the Land- 
scape Architect" in the October number 
of the Florida Engineer and Contractor. 

Herbert M. Emery, formerly a graduate 
student at M.A.C. and at Cornell Univ., 
has been appointed instructor in zoology 
and geology at Rhode Island State Col- 
lege. Mr. Emery has been teaching at 
tne University of New Hampshire since 
1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. FEB. 16. 1927 



MILITARY NOTES 



The Honor roll for the week is as 
follows: 

Day shot a possible prone. 

Zielinski is high man for the second 
consecutive week. 

Captain McKittrick is second high man. 



Captain Lacey, of Norwich, was here 
last Friday to make plans with the 
Military Department for the summer 
camp. This year Norwich is to march to 
Windsor where the men will meet the 
M.A.C. men. From there the group will 
march to Fort Ethan Allen, where they 
will go into camp together. They will 
then march back to Wells, and from here 
the units will return to their respective 
bases. 



The Animal Husbandry Department 
has asked the Military Department to 
give a series of lectures in practical 
work with the lighter breeds of horses. 
There will be instruction in Stable Man- 
agement, Care of Equipment, The Breeds, 
Gaits, and Markets of the lighter types 
of horses. Both theoretical and practical 
work will be taken up. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain was in 
Boston last week end to attend a meeting 
of the State committee of the American 
Chemical Society held in connection with 
the Prize Essay contest conducted by 
the American Chemical Society for 
secondary and high school students. This 
is the fourth contest of its kind and there 
are six prizes of twenty dollars in gold 
awarded in each state to the first six 
essays on subjects pertaining to Chemis- 
try. From the winners of the state con- 
tests are picked the six best essays for 
which the awards are four year fellowships 
to Yale University, Yassar or other in- 
stitutions. These fellowships include five 
hundred dollars annually besides the 
tuition fees. 



On Wednesday Captain Sumner and 
Major Briscoe are going to attend a 
meeting and dinner of the polo players 
of Springfield. During the polo season 
the M.A.C. team will play the Spring- 
field team. 



There have been requests from some 
of the graduates of M.A.C. to be allowed 
to go on active duty during the summer 
camp. This will be of the utmost value 
to those who may be allowed to do so. 



TWO-YEAR PERSONALS 



Judging by the group at the Tuesday 
night swim there will be new records to 
the Catalina Islands. 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

During the last week, Dr. A. E. Cance. 
Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Head of the Department, was called to 
VV isconsin by the death of his mother. 



This week's hero: J. Wesley Maclntyre 



THETA CHI BROADCASTS 

Theta Chi represented Aggie on the 
air last Saturday night through station 
VVBZ at Springfield. The program con- 
sisted of several selections by a quartet, 
a violin solo by P. Raymond Plumer '29, 
and a cornet solo by Everett J. Pyle '27. 
The quartet included Frederic J. Flem- 
ings '28, Robert A. Lincoln '28, P. 
Raymond Plumer '29, and Kermit K. 
Kingsbury '30. with Arnold VV. Dyer II 
at the piano. Ralph T. Dawc -<l acted 
as announcer, his deep voice carrying far 
out into apace. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB CONCERT 

GIVEN AT SOUTH DEERFIELD 



For some time Captain Hughes has 
been trying to buy King Tut from the 
Government but for some reason the 
officials do not seem to want to do this. 
However the Captain is in hopes that he 
may eventually succeed and therefore he 
is using his most persuasive language to 
convert the minds of those who are 
opposed to the idea. There have been 
several long letters exchanged between 
the Captain and the office at Boston, and 
the whole Department is expectantly 
waiting the outcome of the argument. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up oae fight) 

OculUta Prescriptions Pilled. Brokao l«M 
accurately replaced 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 



Pythagorean theory! 



"There is nothing so encouraging a> an 



who battles "Aggie English" with the I appreciative audience," say the members 



We are searching diligently for the one 
"shorthorn" who wasn't at the Greenfield 
carnival. 



We all had souvenirs of the trip but 
Ripley's millinery took the cake. 



Among those present at the recent 
meeting of the Agricultural Outlook Com- 
mittee of the New England Research 
Council, were J. H. Hills, Dean and 
Director of Vermont Agricultural Col- 
lege; Prof. I. ('.. Davis, Head of the 
Department of Agricultural Economics 
and Connecticut Storrs Experiment Sta- 
tion, and formerly a post graduate stu- 
dent at M.A.C; and F r e de r ick V. Waugh 
'22, now director of Bureau of Markets 
of State Department of Agriculture. In 
addition there were Director Willurd A. 
Mtinson of the Extension Se rvi ce Staff, 
and Director Sidney B. Haskell of the 
Experiment Station. 



The Department of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics of the Experiment Station has 
now in print a bulletin reporting a study 
of the Export Market for New England 
applet. This was written by Assistant 
Professor Lorian P. Jefferson of the 
Department of Agricultural Economics. 
It is but one of a series of studies now 



TWO-YEAR NOTES 

Last Friday evening the A.T.G club 
held a Valentine dance in the Memorial 
Building. The hall was decorated in a 
color scheme of red and white. During 
intermission appropriate favors were pre- 
sented to those present and the refresh- 
ments consisted of fancy ices and cakes. 
The "Little Sercnaders" furnished the 
music for the dance. Prof, and Mrs. Paul 
V iets, Prof, and Mrs. Guy (ilatfelter, 
Prof, and Mrs. Harold Smart and Mr. 
and Mrs. Cleary were the local chaper- 
ones and Mrs. Fritzler of Northampton 
was the chaperone from Smith College. 

The eighth annual banquet of the 
A.T.G club will be held in the Lord 
Jeffery Inn next Friday evening, Feb. 2(*>. 

being made in Massachusetts of the state 
orchard industry. It will probably come 
from the press in a week or ten days. 



of the C.irls' I '.lee Club, after a successful 
concert at South Deerfield, last Friday 
evening. The atmosphere which pervaded 
the new Parish Hall, in which the con- 
cert was presented, served as an inspira- 
tion for the girls to do the best thay have 
done yet this season. Both the audience 
and the performers entered cordially into 
the spirit of the program. Inability on 
the part of the listeners to repress their 
enthusiasm resulted in a burst of ap 
plause during an interval of "rests" in 
"Autumn Storms". 

Two new and attractive features of 
the program were the solos rendered by- 
Josephine Panzica '28 and readings given 
by Margaret Donovan '30. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While I Wait 

Ni-.v 1'KICES 

.ten's Whole Soles. Rubber Heel.- - - *L55 

vlen's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - - IT* 

Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels - - 2.» 

Men's Half Soles L3» 

Wort Gua inteed — Corner of Pleasant and 
Amity St*. Open till 8 P.M. 



The annual Fertilizer and Feed Control 
bulletins from the Experiment Station 
are now available for distribution. 



PROFESSOR PATTERSON IS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The reading was given in seven scenes, 
carrying the story through the time when 
Rip returns to his native village after a 
twenty years absence, and is finally 
recognized by his daughter. Professor 
Patterson assumed his various and varied 
roles to perfection, vividly depicting the 
characters both by word and action. The 
accent of Rip Van Winkle was particu- 
larly notable, and the habitual unsteadi- 
ness of the legendary personage was 
presented in a style that was rather en- 
lightening in days such as these. 

A large audience followed the reader 
very closely and responded sympatheti- 
cally to his impersonations. 




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Greenfield, Maaa. 



WALSHIZATION PAYS! 



Our Spring Merchandise, which is arriving daily is ample proof that the HOUSE OF WALSH is a harbinger of the Kver Changing whims of t| u . College man. 

"DON'T WISH, WALSU1ZE." 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 



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Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



They're Correct- 
That is why men buy Bostonians. 
They are leaders in style and quality. 
Try one pair and you will always 
wear them. 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



A BOOK OF LAMPLIGHT 

By Knullen Voyde 
(Princeton University Preee) 

"Hearty all tha stuff in thi* book baa 
been aaad a> fuel for tne Diogenea Lamp 

Column of tha lhiily Prim, toman li.is 

cau se d it to bora vita i brighter, arnoluer 

llame." It is all written l.y Stephen P. 
Harris, formerly of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Collage in the class of IB26. 

Mr. Harris was very fond of this College 
but came to feel that an education that 
atrraacd the humanities aright meet his 
needs In-tter and therefore went to Prince 
ton at the end of his freshman year. At 

Princeton ha became prominent, especially 

as a writer. 1 Je was for t wo or t hree years 
an editor of the Daily Primctoman in 
which he created an unusual humorous 
column. The present hook contains 7.'< 
pagaa of verse and proas of a highly in- 
dividual type. The selections form a 
commentary on various experiences of 
•vary C0Heg« man. Though apparently 
very light, the selections do not lack 
pith. The humor is really funny and never 
suggests effort. 

What memories of college "hash-houses'* 
or "dives" are caught in these verses like 
the fly in amlx-r. 

"I think that I have never seen 

A poem as lovely as a bean. 
"A bean whose thirsting stalk is piot 

Against the earth's sweet flowing breast ; 
"A ham that looks to Zeus all day, 

And lifts her leafy arms to pray. 

"A lx-an that may in summer wear 
A caterpillar in her hair. 

"Upon whose leafage bugs have lain 

That gave the farmer one great pain. 
"Whose fruit will feed a hungry troup — ■ 

laeerpovatad into soap. 

"Poems are made by fools, I ween, 

Bat only Zsascaa make- a bean." 

In the prose prote st entitled Poor Self 

| memories of certain spasms by one of the 

instructors in our own Department of 

EngUah at MAC are "revani|>cd". Here 



is an extract from the tragic atorj . "We 

have recently seen, with our own eyes, 

reports ol Sella having bsea brained by ■ 
librarian, fined l>> ■ indue, operated on 

lor nail stones, scalped by •■ Indian. . . 
Won't ■O mebo dy please do something lor 
|m>oi Self? Of miiM this sort of thing— 
this disgrace to American humanity go 
on forever?" 

Suggestions of Holmes and \\ . S. 
Gilbert hnag about "Ballad of (hem. 
I ..ib ", "Ballad of long War", ami "Dry- 
ing Humor", but these are by no means 
unworthy p o s te r ity . "Napoleon GrifMa 
Paris with ( .rape-Shot " is conceived and 
carried out as a real unit. 

Some definitions are rather touching: 
"Philosophy is a skinny little bigamist 

with two wives, Science and Religion. 

He is always trying to embrace l>oth at 
Once and gits himself into no end of 
dilhculty." "A college education, in the 
last analysis, proves to Ik- the flower of 
youth in a four year loaf made with 
lather's dough." "Why do so many 
sophomores flunk philosophy? Because 
you can't put abstract ideas into concrete 
heads." 

Perhaps this line will serve as a 
"requiem" for the collection: "Let's go 
into the graveyaid and eat some epi- 
laphy." C. H. Patterson. 



Town Hall, Amherst 



FOOTBALL 

Rumors of the coming football season 
are in the air with twenty or thirty 
candidates raportiajg weekly for indoor 
I it act ice on Saturday mornings. Veteran 
Senior and Junior players are assisting 
in coa< hing new aspirants for varsity 
|H)sitions. 



BOXED BULBS 

ALL STARTED 

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All work tuarantttd. Shoes skintd and dyed. 60< 

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Friday 

.too 
Mli a.3a 



Sat urda y 

too 

h>.«S M..MI 



I In- triumphant trl urn of 
till It it l< IKiKslMI N 
OF till' All M \| \ I'M 

Hi \ lm i.,iii | , i,, i, , |,i, 

li i ■ 'I mi (In- Rla>< ii Ibanec 
novel a Ufa Rudolph \ itlenUno 
.mil \'i i 1 1 u\ i tverwhelm- 
inn ovatioai gieet il»- ret urn Ot 
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I M . Bet lie* unusual lilm 
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Rangei in "H.AMING 

FURY. \\ lirll a illllt loves 

In' iIih'S not i mini tin- i nst lint 
fights .i ml giw s to tin' last gaap. 
so it is with k.uiKi'i tin- wonder 
■Iok alone, robbed ol thenate 
in' laved In' foiiKlit tot iiis 

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News ami Coated! 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALK6 

RECORDS 

Hnak the old Records!) 

Why not? 

You can gal Ix-ttcr ones at 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

RKAR AMIIKRST HANK 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First house south of campus. 
Telephone 511 



NEW STYLES IN MALLORY HATS 

The Newest Spring shapes and colors are here and ready for you. Cravanettid finish that will stand plenty of hard wear Priced $6 and $7 

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James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



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The latest craze: 40 information tests 

Ray Stannard Baker rated 94* 

Three average citizens made scores of 

52, 68 and 78. What do you rate? 



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What is I ri-ntanr.' 
I Who iliscoven-il the X-Ray.' 
What is the ^hiiiti'-t verse io the Bible? 

Who said "What this rotinlry n<><!- 

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What is John D. Ko< kefclkr s middle 

nami- ' 
Who said "I would rather be riRht 

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New Spring Goods arriving daily — ties, shoes, socks and shirts— all at reasonable prices 

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SPRING STYLES!! 

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EXETER 



CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



HYANNIS 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16, 1927 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA WINS 

Continued from l\ii>«- 1) 

man ion with 212 |M)ints, running Q.T.V. 
a close monad. P. Raymond Plwnw W 
directed the singing of this group which 
mWrtnrl as its nffnrlnp tin- "Evening 
Hymn" mm! "old Theta CM". Than 

were very well rendered and displayed 
the work put in on than by the members. 
The spirit of friendly rivalry was 
much in evidence as the various frater- 
nities put forth their Ix-st efforts. As a 
result, many of the songs, besides being 
very attractive of themselves, were sung 
in a manner that must have given the 
judges no little trouble in arriving at 
their decision. 

Neil C. Robinson '27 led the audience 
in several songs while the judges were 
deliberating. 

The program included the following: 
SIGMA PHI EPSILON— Alexander Hodnon 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen" 
"Sig Ep Girl" 
THETA (HI— Raymond Plumer 
"Evening Hymn" 
"Old Theta Chi" 
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA— Donald Campbell 
"Song of Lambda Chi" 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen 
Q. T. V.— Elliot Marsh 

"When Twilight Shadows Deepen " 
"Alma Mater" 
ALPHA GAMMA RHO— Frank Stratum 
"The Girl of the Green and Gold" 
"Evening Hymn" 
KAPPA SIGMA— Taylor Mills 
"Jolly Students" 
"A Kappa Sigma Song" 
PHI SIGMA KAPPA— Howard Thomas 
"Boost Old Aggie" 
"Phi Sigma Kappa Song" 
ALPHA SIGMA PHI— Richard Grover 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen" 
"Evening Shadows" 
KAPPA EPSILON— Earl Williams 
"When Twilight Shadows Deepen 
"Boost Old Aggie" 



YE AGGIE INN 



Bean Contest 



YE AGGIE INN 



OPEN TO ALL— One chance with every 25 cent purchase in the store— (Not including candy or tobacco.) 
A chance to win a $5.00 Fountain Pen, $3.50 Pipe or $2.50 of valuable merchandise. 

CONTEST Closes March 1, 1927 



( .i itiin also came through with both a 
lloor basket and two more free tries in 
the second half. 

In keeping with the aim of teamwork, 
no player featured exclusively for M.A.C. 
Perhaps Reed, who was high scorer, 
should l>e mentioned for his spectacular 
shots. The second half saw the entire 
unit working to perfection after a dis- 
couraging opening period in which both 
teams used a close five-man defense, the 
five most familiar with the court manag- 
ing to do most of the scoring. Among the 
Trinity hoopsters, Burr at left forward 
Hashed a pretty floor game, and Hall- 
strom was the perfecting link in the 
Blue and Gold defense. The summary: 
MAC. TRINITY 



B. F. P. 

Griffin. If 1 3 5 Halstrom. rb 

Reed, rf 4 2 10 Burton, rb 

Thomas, c 2 2 6 Whitaker, lb 

Part heiraer. lb 3 6 Ebersold. c 

Nash, rb Mastron'k, rf 

MEwen. rb Burr. If 



1 2 


4 19 
1 3 
1 3 



culture, and from several farmer's or- 
ganizations. These men assembled to 
prepare an outlook for the conditions in 
New England agriculture in the coming 
year. There were representatives from 
the Crop Reporting service and also from 
the United States Department of Agri- 
culture. 

As a result of the meeting the following 
general conclusions were reached. The 
outlook for southern New England farm- 
ers is generally favorable for 1927. The 
report on the probable poultry conditions 
was prepared by a committee of which 
Professor Branch and Professor Yount 
were members. The dairy and poultry 
industries were found to be on a favor- 
able position as they entered the new 
year and the present indications are that 
this situation will continue to be favor- 
able. In regard to the crops, particular 
caution was urged against over-planting 



in 1927 of tobacco, onions, and potatoes. 
Apple plantings were advised only under 
the best conditions and the most desir- 
able varieties. 

In a general way the outlook for 1927 
is good for those farmers who are produc- 
ing products of high quality. For this 
type of farmer the prospects are good 
and their output will be in demand by 
markets which are yet unsatisfied by this 
type of product. 



Totals 10 7 37 Totals 7 3 17 

Score at half time— Trinity 12. Mass. Aggie 2. 
Referee — Jackson. Time — 20-minute periods. 



The Harvard Crimson has published its 
second annual "Critical Catalogue". This 
contains articles which are written to help 
students, both old and new in the selection 
of their courses. Information concerning 
the details of the various studies appear- 
ing in the university catalogue which are 
not printed in the regular announcement 
of courses published by the University 
comprise the contents. 




WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
375 High St., Holyoke 



SECOND HALF DRIVE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

diminutive forward each contributed two 
more double-deckers before the game 
ended, as did "Blondie" Thomas. "Ray" 



Prof. Branch at Meeting 
of N.E. Research Council 

Delegates Discuss Outlook for New 
England Agriculture. 



Prof. Fayette H. Branch went to Boston 
last week to attend a meeting of the New 
England Research Council on Marketing 
and Food Supply. At this meeting were 
delegates from the various New England 
colleges, the state departments of agri- 



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Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23, 1927 



Number 18 



Debating Team Loses 

First Contest of Year 

Experienced G. W. U. Team Has Better of Argument 

on War Debts 



The M.A.C. debating team lost its first 
contest of the year to (ieorge Washington 
1 niversity last Thursday evening before 
a good-sized audience. The lack of ex- 
IH-rience of two members of the home 
team, together with the fact that it was 
the first debate of the season, and also 
that they had perhaps the more difficult 
position to uphold, accounted for the 3-0 
decision rendered by the judges. 
(Continued on Pag* » 



Literary Club Meeting 
Have Larger Attendance 

Comparison of Modern and Greek 
Ideas is Discussed. 



Our new Literary Club held its weekly 
meeting last Tuesday evening in the usual 
place, the topic for discussion being a 
comparison of some modern ideas with 
those of ancient Greece. Eric Singleton 
'30 presented the subject and pointed out 
how similar the attitude of the people of 
today is to the attitude of the people of 
I'lato's time toward any plan for im- 
proving the quality of the human race. 
An interesting discussion followed which 
brought out the fact that the majority 
of those present were optimists. 

The number of students attending these 
meetings is steadily increasing. All are 
welcome and are urged to come to the 
next meeting, to be held Tuesday, March 
first. 



Michigan Professor Is 

Exchange Lecturer 

Prof. Gardner Will Lecture Each 
Afternoon of This Week. 



During the week of February 21-25 
Professor Victor R. Gardner of Michigan 
Stale College will be at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College as "exchange lec- 
turer" in horticulture. Two weeks later, 
March 7-11, Professor Fred C. Sears will 
go to Michigan State College to complete 
the exchange. Professor Gardner will 
lecture each day at 3.45 at Wilder Hall. 
His lectures will be upon topics of orchard 
management and the teaching of horti- 
culture. They are arranged primarily for 
the benefit of teachers and research men 
in the Division of Horticulture, but the 
public will be welcome to any of these 
lectures. 



NEW INDEX BOARD 
TO BE CHOSEN 



Competition for Editorial Staff of 
1929 Number Nears Close. 



With the competition for the 1929 
Index gradually drawing to a close, the 
prospect for an efficient board next year 
is very evident. Competitors are asked 
to report at the Index Office, tomorrow 
evening at 7.30, at which time final in- 
struction will be given so that the compe- 
tition may be brought to a close as soon 
as possible. 

This competition, which started early 
"i November, is for the Literary, Statis- 
tics, Art, and Photographic departments. 
The heads of the various departments of 
the 1928 Index Poard have been assist- 
ing Harold E. Clark '28, Editor-in-Chief, 
"i the instruction and present indications 
°' the new board seem to be very favor- 
able although all the work assigned has 
not been turned in as yet. At present, 
■nterest is lacking in the Art department 
an d it is hoped that any Sophomore who 
nas any ability whatsoever in this field, 
W 'H report at the meeting of the present 
Board tomorrow evening. 

• he competition for the various divi - 

Sk, ns of the Business department is not 

>et under way but will undoubtedly open 

,n( ' first part of the spring term. Aspi- 

nu»U for the positions in this department 

*»11 do well to get in touch with Albion 

Kicker '28 for more definite informa- 
tion. 



KAPPA EPSILON TOPS 

SCHOLARSHIP LIST 



Takes Lead from Delta Phi Alpha. 
Seniors Are Highest Class. 

Tne scholastic standings for the fall 
term of the fraternities and the four 
classes haVe recently been issued. The 
fraternities have been rearranged some 
what as to standing, with Kappa Epsilon 
heading the list. The following are the 
fraternity and non-fraternity for the first 
term, 1926-1927: 

Kappa Epsilon 79.77 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 78.70 

Delta Phi Alpha If.SJ 

Alpha Gamma Rho 77 24 

Non-Prat, or Sor 77 06 

Kappa Gamma Phi 76 96 

Delta Phi Gamma 76 72 

Kappa Sigma 76 . 67 

Lambda Chi Alpha 76 66 

Theta Chi 75 90 

Q.T.V 7. r » IN 

Phi Sigma Kappa 74 71 

Alpha Sigma Phi ft.tl 

It is impossible to make a comparison 

with the fraternity averages of any other 

one term, but when compared with the 

standing of last year, several interesting 

facts are to be noticed. Kappa Fpsilon 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Social Union Concert 

by Musical Clubs 

Men's and Girls' Glee Clubs Will 
Entertain Friday Night. 



m< 



Co-ed Prom Big 

Weekend Event 



Formal Dance Held Friday Evening. 
Tea Dance on Saturday. 



The Co-ed Prom, which was held this 
last week end under the auspices of the 
Delta Phi ( ■am ma Sorority, has come and 
gone, yet few of those who attended the 
festivities will soon forget it. The big 
event of the week end took place Friday 
evening in Memorial Hall in the form of 
a Valentine Formal Dance which lasted 
from five-thirty until one o'clock in the 
morning. The Hall was artistically deco- 
rated with large black silhouttes and big 
red hearts and presented an ideal atmos- 
phere for the Valentine spirit which pre- 
vailed. President and Mrs. E. M. Lewis 
and Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Huthsteiner were 
the patrons and patronesses for the dance. 
The music was furnished by the Lord Jeff 
Serenaders and supper was served in 
Draper Hall at eight o'clock. 

The Tea Dance, which took place on 
Saturday at the Amherst Women's Club, 
proved to be one of the most enjoyable 
events which the co-eds have planned. 
Cards furnished diversion for those who 
did not wish to dance all the numbers. 
Eddie Haertl's orchestra furnished the 
music for the dance, which was chaperoned 
by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Huthsteiner and 
Prof, and Mrs. W. W. Chenoweth. 

Men were present from Amherst Col- 
lege, Springfield, Holyoke as well as from 
M.A.C. and many of last year's alumni 
returned to take part in the festivities. 
The committee responsible for the success 
of the activities was headed up by Dorothy 
Chapman '28. The other members were 
Frances Bruce and May Wiggin '27, and 
Ruth Faulk and Mary Harrington '29. 



Next Friday evening the annual Cam- 
pus Concert, under the auspices of the 
Social Union, will be given by the com- 
bined Musical Clubs and the Girls' (.lee 
Club in Stockbridge Hall. This concert 
always serves as the climax of the season 
for each group and efforts are being made 
to make it the In-st ever. 

Each club will present the features from 
its regular concert program in addition 
to several joint numbers. The clubs will 
be assisted by Mrs. Alexander E. Cance 
of Amherst, who is a concert violinist of 
note, and Mr. Postley Sinclair of North- 
ampton, who will render several tenor 
solos. 

Following the concert the members of 
the clubs will hold a private dance in 
the Memorial Building. Admission will 
lie limited to club members and their 
invited guests. The cha|>erone8 will be 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Beaumont and 
Mr. and Mrs. William I. Goodwin. 



Phi Kappa Phi 

Has Assembly 

Two Faculty Members and Five 

Seniors Receive Keys. Fred 

S. Cooley '88 is Speaker. 



Overtime Period G y- ss 

Aggie Sense Si 3nal Win 

Worcester Tech Held Scoreless While Aftates Roll Up Seven 

Points in Last Five Minutes 



AGGIE FIVE LOSES 

WESLEYAN CONTEST 

Locals' Man-toMan Play Baffles 
Visitors in Second Half. 



I 927 Index Accounts 
Show Favorable Balance 



Members of Board Will Purchase 
Books of Poetry. 



Assembly exercise on Wednesday, Feb. 
Hi, was gfaesj over to the Phi Kappa Phi 
fraternity for the purpose of presenting 
the badges to the newly elected mcmlHTS. 
Professor Frank A. Waugh, president of 
the chapter, presided while the candidal M 
were introduced and their records read by 
the marshal, Professor ('has. A. Peters. 
Two mcmlx-rs of the faculty, Arthur I'. 
French and Norman J. Pylc received their 
keys at this time along with five inem- 
bers of the senior class: Mary Ingraham 
of Millis, with an average of B&A, Ralph 
W. Ilaskins of Greenfield, 8X.5, Clarence 
H. Parsons of Amherst, XK..'{, Herman E. 
Pickens of Stoniham, K8.2, and James B. 
Waltham with X8. 

'Continued on I'aHe 2) 



Sophomore Members of 
Hop Committee Elected 

Members from Senior Class Will Be 
Chosen Later. 



The Mass. Aggie basketball team was 
overcome by a well-drilled Wesleyan 
quintet by a score of 20 to lfi in a closely 
contested battle on the Middlctown 
court last Friday night. The Agates 
were leading at half time by one point, 
the score reading 5 to 4. The Wesleyan 
five resorted to a man-to-man type of 
defense in the second |>eri<xl, at which 
they were successful enough to amass the 
necessary points for a victory. 

The first half of the contest was similar 
to several staged at the Drill Hall this 
year. The Goremcn held the ball nearly 
all the time, and forced the Middlet owners 
to play a waiting game. For nearly eleven 
minutes neither team scored, when (apt. 
"Part" Partenheimer suddenly tallied on 
a short shot. Not lone afterward "Roly" 
Reed dribbled in and added another 
(Continued on Pago 2) 



STUDENT CONFERENCE 
AT WILLI AMST0WN 

Twenty Colleges to be Represented at 
Annual Meeting of Volunteer Council. 



The Sophomore class held a meeting 
last Wednesday for the purpose of 
electing a fifth member to the Soph-Senior 
Hop Committee. The committee is now 
made up of the following Sophomores: 
Chas. S. (leaves of Gardner, Arnold W. 
Dyer of Falmouth, John R. Kay of 
Post on. Kenneth W. Perry of Holliston, 
and John R. Zielinski, Jr. of Holyoke. 
Senior members of this committee are to 
be elected at a later date from among the 
ones who served in the group during their 
sophomore year. 

The boys of the freshman class also 
held a conclave on Wednesday to set a 
date for their smoker. It was decided to 
hold this on March 4 in the Social Union 
Hall. 



There will lx- held this year, at William s 
town, March I to ti, the L'.'.th Annual 
Students' Volunteer Council Conferem e. 
At this conference at least twenty eastern 
colleges will lx- represented, and it is 
ex|K( ted that there will be three hundred 
present. There will lx- al)out a dozen 
representatives of M.A.C. The three 
uptx-r classes will recall that the Con- 
ference of last year was held at Aggie 
during the time of the epidemic of influ- 
enza. 

Among the s|x-akcrs at the Conference 
this year will lx- President Girtield of 
Williams College; Dr. Rolxrt Wilder, 
Dr. Rolxrt E. S|xar, and Miss Margaret 
Crutchfield, who s|x>ke in Bowker Audi 
torium January 24. The theme of this 
year's meeting will be "Thy Kingdom 
(<ime, thy will lx- done". Students should 
remember that the Conference is not only 
for those who are connected with ( hrisitan 
Associations but is for everyone interested 
in World Christianity. During such an 
unsettled time as the present such a dis- 
cussion as this is sure to lx- very instruct- 
ing and full of |x»ints of interest. The 
M.A.C.C.A. urges all those who can 
possibly go to do so. 



Won ester Tech's six-cdv basketball 
quintet gave the Agates no little cause 
for anxiety in a well played contest at 
the Drill Hall last Wednesday, but the 
M.A.C. team put seven counters on the 
ledge in a live minute overtime period 
and won the game, M to 17. The visitors 
displayed one of the In-st defenses seen 
here this season, while their offense was 
also very creditable. The score at half 
time was 9 to S, the Aggies in the lead, 
and the count at the end of the regulation 
periods was 17 all. Tech was held score- 
less in the overtime session. 

"Ray" Griffin opened the scoring 
with a free try, but Cross, Rauha, and 
Harris all tallied for W.P.I, before the 
Aggie five came to life. Spurred on by 
vix iferous cheers, the home team speeded 
up, and "Ray" Griffin gratified the crowd 
with three successive long shots from the 
right side of the court after "Blondie" 
Thomas had scored once on a follow-in. 

Captain Partenheimer tallied first from 

under the h<x>p in the second |M-riod, and 

"Ray" connected once again. Tech came 

back with two more double deckers, and 
(Continued on Pago 2) 



Clark School Quintet 

Defeated by 2-Yrs. 

Holland High Scorer in Easy 
16—6 Victory. 



The Two Near quintet defeated Clark 
Sehcx>l ol Hanover, N. II., lti-ti on the 
Drill Hall ll<M>r last Thursday evening. 
The Shorthorns took the lead at the start 
and kept it throughout the game. Holland 
was high scorer for the home team, while 
Putters shone on the defense. Rodgers 
featured for ('lark School. 

The summary: 



Two- 


Year 






Clark 








It 


F. 


P. 




it 


1 


1' 


i'l.. ti. If 


2 


I 


4 


RSSSSSB, rb 


I 


il 


II 


I'.n ..,ii . rf 


2 


u 


■2 


Mnis. , ili 





n 


II 


Holland. | 


4 


1 





1 ..ii km. Ih 


II 


<l 





( li.n «-. Ih 





I 


1 


\l Ijiilliilltll . 


1) 





'1 


Hut ten. rli 





it 


(i 


Koilnrri, c 


2 





4 










I'.iiiiiKiun, rf 





II 


i) 










Woods, If 


1 


'1 


■1 



Girls' Glee Club 

Gives Three Concerts 



Entertain at Leverett, Leeds, and 
in Amherst. 



Schedules for the spring term are now 
being issued from the Schedule Office and 
election cards and hours plans must be 
filed before March 1. 



The accounts and records of the 1927 
Index have recently been verified by Prof. 
Lawrence S. Dickinson, Faculty Business 
Advisor, and Kenneth W. Milligan '27, 
Bussiness Manager, and show a balance 
of about $40 to the credits of the Board. 

At a recent meeting of the Board, which 
was called to decide on the disposal of 
the surplus, it was voted to purchase 
copies o( Robert Frost's latest collection 
of poems entitled, "Selected Poems", for 
each member of the Board. This will 
take the place of the customary annual 
banquet. The books have been ordered 
and will be available as soon as they are 
autographed by the author. 



The boy's Ynkhorne group will meet 
tonight at the home of Mr. Walter Dyer, 
Publication Advisor. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"(ibrry is Priceless." 

— Lytlon (iMdy of Lyons). 



Friday— 

7 p. m. Social Union. M.A.C. Glee Club. 
Two-War basketball. Sacred Heart High of 
Holyoke at M.A.C. 
.Saturday — 

Varsity basketball, N. H. at Durham. 
Sunday— 
9.10 Sunday Chapel, Rev. Harry P. Nichols, 
New Vork City. 
Wednesday — 

Varsity basketball, Middlebury at 
Middlebury. 



With concerts scheduled at Leverett, 
Leeds, and the Odd Fellows' Hall last, 
the Girls' Glee Club put in a very strenu- 
ous week. 

The Leverett concert was presented 
Monday evening of last week under the 
auspices of the Grange organization of 
Leverett. Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin ac- 
companied the girls on the trip. The 
concert at Leeds was presented to the 
veterans of the hospital under the auspices 
of the American Legion on Wednesday 
evening. Miss Kdna L. Skinner chaper- 
oned the girls to the Veteran's Hospital. 
The last concert of the week was given 
at the Old Fellows' Hall in town and was 
followed by a dance. The musir for the 
dance was furnished by the inimitable duet 
which has appeared once before with the 
(.Ice Club: Lota Bliss and Ksther Perkins 
both '29. Mrs. M. B. Marsh attended the 
last concert with the girls. 

This year the season for the '.iris' <>lee 
Club will lx; extended by common con- 
sent of the girls into the spring term. A 
concert has been arranged for April in 
Whately, and arrangements for other 
concerts during that month are now being 
made. 



Totals 7 2 16 TotaN 3 S 

Sun- .ii li.ill time Two- Year 6. (lark 2. 
krlini Ilium. i- lime H minute periods. 



JUNIOR CLASS HAS 

SUCCESSFUL SMOKER 



Captain Sumner is Speaker. 
Etcellent Program Given. 



The social union room in North College 
was the scene of a festive gathering last 
Friday evening, when the Junior class 
held its first smoker of the college year. 
Several factors prevented a large atten- 
dance, the nun'ber present lx_'ing about 
thirty-five. 

An excellent program of entertainment 
was presented, the first number of which 
was a performance by "Don" Savage on 
his one-string cigar lx>x fiddle, accom- 
panied by "Red" Marsh. When the 
appluase had died away, "Dave" Brad- 
ford came upon the stage in the role of 
Dr. Powers, and performed several 
physics experiments, to the great delight 
and edification of his audience. The next 
entertainer was William K. (.rant, whose 
dramatic: reading of "Casey at the Bat" 
[stirred in many a heart longings for 
spring and baseball. He was followed by 
"Jess" llairston, who sang several nun)- 
Ixrs, accompanied by "Don" Tiffany, 
and the "Aggie Quartet", consisting of 
McVey, Tiffany, Hairston, and Quinn. 
Both of these features were greatly 
appreciated ; as one of the fellows remarked 
he would have lx en willing to listen to 
such singing all night. 

The faculty sjx aker for the evening was 
Captahl Sumner, who gave a short in- 
formal talk on the general subject of 
preparedness, and afterward became the 
(inter of an animated discussion on 
various military questions. The final 
feature of the evening was the distri- 
bution of refreshments of apples, punch, 
and apple turnovers, after which the 
Alma Mater was sung and the gathering 
brok: up. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23, 1927 



ft 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, I'uplisrud tviry 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

William L. Dole '27 Kditor-in -Chief 



ELLSWOttlll hAk.NAKIl 2l 



Managing I diti 



DEPARTMENT EDITOR! 

Editorial William L. Doll '27 

Athletic* HAmaUt B. ( i-AkK VI 

W. GOstBOM ROWtM *2'.» 

Howakd W. HUMTH "30 

Campus Newt Kknest L. Si'F.ncek 18 

John B. IlowAkii Jk. "JO 
Kkii BlMOLCTOM "il» 
Faculty k Short COSTSM Kowakd H. Nu hois '2U 
Intercollegiate Editor Josephine Panzica '2h 

Personals Rdltoi Frances C. Bkuce '27 



he niailc at miiiic Assembly; the student ■.. I 
are not inurehted in DMMUTCI I" improve 
tlic ( 'ollene which invariably meet an 
Untimely end in the Stale House; and the 
professors might well save their wisdom 
loi I hen | laMMi 

l..isl year the student body voted on 
the qtMtt JOQ and apparently decided in 

favor of continuing compulsory morning 

chapel. Since that time, however, we 
have heard an increasing amount <>l 

complaint, We recommend that the 
Senate take the necessary steps to 
ascertain the present sentiment in regard 

to compulsory morning chapel. 

E. B. 



WITH THE ALUMNI 




BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charles F. CtAOfl '27 Business MaSSSSf 

Lewis H Whitakek 27 Advertising Manaiiei 
John E. White '27 Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. LoBJMfl ti 

Kdwin A. Wilder '2K 

Harold K. Anski.l '29 

Lawrence A. Carrcth '29 

William A. Kgan '29 
Feedbbu k I). Thayer, Jr. '-".» 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postHie provided (or in section 1 103, Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized Aiiguat 20. 191H. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

This is the time when we think of 
Lincoln and Washington. Let us remem- 
ber some of the ideals and precepts of 
these great Amcriraiis. 

* * * 

Did you say anything at Student 
Forum today or did you reserve your 
opinions until afterwards.'' 

* * * 

There are less than three weeks before 

finals. 



PARLEZ-VOUS FRANCAlSr 

We wonder if the student body realizes 
just how imminent is the peril to foreign 
languages in our curriculum. We feel 
thai if they did they would do more than 
talk in small groups around the campus. 

The members of the faculty are, of course, 

niaturer than we, but, since it is the 
students more than the teachers that 
make the college, the- students should lie 
listened to, and their desires should be 
given consideration. We hope that the 
work of the senior curriculum committee 
will lie considered seriously. It is signiti- 
« .tut that this student committee is in 
favor of a lilieral course in the first two 
years. Significant, too, are the remarks 
concerning changing the name of the 
college', the interest shown in sue h courses 
as Professor Patterson's elective litera- 
ture courses and Professor Waugh's art 
appreciation course, and the favorable 
reaction to Robert Frost's agricultural 
references a few weeks ago. 

Has the fad that the two largest majors 

in the college are landscape Gardening 
and Aggie Ed. no importance? Landscape 
Gardening is no vocation for unlettered 
men and we fail to see how that depart- 
ment can ad«l their pressure to that of 
the reformers. Education speaks for itself. 
Those who are in this major rejoice in 
their wide elective range. There arc I 
few who are majoring in Aggie Ed for 
this reason alone. If this is the upper- 
classmen's attitude, should the freshmen 
and sophomores of the future be permitted 
to sidestep modern language? 

Remember that it is much easier to 
prevent legislation than to repeal it. 
There must be some way to show under- 
graduate opinion to the faculty in such a 
way that they will have to take notice, 
before they make their fmai decision and 
publish it. At present — we may be too 
pessimistic — the regime seems to be 
taxation without representation. There- 
fore, we cry from outside the doors of 
the M.A.C. Reichstag and trust in Cod 
that we shall lie heard. 



PHI KAPPA PHI HAS ASSEMBLY 

(Continued from Patje 1) 

Professor Watigh introduced Professor 
bred S. Cooky 'KH, ■ double member of 
Phi Kappa Phi, as the speaker of the 

afternon. Professor Cooky told about his 

life and work since- graduating from 
Aggie and told many amusing incidents 
in connection with the professors of his 
day. He spoke in glowing terms of the 
"Mig hour" of the college, namely William 
Smith (lark, Levi Stockbridge, Charles 
Anthony Goessman, and Henry Hill 
Goodell, who, the speaker declareel, 
through their untiring efforts and sterling 
character, have been very largely re- 
sponsible for the development of this 
ceil lege. 



DEBATING TEAM LOSES 

.( Inn tinned from Pa tit- 1) 

The (i nest ion which the two teams 
undertook to settle was: Resolved, that 
the United States should cancel the loans 
made to its associates during the World 
War. The M.A.C. team, composed of M. 
II. Goldberg -'*, H.J. Harris '27, and R. 
W. Haskins '27, upheld the negative; 
while the team from Washington, whose 
Dseeabers were W. A. McSwain, J. T. 
Trimble, and W. F. Williamson, defended 
the proposition as stated. 

The manner in which the visitors pre- 
sented their arguments showed plainly 
the results of much experience in debating 
with some of the best college teams in 
the Fast, while their opponents showed 
as plainly their lack of experience. The 
showing of the M.A.C. team, however, 
was far from discouraging, anil against 
less able opponents the result might have 
been different. 

President Lewis presuled at the debate, 
which was conducted on the Oxford plan, 
sivteen minutes being allowed each 
speaker. The juelges were Mr. W. C. 
Dreher of Amherst, Prof. J. W. Crook, 
and Prof. H. P. Callinger, both of Amherst 
College. 



'I Mi Stanley I . fclpTSS, consulting agri- 
e ultural engineer, sailed for South Ameri- 
ca U) investigate soil and sugar cane pro- 
ductiofl problems in British Cuiana for 
an English sugar company. 

'l)S Dr. W. S. Regan is now in the 
service of the California Spray Chemical 
Co., Yakima, Washington. 

'10 Josiah C. Folsom, secretary of the 
class of '1(1, is securing life sketches of 
the members of his class in order that his 
class records may be up to date. It is a 
mighty fine ielea and one that other class 
secretaries might consider. 

'10 George W. Paulson is principal of 
the Lnglewooel High School in New Jersey. 
'I"> Sidney M. Masse is pr eside n t of 
an advertising agency in Cleveland, Ohio. 
'IS Harold C. Fellows is associate re- 
search chemist for the Chemical Re- 
search Laboratory, (.rain Division, Bu- 
reau of Agricultural Fconomics, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

IS Laurence H. Patch is now on 
campus taking graduate work in ento- 
mology during the winter and spring 
terms. 

'21 Peter J. Cascio has recently been 
elected p r esi d en t of the Connecticut 
Hortic ultu ral Society. 

'22 "Abe" Krasker is employed as a 
teacher at the Fssex County Agricultural 
School at Hawthorne, Mass. During the 
summer he is a summer camp director. 

'2."> W. Chamberlain Frost recently 
accepted the position of instructor in 
landscape architecture, Kansas Agricul- 
tural College, Manhattan, Kansas. 

"25 "Pat" Holbrook, who recently re- 
signed his position with the (Greenfield 
Tap A Die Company, is now employed by 
the Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, 
Host on. 

I'll "Phil" Dow writes "Am learning 
to be a so-calleel merchant. May stay 
here three months or a year." He is with 
the Grant Stores. 

fa Carl A. Fraser rc|>orts that he is 
farm manager of the Chewonki Farm, 
Wiscasset, Maine-. 

A quartet from the Boston Alumni Club 
of M.A.C. broadcasted from WBZ last 
Saturday night in the series of Saturday 
evening entertainments conducted by the 
students and alumni of the College. Glee 
Club and college songs of some years ago 
constituted the program. At the piano 
was Frank Antlerson '18, now a stock 
broker in Boston, who has contributed 
several original songs to Aggie's reper- 
toire, and as a student was one of the 
authors of "Pluto's Daughter", a uniepje 
musical comedy. The quartet was com- 
posed of George E. Erickson '18 of Wal- 
tham, Gardner C. Norcross '18 of Brock- 
ton, Edwin C. Towne '15 of Waltham, 
and Roger W. Weeks '18 of Boston. 



Plans are being made- to form a I'resh- 
man Rifle Team. This will be done as 
soon as more men have finished shooting 
their four positions. Those who make the 
team will probably be awarded etas 
numerals. Freshmen ire urged to get in 
their shooting as soon as possible. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



The officials at Boston have decided 
that Captain Hughes can not have King 
Tut. The- college benefits by this elecision 
because King Tut is too valuable a horse 
to le)se. 



It has been found that four of the 
horses at the stable are pure breel thorough- 
breds. The Military Department is now 
looking up the records of these horses to 
see whether or not they are eligible or not 
for registration in the pure bred registra- 
tion book. At present about half of the 
horses at the stable are eligible for regis- 
tration in the half bred book. One of the 
horses is alreatly registered as a pare bred. 
This is Premature, a horse which was 
raised in Virginia. 



The- COLUOIAM t( Si all times (tod to publish 
any coiiuiuinic.it ions which may bd WBl to it, but 
the Kditon will i^sume no responsibility for the 

viewB i-x|ii<-s-i-<l. tad do not necessarily en! 
such views. 

THE COLLEGE BELL 

The old bell is respected anil loved by 
thousands of alumni: What i» there 
about an athletic victory that should 
make anyone yearn to rough-house the 
college bell? 

This bell has a peculiarly rich, sweet 
musical tone. It is a musical instrument 
comparable to a fine Steinway piano. 
Why should anyone who cares for the 
College want to insult the college bell by 
treating it like a cracked washboiler at a 
backwoods charivari? 

Is it not possible to have some per 
spective in college demonstrations? I or 
example if our all-America team shoulel 
win a game of hopscotch from the 
Belchertown State School would it hi 
necessary to disable the college bell for 
life? 

Frank A. Waugh. 



As there were no matches fired last 
week there is no honor roll. The team 
shot some more targets for the First Corp 
Area match. 

The results of the match with the 
University of Nebraska are as follows: 
M.A.C. :1447, Nebraska ."5442. The team 
was beaten by the University of Dayton 
3624 to .1447. 



FACULTY NOTES 



TWO-YEAR PERSONALS 



COMPULSORY CHAPEL 

What is the purpose of morning chapel? 
Certainly it is not religious. There is no 
need for going into the question of 
religion at this college, or discussing the 
importance of religious exercises, because 
morning chapel as now conducted, is not 
in any way religious. It is true that a 
chapter of the Bible is occasionally read, 
or a prayer offered — during which the 
students sink into the somnolence of 
utter boredom — but this is the exception. 
In general, chapel is used for some of the 
following: for the reading of notices; for 
making athletic anel academic- awarels; 
for explanation to the student body of 
the administrative and legislative con- 
ditions which may affect the college; and 
for giving certain professors a chance to 
talk at the student body on subjects in 

which they pre suma bly are interes t ed. 

These are the uses of morning chapel; 
and not one— or all of them — justifies it! 
The notices could as well be posted on 
bulletin boards, or printed in the Collegian ; 
athletic and academic awards might better 



Some of us may have been unaware 
that we had an artist in our midst until 
the other night when Maclntyre held an 
auction of his paintings and cleared 
around $20. Walter Shea acted in the 
role of auctioneer and was very success- 
ful as the results show. The highest price 
paid for any one picture was $2.85 and 
some rare battles were staged between 
the art connoiseurs, one of the most 
interesting being that between "Kayo" 
Cook and "Socko" Starkweather. 



Prof. Clark L. Thayer went out to 
Cornell recently, where he gave several 
lectures in connection with the Farmer's 
Week program. His first talk was on 
"Hardy Bulbs for the Home Garden" 
and his second talk was on "Some De- 
sirable Annuals". Professor Thayer also 
spoke at a meeting of the American 
Gladiola Society held in Horticultural 
Hall, Boston, on February 12. 



TWO-YEAR NEWS 

About 120 Two- Year alumni attended 
the fifth annual banquet of the Two- 
Year Alumni Association, held at the 
Memorial Hall in Springfietld last Satur- 
day evening. The committee in charge 
of the banquet was Chester C. Allen '21, 
chairman, Ernest C. Yan Derpoel '20, 
and Albert G. Markham '22. 

L. S. Longley '24 was the toastmaster 
and the following people spoke: Miss 
Margaret Hamlin who spoke on "Interest 
on the Investment", Director Roland Y. 
Yerbcck on "Choosing Your Life Work", 
Bernard L. Kenyon, President of the 
1926 Student Council, on "Present Two- 
Year Classes", Edward M. Lewis on "The 
College", Paul VV. Yiets on "Why Be A 
Dead One?" and John J. Phelan, who 
was formally at M.A.C. and an ardent 
worker for the Two- Year course, was the 
hr/norary speaker. Mr. Phelan is now 
Dean of the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege. Rerard's orchestra furnished the 
music for the occasion. 



OVERTIME PERIOD GIVES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

the score read 18 to 12. Another spurt by 

the Agates, and Reed and Thomas raise. I 

the total to 17. Back came the visitors 

however, and tied the score in the closing 

minutes on baskets by Harris, Graham, 

and a gift shot by Rauha. 

The extra session saw the Agates 
decidedly superior. The visitors were 
drawn out, and "Roly" tossed one 
through the net after a perfect pass 
from McFwen. Criffin added a free try, 
and Thomas and "Part" clinched the fray 
with scores on rebounds. 

"Ray" Griffin's shooting was marvel- 
ously accurate, and his companion in the 
back court, "Squash" McEwen, playing 
his first entire game, deserves commen- 
dation for his coolness and good passing. 
Captain Harris of Tech kept his squad 
in the running with four counters from 
beyond the lo-foot mark. 

The summary: 



Mass. Aggie 






Worcester Tech. 








1. 


F. 


p. 




B. F. 


!". 


Reed. If 




2 





4 


Harris, rb 


4 (1 


8 


Crifhii, rf 




4 


2 


10 


Cotton, lb 








Thomas, c 




:» 





6 


1 .i.ili.im. c 


1 


2 


( 'onkus, c 







Q 





Gross, rf 


2 


t 


McEwen. lb 













Kauha. If 


1 1 


3 


Part'heimer. 


rl» 


2 





4 


Smith, if 









Totals 



S 1 17 



Totals 11 I 24 

Score at half time — M.A.C. 9, Worcester K. 
Referee — Johnson. Time — 20-minute periods and 
5 minutes overtime. 



Prof. Richard T. Muller spoke recently 
before the members of the Deerfield 
Garden Club. 



The carnival at Brattleboro this past 
week end drew a bus load of our two- 
year group. The Brattleboro pilgrims 
had a conscientious chaperone in the 
truck driver who insisted that his charges 
should get home early, but nevertheless 
it was not until the "wee sma' hours" 
of Saturday morning when the group 
arrived in Amherst. 



"Bunny" Kenyon, "Rollie" Smith, 
"Bob"llallbourg, and Ira Wile attended 
the Two-Year alumni banquet in Spring- 
field last Saturday night. 



Joan is brooding over her chickens. 
Everything will hatch out all right! 



Blanche spent the holidays at Janet 
Whitcomb's home in Haverhill. 



About twenty-five couples attended the 
faculty dance held in the Memorial 
Building last Saturday evening. 



Prof. Victor A. Rice was in Wilming- 
ton, Delaware, the first of the week to 
speak before the Delaware State Holstein- 
Friesian Breeders Association. The asso- 
ciation held a meeting at the Winterthur 
Farm and in connection with the meeting 
they had a field day. Professor Rice 
spoke on "Live Stock Breeding". 



The cheese exhibit which was being 
arranged by the Animal and Dairy Hus- 
bandry department and the Home Eco- 
nomics department for February 24 and 
2"i has had to be postponed until March 
3 and 4 on account of a conflict with the 
ice cream short course. The two de- 
partments are making extensive prepara- 
tions for this exhibit, and it should be a 
Very interesting show. It is hoped that 
many will plan to see it one of the two 
days that it will be held at Flint Labora- 
tory. 



AGGIE FIVE LOSES 
(Continued from page I) 

double-decker, which, with a free try, 
completed the Maroon and White scoring 
for the first half. Counters by Bradshaw 
and Lee furnished the opposing points. 

Wesleyan abandoned its five-man de- 
fense in the next period, however, and 
was more successful at the individual type 
of play. Captain Partenheimer tossed a 
particularly long shot through the net for 
the first score, and Reed came through 
again. The hosts also tallied several 
times, and brought the score to 11 to 9 
in favor of the winners. "Blondie" 
Thomas tied the count on a follow-in, 
but thenceforward Wesleyan was supreme. 
Led by Captain Jack, Nichols, and Brad- 
shaw, they forged to the front. Three 
free tries and a floor goal by "Squash" 
McEwen accounted for the final points 
for M.A.C. 

The Wesleyan five were successful in 
making their long shots count, while the 
Agates also wasted very few shots from 
the floor. On the foul lirie, however, the 
visitors lost a chance to even the score 
by making good only 4 out of 12 chances 
wlwle Wesleyan was accumulating 6 
counters via the free try route. "Roly" 
Reed featured for the Agates, and Brad- 
shaw was the outstanding star for the 
Red and Black. 

This Saturday the M.A.C. team faces 
the most difficult assignment of the 
season, a game with New Hampshire on 
the latter's stamping grounds. A victory 
in this contest will remove all remem 
brances of defeats suffered thus far. 
The summary: 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

I PLEASANT STREET, (up oaa li**t) 

OculUU Prescription* Killed. BnkM Icmmcm 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and etfcer 
reliable make* 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICES 

viens Whole Soles. Rubber HeeU - - - •*•» 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber HeeU - • • LTI 

Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber HeeU - - *•» 

Men's Half Soles ■■*■ 

Work Guaranteed — Corner of Pleasant and 
Amity Sts. Open till 8 P. M . 




Mass. Aftftie 
B. F. 

McEwen, lg 1 
Part'heimer, rg 2 



Thomas, c 
Heed, if 

Griffin, rf 



Totals 



Wesleyan 
B. K. 



6 4 16 



Vancott, rf 
Nichols, rf 
Jack. If 
Bradshaw, c 
Lee, rg 

Travis, lg 
Sanders, lg 

Totals 





I 
2 

a 
i 






Referee- — Jackson, 
minute halves. 



Spring College. 



7 6 20 
Time— 20 



Get Started Early 

Early earnings if saved will 
work for you longer than any 
others. Avoid mistakes and 
losses by investing them in the 
Life Income Plan. 
A small annual deposit now 
guarantees you $15,000 later, 
or a life income if preferred. 
Meanwhile it insures your lire 
for $10,000 and guarantees 
you $100 monthly whenever 
disabled. 

A favored investment with 
young men who want to get 
ahead by a sure, safe method. 
For descriptive booklet, write 

Connecticut General 
Li*e Insurance Company 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1873- M 
Greenfield, Maaa. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. FEB. 2J, 1927 



The well dressed man does not always wear a Hickey-Freeman -But, the man who wears a IIICKKY-I RKI.M AN is always well dressed. 

SO THIS SPRINQ= CONSULT "TOM." 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



Our New Spring Shoes 

are beginning to arrive. Come in 
and look them over. You will be 
pleased with their individual char- 
acter. 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



NEW COURSES 
The' department of Animal Husbandry 
is arranging Animal Husbandry -".' to i« 

Offered in the' ihirel term. This course 

includes a survey <>f the- livestock Indus 
try. Tin- origin, bistory, development, 
characteristics distribution and adapts 
l)ilit> i)i each important bread «»f <l.iii> 
cattle, bed cattle, sheep, striae and 
horses are studied. Pteliminarj work in 

I h<- scoring "■ pun- bred animals accord- 
ing ie> recognised standards i> given 
which is followed l>y considerable prat 

tire- in judging anel placing ciaSBM <>! 

livestock. This course is espedalij 
arranged for students enrolled in the 

division e>f Rural Serial Science. 
2 e lass hours. 
I 2-hour lab. credit, ,'{. 

Professui Glatfeker. 
Survey of Business Accounting 
Course offered by the Depart mem oi 
Agricultural economics. 

I In- course in business accounting wh« h 
was necessarily omitted last year will !><• 
offered in tin- spring term as Agricultural 

Kroniunies 88, \ | H . (ollrs( . Ns j|| |„. [„ 

charge of II. C. Hawiey, • graduate of 

Olierlin College anel e>f the- Harvard 
School e>f MusiiU'ss. 

The see>| M ' ,,| the- e-eiursr is tei ^ive' a 

general isaderstanding of the methods 

employed by business units in leathering 
and iisin^ SfrOUn t hsg anil ee>st data. It 
sllemlel be- (if value' tei nun interested ill 

agricultural business oancerns each is 

milk plants, e.innerie-s, comparative assei 
cistkms, fe-rtili/e-r companies anel either 
agencies doing business connected with 
farm products. Those also whei are' 
interested in accounting for coinmire ial 
linns will tin* 1 the course Worth while. 
The course will Ik- olTereel tei a limited 

number of seniors and iuaiors and will 
include one discussion ihtjimI ami two 
two-hour ksboratory i>criods, for which ■ 
teital eii three credits will lie- given. 



ALUMNI NOTICE 

The attention >>t the- alumni e,i Middle- 
se\ Count) .mel all others who are within 
reach oi Concord is called to the- M \ .« 
Musical clubs concert .mel dance which 
will be given on Fridaj evening, March 
-i, at Concord. The concert will be gh en 
in the- Veterans' Building In that town 
commencing sf 8 p, m. Tickets m 7.v 
each, it has been mainly through the 
efforts («t James W. Dayton 'i;i and otbet 
loyal alumni oi Concord and \ icinit) thai 

lllls Aggk 'dee- Club concert has been 

arranged. 



Rural Home Life 52 

Will be Open to Men 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

MATI 
.«.00. 

I"\V Al 
Mi. II I 

7..10 

REG) I \i< 
I'Kle KS 

Npws .ma 
Pitblei 



Course in Dietetics No Longer 
Limited to Co-eds. 



\(\t term Rural Hume' Life S3, a course 
in dietetics, will be open to the- men eii the 
College as well as to the co eda, according 
to an announcement recently made' by 
the lleiine' Economics department. This 
course, which will be' given by Miss Helen 
Knowiton, is nf live- credits, consisting of 

tWO ( lass hours and tWO three- horns 

laboiatoiv per i od s . 

This cha nge has bssn brought about 
bscausa of the t.u t that djt*ttki is as 

imp o rtan t to nun as it is tei women. 
This ee.uise- deals with the si lid) ol the 

inoel requirement throughout infancy, 
ch ild hood, a rinle seance, adult Ufa and old 
age, cosnaoering the e n e rgy value- of looda 

and the nutritive properties of foodstuffs. 



Friday 

.too 

• .4.4, S..I0 



You wlU find an o-icallant 

. . . SHOE KM'AIKIM. SHOP ... 
equipped with the most up- to-dute Uotxiyum 
Machinery and a modern 

SIIOK SHINING PAKLOK 
at lit Amliy-si , . Opp. New Theatre 

lt'« understand your requirements and art pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shintd and dyed, Kk 
VINCENT GKANDONICO. Prop. 



New Vantine Goods 
Just in This Week 

Compacts and Incense 



DIAMONDS 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Robert C. Ames 

WATCHES 



Saturday 
too 

S.4I s hi 



' »* • " •*'*■ Bill I),,, ,i,i,. mil 

I In- i irui i , (lined) , \ , i 

in. el.- I IN II \ I s | |,,,,. 

\n .i i, .in (touahbo) - rai In! to 

Iwi i raved .i and Hh-v 

■ ■!,■ than the) were lin.k 

•i in the arm) , ( ,. ■ 

ii"n i li>- wai was "\ii Inn t.dk 
uhoui youi thrills mid 
I'ln inii . i .i i .. i, with i .. 

VlL'.'l .n|,| ( I., |, \\ I,,. I i.l ,|,,| 

I H I ISI I i IF KI- I Kl III 
I It |V - A dis Ipating son "I 
•i iMillmn.iiir gora tu Ma k., and 
i here is In-Ill , apt Ive I • \ ., In uu 

uiani I'h til Imposed hai d 

ihirM In- i~ ipui ted uu in i In 

Kill he lim ■, » hips the \ ill uu. 

lo> ,-. returns to 

Vlllil ll I .1 IC ll 111,111 



Neirinn Mn-.ii.'i in " | p 
STAGI rb i,i ..i 

(null Is throw ■ .n last mi i In 
life ni .i i/audet Hie "hoofei 

Mm iiiin tin- i.i-., Inatlna 
ii ,'i.ui 'bai i itage- and lets 

Mm look nun tin- In. HI ni .1 III 

i li- >imu and dam ( km I \ 
itned) drama sensation 

S|hh thulii and • ol I\ 



I'm. II Km„ . U l< I 1 1 > 

Or I III'. SEA Awhiilwind 
it. uu. i in rovine heart \ 

1 1 him-, , i, * .1 ma) . are i oi 
i ,ii.i. mi, twin brothel in .1 pla 

- .in Man 

I l\ Ingaton, l< lm r, l> Dun 

li,,t New - .mil < mi ir.lv 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
HOW'S YOUR RADIO? 
For Service call at . . 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST HANK 



HIGH GRADE 

REPAIRING 

46 PLASANT STREET 

Tel. 451-R Cor. Ilallock 

LOOK FOR THE BIG SIGN 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the season of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 



120 Pleasant St., 

First house south of campus. 
Telephone 511 



J 



NEW STYLES IN MALLORY HATS 

The Newest Spring shapes and colors are here and ready for you. Cravanetted finish that will stand plenty of hard wear Priced $6 and $7 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



»♦ 



"Ask Me Another 

The latest craze: 40 information tests 

Ray Stannard Baker rated 94$ 
Three average citizens made scores of 
» 52, 68 and 78. What do you rate? 



SAMPLE QUESTIONS 

What is a centaur.' 

Who discovered the X-Ray? 

What is the Bhoitest verse in the Bible? 

Who said "What this country needs 

most is a good five-cent cigar"? 
What is John D. Rockefeller's middle 

name? 
Who said "I would rather be right 

than be ptesident"? 



To Get the Best, Buy 

"MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers — Step-ins — Vests 

Combinations 



SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



1 930 

M.A.C. STATIONERY— OLD HAMPSHIRE VELLUM 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



New Spring Goods arriving daily — ties, shoes, socks and shirts — all at reasonable prices 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



I- JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST, MASS. 



The Beet in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



SING LEE HANP sundry 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Maai 

Our Laundry First Mass 

Our Policy Guarant**** 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. ^ . „ ^„ 

Opposite Post Office 



SPRING STYLfiSff 

\\\ haveiml received .i shipment of Bread 

New Spring Oxfords th.it ;ir«- Mire to suit 
c\ii J one. 

Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS 

Sr LF-SKRVICK SIIOK STORE 




Z .. . A _ { „ f8 tn an earlv Spring and we have made preparations accordingly. New Suits, Tt 

ClOt heS~ EV : r r r y ived n8 arsmr,: Za^d Hosiery. Come in and see the fines, lot „, c.o.hes we've ever had 



opcoats, Flats and Shoes have 
to offer. 



EXETER 



CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



HYANNIS 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23, 1927 



New Amherst Theatre 



Matinees daily at 3. 



Today 
Wed. 



Thura. 
Feb. 34 



E»eaia|i6:45«nd8:30 

Special uttrailion benefit St 
Briftid Parish. Amateur niftht 
with iteven bill local acts. 

Prices 

Matinee 20c, 48c Kvenlnfc 40c 

S1IIRI.KY MASON in 

•SWKKT ROSIK 0't;RAUV" 

Fel U Comedy 2 rael Comedy 

(George Sidney * Vera Cordon 

In "MILLIONAIRES" 
Short subject 2 rael C omedy 



Fri. 

Fab. 25 



Sat. 
Fab. 26 



CULLEN LANDIS In 

"MONEY TO BURN" 

Short subject 2 raal Comedy 



YE AGGIE INN 



Bean Contest 



YE AGGIE INN 



5 Acts Vaudeville 

RIN-TIN-TIN In 

"HILLS OF KENTUCKY" 

Pa the News Chrietle Comedy 



Mon.&Tu. 
Feb. 28 
Men. I 



Wad. & 
Thura. 
Mch. 2-2 



LEWIS STONE In 

"MIDNIGHT LOVERS" 

Pathe News Mermaid Comedy 



OPEN TO ALL— One chance with every 25 cent purchase in the store- (Not including candy or tobacco.) 
A chance to win a $5.00 Fountain Pen, $3.50 Pipe or $2.50 of valuable merchandise. 

CONTEST Closes March 1, 1927 



Tuckerman of Amherst College wil1 
apeak to the club about Outing and 
Hiking. This talk promises to be a very- 
interesting one as the Professor is well 
known in this sport. 



( lasses 

Senior 
Junior 
Sophomore 
Freshman 



1925—1920 
7X.33J 
74.01* 
73.98* 



lirst Term 

1926- ltff} 

7H 81| 

77.91* 
74 58* 
73 84* 



lllft double feature attraction 
Adolph Menjou In "SORROWS 
OF SATAN" Dolores Coetello 
ln"FINGERP HINTS" Georfce 
Lewis In "THE COLLEGIANS" 
Prices. Children lac. Adulta 40c 
"COMING ATTRACTIONS ~ 

Harold Lloyd in "THE KID BROTHER 
Clara Bow in "IT." "THE BIG PARADE- 



OUTING CLUB MEETS 



At the Outing Club's meeting last 
Wednesday night, plans were discussed 
relative to the program for next year and 
for the remaining term of this year. 
Among the various speakers of the pro- 
gram were Prof. Curry S. Hicks of the 
department of Physical Education, Prof. 
Ralph A. VanMeter, of the Pomology 
department, and Basil B. Wood, College 
Librarian. These men spoke on various 
subjects relating to outing and hiking 
and spoke of the wonderful opportunities 
for trail building in this part of the state. 

There is to be a meeting tonight at the 
Memorial Building at which Professor 



KAPPA EPSILON TOPS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

has taken the lead from Delta Phi Alpha, 
which has dropped to third. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon continuing to hold second place. 
Kappa Epsilon, Non-Frat. or Sor., and 
Lambda Chi Alpha were the only groups 
to increase their averages. 

The averages of the four classes con- 
tain much that is of interest to the stu- 
dent body as a whole. The number of 
students in each of the four classes with 
their respective standing is as follows: 



Averages 
90 or above 
85— flO 
80—85 
75—80 
70—75 
65—70 
60—65 
60 or below 



Two- Year Hoopsters 

Win From Lenox High 

Contest Close At All Times. 
Score 15—12. 



The summary: 
Two- Year 

B. F. V 



Olsen. If 
Parsons, rf 
Stuart, rf 
Holland, c 
Malceli, lb 
Chase, rb 



Lenox 

B. F. P. 

O. Driscoll, rb 

1 1 3 Laharz, rb 
P. Driscoll, lg 
4 2 10 Bull, lb 2 2 
Butler, c 
2 2 Bern'coni. rf 12 4 

Duclos, If 3 6 



Totals 5 5 15 Totals 4 4 12 

Referee— Martin. Time — 8 minute periods. 



'27 


•28 


•29 


•30 





5 


2 


1 


13 


12 


8 


12 


23 


24 


17 


24 


26 


33 


35 


39 


17 


20 


42 


50 


5 


10 


20 


30 


1 


2 


8 


17 








2 


4 



The Two- Year basketball team defeated 
Lenox High by a score of 15-12 in a hard- 
fought game played on the latter's home 
floor last Tuesday. The two teams re- 
mained on even terms almost throughout 
the game, the score being a nine-to-nine 
tie at the half. In the last of the game, 
however, the Two- Years pushed ahead of 
their opponents, to win by a precarious 
three-point margin. 



On Sunday, Feb. 27, there will be held 
at the Memorial Building a discussion 
led by Prof. Phillips Bradley of Amherst 
College on the topic, "The Christian 
Attitude Towards War". This discussion 
is under the auspices of the M.A.C.C.A. 
In it will be taken up such current topics 
as the Cancellation of the War Debts, 
the situation in Mexico, and various other 
subjects now before the public. 




WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



85 



106 



134 



177 



It is of interest to note that the class 
of '27 has the greatest percentage of its 
members above the grade of 70, having 
93% of its enrollment within this classifi- 
cation. The Junior class ranks next with 
88.5* and the classes of '29 and '30 with 
77.5* and 71.2* respectively. 

The average standing of each member 
in the four classes is of still more interest. 
The three upper classes have raised their 
standings from that of last year with the 
exception of the Seniors. 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A Bne place to fto and take your friends for 

LUN CH or DIN NER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Freeh Fruits, Refreshment, and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to he Mailed. 

SMOKES OF ALL K INDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 




WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



r Meeting a train in the Union station] 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



You are an experienced smoker 
and you know your brand! 

YOU'RE an experienced smoker, would not be far and away the 

You know good tobaccos. You first. If Camels weren't quality 

know taste and fragrance. supreme, they would not be the 

And you insist on the best— overwhelming preference of smok- 

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tobaccos grown are good enough Your taste tells you the tobacco 

for you — the experienced smoker, difference in cigarettes and you're 

Whatever you do you are going to going to smoke the best. Your 

do right, if you know it. advice to others is — "Have a 

If Camels weren't the best, they Camel!" 
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



Ready to wear and Tailored to Order 

Our showings of foreign and domestic fabrics in Spring Topcoats, Suits and Sport clothes is more complete, comprehensive and appealing this seaso 
than ever And what is more we guarantee satisfaction. Is it any wonder tHat well dressed men insist on buying their clothing here? 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUjj, 



OUR FRIGIDAIRE 

KEEPS 

ICE CREAM 



RIGHT 



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M BUILDING 

BY COUNT 

WE CARRY 75 VARIETIES OF CANDY 



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OUR JEWELRY 



jgfrg fMaBfiariittflgttfl (ttnUwmt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1927 



Musical Clubs Give 

Social Union Concert 

Dr. Davis, Local Music Critic, Makes Favorable Comment 

on Entertainment 



lluhn 
Speaks 



On Friday evening, February 25, the 
College Glee Clubs assisted by May Real 
(nice, violinist, Luther Arrington, piano 
accompanist, and Post ley Sinclair, bari- 
tone, presented the following program as 
one of the Social Union concerts. 

1. Aggie. My Aggie 

There is a Certain Valley 

Combined Clubs 

2. Invictus 
Sylvia 

Men's Quartet 1 ' 

3. Ave Maria Schubert-\V ilhelmi 

May Rees Cance 
Accompanied by Luther Arrington 

4. Autumn Storms Grieg-Page 
My Mar K uerite I lading 
Around the Gypsy Fire Brahms- Ambrose 

(.iris* Glee Club 

5. Aria "Eri tu" from 11 Ballo in Maschera Verdi 

Postley Sinclair 
Accompanied l>y Mr. Richards 

6. My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land 
Proposal 

Double Quartet 

7. {*) Mermen 
(b) Spanish Dance 

Mis. Cance 

8. My Tender Songs Would Be Flying 
l^ughtertown 



Blew 

Brickett 

|f« ST* 

Rehjeld 
llahn 

Big Brown Bear Mana/.uc cz 

Girl's Trio 
9. (a) The Unforeseen *••* 

(b) Trade Wind* Ketl 

(c) Hoi Jolly Jenkin Sullnan 
(Friar Tuck's song from Ivanhoe) 

Mr. Sinclair 
10. Rolling Down to Rio German 

O Captain, My Captain Anderson 

Speaks-I'alduin 

Men's Glee Club 
11 When Twilight Shadows Deepen 
Alma Mater 

Combined Clubs 

May Rees Cance is a violinist of ex- 
ceptional ability and is well known to 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



HONOR SYSTEM GETS 
VOTE OF CONFIDENCE 



Student Body Backs Up Council in 
Forum Discussion. 



Morning 



Senior Class Elects Com- 
mencement Committee 



Also Decides to Hold Smoker 
Friday Night. 



At a meeting of the class of 1927, hold 
after Assembly last Wednesday, a com- 
mittee for Commencement Day «M 
appointed, consisting of the following: 
mm Etta M. Buckler of Pittsfield, Robert 
C. Ames of Falmouth, William G. Amstein 
of South Deerfield, A. Roger Chamberlain 
of Springfield, Edward A. Connell of 
Maiden, William L. Dole of Medford, 
Raymond G. Griffin of Southwick, George 
I Match of West Roxbury, Otto II. Rich- 
terof Holyoke, and Neil C. Robinson of 
Arlington Heights. 

The class also decided to hold a smoker 
on Friday, March 4, in the Memorial 
Building. D. Lincoln Galanie is in charge 
of this matter. 



Student Forum took the place of 
regular assembly exercises last Wedm-*- 
day, at which some matters of Immediate 
interest to the student body were dis- 
caesed. Raymond ('.. Griftn '27 was the 
presiding officer. 

The first matter, presented by Clarence 
A. Crooks '27, was that of the congestion 
around the east and west doors of Drapaff 
11. ill at meal times due to the freshmen 
being compelled to use these doors only. 
Crooks favored allowing the yearlings the 
use of the front door also, and, when a 
vote was called for by Krnest G. McYiy 
'27, president of the Senate, an over- 
whelming majority declared themselves 
in favor of it. 

Another subject under dist -ussion was 
whether or not smoking should l>o allowed 
in the men's room on the lower floor in 
Stockbridge Hall. Edwin J. Haertl '27 
spoke on this matter and pointed out the 
reasons for desiring this innovation. He 
said that if men had a place within the 
building to smoke, they could do so much 
more comfortably on cold days, and, at 
the same time, the front steps would be 
kept clean. A vote on this showed most 
students in favor of the change, but, of 
course, it must be referred to the execu- 
tives of the college and be approved by 
them before becoming effective. 

The next matter brought forward was 
the evil of writing initials or fraternity 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



*K 



Number 19 



Outing Club Takes 

Holiday Hike to Toby 

New and Shorter Trail to Cabin is 
Being Blazed. 



The Outing Club took advantage of 
the holiday on Washington's birthdav by 
taking a hike to Mount Toby. The party- 
left Amherst immediately after breakfast, 
hut KKM divided into two parties, each 
one making its way to the Faculty cabin 
by a different route. Professor Micks met 
them there, and, after having lunch, they 
came back in small groups. 

Dr. Clarence E. Cordon was the 

■ptakaff at a meeting held by the club 

last Wednesday, at which he ilelievretl an 

illustrated lecture on the Yosemite. Dr. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Battery Men 

Begin Work 



Coach Ball has Promising Material 
for Pitching Staff 



PROM. PRELIMS. ARE 

NOW ON SALE 



Arrangements for Big Event 
Well Under Way. 



DEBATERS FACE TWO 
CONTESTS THIS WEEK 



Vermont and Middlebury Opponents 
on Thursday and Friday. 



On Thursday and Friday nights of this 
»eek, the varsity debating team will 
journey to Vermont, in hopes of making 
up for the loss of the recent debate with 
George Washington University, by taking 
into camp the argumentative aggregations 
of the University of Vermont and Middle- 
bury, respectively, on their own platforms. 
The subject of controversy in both of 
these clashes is the same as that of the 
first debate in which the Aggie team en- 
gaged, namely, the cancellation of the war 
debts. Against the University of Vermont, 
however, the M.A.C. team will uphold 
the affirmative of the proposition, while 
against Middlebury they will take the 
same stand as in the G.W.U. contest, and 
defend the negative. 

The exponents of agricultural college 
e 'oquence may well expect to meet with 
better success on this trip, inasmuch as 
they have had more opportunity for 
Preparation, and have no doubt profited 
by the experience gained in their first 
debate of the season. It* is unlikely, too, 
that they will meet with quite such strong 
PPoisition as that furnished by the 
smooth-tongued Washingtonians. 



Junior Prom preliminaries are now on 
sale and may be purchased from any 
member of the committee. The orchestra 
has not been definitely signed up as yet 
but the committee has an excellent team 
in mind and hopes to be able to make a 
definite announcement in the next issue. 
The Saturday afternoon program will be 
filled by a tea dance lasting from 2 p. m. 
until G p. m. The Prom dance itself is 
going to be a real ball from start to 
finish. Tickets may be secured from 
"Alec" Hodson, Sigma Phi Epsilon 
House; "Jack" Amatt, Kappa Sigma 
House; "Brud" Brockway, Q.T.V. House; 
"Al" Cook, and "Jack" Kimball, both of 
North College. Get your tickets early! 



Animal Hus. Students 

Make Trip to Boston 

Visits Made to Several Large 
Packing Houses. 



Last Monday the students in Animal 
Husbandry 54 and those in Animal 
Husbandry S7 travelled to Boston to 
inspect several of the large packing 
houses of that city. These students were 
under the supervision of Prof. Victor A. 
Rice, Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry, who conducted the trip. 

Among the establishments inspected 
were the "North Packing and Provision 
Co.", the largest pork packing company 
in the east; the "Sturtevant and Haley 
Beef Packing Co."; and the "New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Co." 

This trip was planned with the idea of 
giving the students a first hand knowledge 
of the meat packing and dressing industry 
and of making possible an intimate survey 
of the magnitude as well as the purpose 
of meat packing houses. As all of the 
places visited were up-to-date in every 
way the group had the opportunity of 
seeing a modern industry at its best. 
Incidentally, it may be said that this 
industry is one of the three greatest in 
the United States. 



Signs of spring received further eon 
firtnation last Wednesday allcrnoon when 

battery caadidatai for the i ( .)U7 baseball 

nine repor t ed to Coach "Red" Ball at 
the Drill Hall. "Norm" Naah, inainst.iv 
on the mound last year, headed the list 
of hurlers. "Tcedy" Crooks, "Johnny" 
Kuzmeski, and "Bozo" Tufts, three sub- 
stitute twirlers with considerable ex- 
perience on the s<piad were also on hand. 
The number was further increased by the 
appearance of several candidates from 
last year's frosh team, including "Bob" 
Bowie and "Bud" Howe. "Sam" Rice, 
erstwhile third baseman, is also trying 
his hand at pitching. 

On the receiving end, "Larry" Briggs 
and "Don" Lane reported for another 
season, and "Charlie" Walkden, freshman 
backstop last year, also came out. 

Five candidates for assistant manager 
from the freshman class reported: Burns, 
Campbell, Ronka, Wadlcigh, and W. G. 
Smith. Other aspirants for the position 
should see Burgess '2\) in the near future. 

Battery practice will Ik; held until the 
end of the basketball season, when the 
Drill Hall will be utilized for lulling 
practice for the baseball team until out- 
door workouts are possible. 

Manager Davis has announced an 
attractive schedule of fifteen games, five 
of which will be staged on Alumni Field 
Several promising trips arc in store for 
players on the team, including an ex- 
tended jaunt into Vermont and New Vork 
late in May. Wcsleyan will Ik- the 
opponent on High School Day again this 
year which comes on April 30. The 
1'niv. of Maine is a newcomer on the list 
this season. The dates are as follow--: 



April 19 Williams 

2.J W. P. I. 

26 Univ. of Maine 
M Wesleyan 

May 3 Clark 

10 Dartmouth 

13 Lowell Textile 

14 Tufts 

19 Univ. of New Hampghire 

21 Amherst 

27 Middlebury 

28 Univ. of Vermont 
30 Union 

June 4 Springfield 

11 Amherst 



There 



Mere 



There 



Ben 

There 



Mere 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"He wko seeks repentenre in the past, 
should uixj the anuel rirtuc in the future. 
— LyUon [Lady of Lyons) 



Wednesday— 

Varsity basketball: Middlebury, tBBfS. 
Animal Husbandry Club meeting, Mr 
James G. Watson of the New England 
Homestead, speaker. 
Thursday— 
7..iO Floriculture Club meeting. French Mall. 
7.30 1928 Index Board meeting. 
Varsity Debate: Vermont, there. 
Musical Club concert. 
Varsity basketball: Middlebury, there. 
Friday- 
Varsity debate: Middlebury, there. 
Seniors Class Smoker, Memorial Building. 
Saturday — 

1.00 I'bi SiKina Kappa House Dance. 

Fa. u 1 1 y Dane. Memorial Building. 
8.00 Varsity Track, KMth Infantry In- 
door Athletic Meet at Springfield. 
Two- Year basketball: Pittsfield High, here. 
Sunday — 
9.10 Sunday Chapel. Mr. Albert F;. Roberts, 
New York City. 
Wednesday- 
Varsity basketball: Tufts at M.A.C. 



Crippled Agate Te >£ 1 

G oes Dow J Fighting 

Quintet Without Captain Partenheinu' «5*»8es Tough Battle 
with Veteran New Hampshire im, 23-18 



TRACK TEAM LOSES 

MEET WITH TECH 



Loss of Last Event Brings 
Defeat, 39-J8. 



The Mass. Aggie relay team wis nosed 
out by the W.P.I, runners in the final 
event of the indoor track meet held .it 
Worcester on February 22, and Tech umi 
the meet by a 89 to .'IK wore. The Abates 
■en leading, 38 to 34, In-fore the deeisive 
relay. 

Dutch" SchappeHe contributed the 

largest ntmtlx-r of |M>ints to the M.A.C. 
total with .i victory in the 1000-yard run 

over Captain Meigs of Tech, and with .t 

><i ond DOatJoa in I he mile run, in which 
"Vin" llcnnelierry took first. "M.i. " 
Drawer c a p tur ed first place in the shot 
put on his last throw of ;i"> feet, 1 inch, 
nosing out Protovich of Won -ester. 
Notteli.iert, Mahoney, Hall, Kuy ,ui<l 
Woodbury also garnered numerous points 
for the Maroon awl White, nearly every 
in. in plat iii^ in I w " events. 

The showing of the team was especially 
good in that the squad was quite small, 
and each entrant had to take part in 
several events. All the members on t he- 
Aggie relay quartet had com|>cted in two 
runs, and were unable to match Tech's 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FRESHMAN QUINTET 
KEEPS SLATE CLEAN 



Defeats Smith Academy In Final 
Game of Season. 



The Freshman basketball team finished 
its season undefeated when it forced Smith 
Academy to accept the short end of a 
10-8 store in a game played in the Drill 
Hall last Tuesday. This was the eighth 
outside aeaee for the Frosh and the 
eighth win. 

The home team took the lead early in 
the name ami was never headed. Morawski 
was high scorer for the Neophyte-, with 
nine poiatetQ his credit. 

The summary: 



M.A.C. Frosh 

B. K. P. 



Smith Academy 

n. k. i*. 



A fighting Mass. Aggie quintet threw a 
stare into the New Hampshire tamp last 

Saturday, bm tvectuabed to ■ atroaaai 

team by | -cue of IS to 2:1. The Uil.l- 

cati preeeated ■ veteran combination 

which has lost only one encounter, a close 

struggle wiih Springfield Collage, tad the 

Agatee ewn head with n*. nicit otitis. 

Contrary to usual pitM edurc, t he 
Annies broke into the ■eefiaf column 
early in the contest, two Hoot goals and 

a loul eetabliehing a lead of 6 to 1. 

"Mlontlie" Thomas was responsible for 
the double deckers with two long shots 

from beyond the I0»foo4 nuv.h D.ma 
Webber, playing in place d I aptain 
I'.iiti nhciiiii r, *ho was kept out of the 
game with an injured ankle, also con- 
tributed a basket after a cut. New 
llainpshiie ktpi ad. ling points, and the 

a ore was i.i to i i in favor of tan Gnuttta 
Statera .it half time. 
The next aaajioa s.,w the Wildcat* at 

their beat, although the Abates took 
advantage of every o|>cning to keep the 
struggle cm iting. Only two scores w. ai 

made from arrimraagn TompUna drag* 

pad in one Iroin under the basket, ami 
"Ray" < it illin tallied last with a long shot. 
Bridge anil Craig .ontimiid to find the 
net for their opponents, however, and the 
final count was 2li to IS. 

The foul shooting of the M.A.C. team 
was of a much ln-tter ortler than that 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 



Kmi-i l.uul, If 
HiTiianl. If 
Norawttlci, rf 
Hut lu nk . C 
Mann, lb 
Takxarian, rb 

n.iii. rb 



Hyrtu. il. 

Doimis, ill o 
4 1 !> < "l.,tka, lb 1 2 

1 o i, Waist, c 10 2 

o • naaefamitc o o fl 

1 2 Sullivan, rf 113 
o o n Jubinvillc, It Oil 

Yarrows. If 



1 O 2 



Totals 9 1 19 Totals 3 2 8 

Ki-fc-ric- Mi Kwi-n. Time- K-minute periods. 



College Wins Prize 

At Boston Exhibit 



Display of Apples and Orchard Equip- 
ment Attracts Attention. 



The display of apples and orchard im- 
plements put on by the College at the 
exhibit of the New hngland Hardware 
Dealers' Association in Boston recently, 
was awarded a large silver cup, as the 
Deal of the 150 or more exhibits shown. 

The College exhibit presented a con- 
trast between perfectly formed apple-, on 
a tree properly pruned and sprayed with 
modern equipment, and much poorer 
fruit on another tree, the result of poor 
methods of pruning and spraying. In 
addition to the pruning and spraying 
materials, the exhibit showed the com- 
parative value of good and poor fruit in 
making fruit products, and displayed 
modern equipment for home manufacture 
of various preserves. In connection with 
the College display, nine thousand per- 
fectly formed apples were given away by 
the Hardware Dealers, the Massachusetts 
Pomological Society, and the College. 

Those in charge of the College exhibit 
were William K. Cole, Extension Professor 
of Horticultural Manufactures; William 
H. Thies, Extension Professor of Pom- 
ology; and Earlc S. Carpenter, Super- 
visor of Exhibits. 



Two-Year Team Loses 

to Sacred Heart, 1 I -4 

Visitors Forge Ahead After Falling 
to Score in First Half. 

Coach "Red" Ball's Two- Year quintet 
was a loser to Sacred Heart 11-4 al the 
Drill Hall last Friday evening. The 
game was marked by defensive work, the 
only store in the first half being on a 
free try by Olsen of the Two Years. In 
the la>t part of the game the visiting 
tc.iin managed lo Mtik five baskets while 
their Opponents' Called tO shoot accurately 
enough to keep even with them. Butters 
and (bait- did good woik on the defense 
for the Two- Years, while Sheehan '< 1 
tureil for Sai nil | leart. 

The summary: 

Sacred Heart Two- Year 

i« f. i* n I-. i*. 

Mi.-. -dan. If -i •> Itutt.M. rb O o 

M.t aiUiv, if 1! II 4 t ha..-. II, O ll o 

UmmM, i <» Hsaani,< o 3 3 
Burks , H. o it o Pananai >f o " o 

li.ni.y.rb 1 1 Olw-n, If I 1 1 

Totals 111 Totals 4 4 

ir at balf timt- T*M VSH I.Sa. rr<| Hrait O. 

Referee Mi Kwm. Time MIX 10 H rum |-iiods. 



WINTER TRACK TEAM 

FACES LAST MEET 



Will Compete at 104th Infantry Meet 
at Springfield Saturday. 



Coach Derby's winter track team will 
conclude its sea-ton this Saturday evening 
at the lOeth Infantry Indoor Athletic 
Meet at the Springfield Armory. Several 
ontmben of the squad are enteretl in 
special events, and the relay team will 
alvi run against Springfield College in a 
I2IX) yard i ottege relay. 

Schappette will c o m p ete against I.eness 
of M.I.T. fame in a fff*ftl KHU-yanl 
handicap race, and is also a strong 
candidate for honors in the open 1000- 
yard run in which he placed last year. 

Hall and Kay will enter the 300-yard 
dash, and should win positions in that 
event. Hall qualified for the finals last 
winter, but fell in a collision while enjoy- 
ing a favorable position. Some member 
of the squad will also be entered in a 
special invitation 50-yard handicap dash. 

Henncberry will attempt to duplicate 
his Worcester performance in ihe open 
mile, for which a beautiful trophy is 
offered by the Rolls Rovit- Company "I 
Springfield, while I oh v ami V.ttebaert 
will try for honors in the H MX) yard run. 
Springfield firms are contributing numer- 
ous prize- io stimulate c o m p e t ition in 

this meet 



- - t 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1927 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, I'uplishcd every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OP KDITORS 
William L. Dole '27 Editor-in-Chief 



Bllswokih Baknakd '2K 



Managing Kditoi 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

William L. Dole '27 

Harold K. Clakk '2H 

W. Gordon Hunter "29 

Howard W. Hunter '30 

Ernest L. Spencer '2S 

John B. Hdward Jr. '30 

Eric Singleton 10 

Faculty fc Short Courses Edward H. Nichols '29 

Intercollegiate Editor Josephine Panzica '28 

PeraonaU Editor Frances C. Bruce '27 



Editorial 
Athletici 



Camp iii News 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charles F. Clagc "27 Business Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Advertising Manager 

John E. White '27 Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Loring '28 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 

Harold K. Ansell '29 

Lawrence A. ' "arrutii "29 

William A. Ecan "29 

Frederick D. Thayer. Jr. 29 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



ol tlie BottOII Aggie Chili on March 20. 
This sliouM DO .t big lime for Aggie nun 
since tlie Club is entei t:iining l'nxy for 
tlie ftnt time siiuc lie KM BUUat pn ikfent 
(.1 MAC. The uiulergraduati s will be 
admitted at reduced prices and their 
pretence is especially desired. It comes 
during vacation you notice. For particu- 
iais scc k (.ip Goodwin or next week's 

Collegian. 

* » * 

This is our next to the last issue. Some 
may see more brilliant holies for the 
future of the Collegian now. 

* * * 

The Musical Clubs make their annual 
trip to the eastern end of the state Friday 
and Saturday. Tell your friends in the 
neighborhoods of Concord and Rutland 
to get in touch with M.A.C. through them. 

* * * 

Let us reiterate that we should have 
an appointed applause leader at Social 
Union. In addition, some were crude 
enough to laugh boisterously at a solo in 

Italian. 

* * * 

There are ten more days before Final 
Week. 



PERSONALS 



Entered as Fecond-cla^s matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at ape* W rate 
of postage provided for in section 1103. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



LETS ALL DANCE 

As we prepare to turn over our smug 

position to someone else we discover that 
we have run drj oi subject matter. It 

,„ay DC that we are tOO la*} to dig around 

tor something, to critkiie. But in view of 

thi> situation, the time is good for u> to 

, nt .m idea that has been brought to 

our attention on several Occasions; namely 
every college man should know bow to 

.lame and he should have experience in 
wearing a tuxedo. Dancing is the beat! 

way to bring a mixed crowd of people 
together. The college man, whether he 

is or not, should be well versed in getting 

along with hi> neighbors, lie should 

' II the trick- of the trade, so to 

Moreover, social grace it one <>» 

iga which is expected of the man 
■ been graduated from any college 
comparatively recently. It may l>c a mis- 
placing of values (we think not), but the 
fact remains that the general public so 
place them. 

Since formal affairs are a large part of 
the social activities outside the college 
gates, the tuxedo part of the idea is also 
important. What is more humorous and 
pathetic than a man who is slovenly in 
wearing bis tuxedo? In many cases the 
fault is in the innocent ignorance of the 
wearer. If he had attended a formal 
dance at college, bit outspoken fraternity 
brothers would have impressed on him 
the fact that something was wrong and 
some kind soul would have offered con- 
structive criticism. Thus it is that the 
idea that every college graduate- should 
be able to hold his own at a formal dance 
has been justified. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

Mrs. A. 15. Beaumont, who has l>een 
coaching the Musical Clubs this year, is 
to l>e congratulated on her success with 
these organizations. She has spent many- 
hours more than she was required to with 
them and she- has developed groups which 
have excelled any similar groups at M.A. 
C. in recent >cars, witness the honest -to- 
God encore which they received at the 
Social Cnion concert last week. 

* ♦ * 

Now that the student body has ex- 
pressed itself for a smoking room in 
Stockbridge Hall, how much is it going 

to mean? 

* * * 

The freshmen are now entering the 
dining hall through the middle door. The 
next step is to recpiire them to use this 
door. We hope no returned sophomoric 
alumnus commits a faux pas. 

* * » 

We suspect that Adelphia's references 
to the furniture and wall artists did not 
include the use of rubber erasers. 

* * * 

Probably everyone present carried some- 
ideas away from Chapel last Sunday, but 
Dean Mae Inner and the- organist who 
were treated with special attention. 

* * * 

Provisions are being made for under- 
graduates to attend the- special meeting 



WITH THE ALUMNI 



TWO-YEAR NEWS 

Last Saturday evening the Kolony Klub 
held a farewell dance in the Memorial 
Building. This dance was in the nature 
of a farewell to those Freshmen who go 
out next term on iheir training jobs. 
About forty-five couples danced to the 
music of an orchestra from llolyoke from 
eight until twelve. The chape-rone s were 
Prof, and Mrs. Harold W. Smart, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ilawley, and Mrs. \V. T. Owens. 



Albert L DonneUon '--, who is mana- 
ger of the Quonquont Farm at Whately, 
recently spike before the Two-Year dast 
in Agricultural Economics, The Quon- 
quont I arm is owned by -r. F. C Wells 
and is a Very exe client example of a first 
i lass dairy farm. Mr. Domullon has 
been manager of the farm since 198&. 



The Two Year classes in Agricultural 
Economics, Animal Husbandry, and 
Poultry, visited the- market district of 
Boston the first part of the week to 
inspect poultry marketing and storage 
facilities as well as various other packing 
concerns. Miss Mary A. Foley, Miss 
Marion G. Pulley, and PiOllSSOl Victor 
A. Rice accompanied the group. 



The Theta CM fraternity held a very 
lively Bowery Brawl last Saturday 
evening. The women wejre some very 
clever costumes and the men were well 
arraved in their old clothes. 

P 

Howard Hunter left the campus Friday 
for West Point. 

P 

Cordon Ward '25 is taking a graduate 
course in economics at Columbia and is 
working as statistician for the Pacific Egg 
Company, in New York. Next year, he 
plans to go to Minnesota to study for 
his Ph.D. 

P 

Those in the Military Department state 
that they are most grateful to whoever 
fixed the south face of the Chapel clock. 

P 

A certain member of the M.A. CCA. 
cabinet was seen reading "Will Skirts be 
Shorter?" during a meeting. 

P 

Coach Derby was the winner in a bowl- 
ing match with Manager Frank Stratton. 

P 

"Where are you going my pretty maid?" 
The Abbey milkmaids creep out of their 
downy cots at 5.30 a. m. 

P 

Demie Calanie sagely remarks that at 
this season of the year^thc end of our 
money is gone. 

■ P 

Chuck Barr had a treat when Table 7 
held a banquet the other morning at 
seven o'clock. Dick Fessenelen was the 
toastmaster and Jack Kimball the mas. .it. 

P 

Lieutenant Lawrence Khoadcs is said 
to have missed three classes in order 
that he- might appear at his best in the 
rifle team picture taken last week, and 
then be missed Ottt after all. 

— 1> — 

Red Xottebaert burned his hand 
rather seriously Monday putting out a 
conflagration started by Dick Thompson's 

pipe. 



The new course in Coif Course Man- 
agement has created so much interest 
throughout New England that Monday 
a group of fifteen members of the New 
England Creenskee|>er's Association visi- 
ted the College. They were entertained 
by the Extension Service at the Lord 
Jeffrey Inn. In this connection it is 
interesting to note that Carlton E. Treat 
who is president of the association was 
at one time a student at this college. Mr. 
Treat is now supericntendent of the 

Woodland Golf Club at A ubu rn da le. Two 

other men who were on the campus 
Monday are alumni of the College. Frank 
H. Wilson, Jr. '(HI is secretary-treasurer 
of the- association and is su]K-ricntcndent 
of the Charles River Country Club. 
Marston Burnett. 2yr. '21, is superinten- 
dent of the Abermarle Coif Club at 
Ncwtonville. 



MILITARY NOTES 



The- match this week is to be shot with 
the Virginia Military Institute. 



Work is now going on to remodel t he- 
band room. When this is finished there 
will be places for each instrument and for 
the music. 



There is still room for more men in 
the band. With the arrival last week of 
the new instruments there came the 
security of the outfitting of all new- 
comers. Those who wish to try playing 
are- asked to give their names to Captain 
Reed, of the Service troop. 



The Kolony Klub will hold its farewell 
banquet, Saturday evening, March 12, at 
the Lord Jeffrey Inn. 



INTERFRATERNITY BASKETBALL 

Following is the standing of the inter- 
fraternity league to date. Four games 
are yet to be played. A.T.C. will face 
Sigma Phi Epsilon on March 1 at 7.15; 
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Gamma 
Rho will play on Wednesday, March 2, 
as will Phi Sigma Kappa and Theta Chi. 
The winners of these games will meet on 
Thursday to play ft>r the championship. 
The standing: 

/•.( . 
.833 
.833 
.606 
.500 
.500 
. 333 
.000 

. m 

.800 
.666 

.no 

. 333 
.200 

. 0(X) 

The leading scorers are as follows: 
Iloran .... M 

Mam • • • ■ : * x 

(•iandomenico . . 31 

Stevenson . . .34 





If. 


L. 


P. S. K. 


■ 


1 


T. C. 


5 


1 


Q. TV. 


4 


2 


A. S. I*. 


3 


3 


K. S. 


3 


a 


L. C. A. 


2 


4 


K. K. 





6 


A. C,. R. 


5 


1 


S. I'. K. 


4 


1 


n. r. 


4 


2 


i). P. A. 


3 


3 


K. K. 


2 


1 


A.T 0. 


1 


4 


K. <".. V. 





6 



The new instruments certainly are a 
beautiful set. With these M.A.C. should 
lie able to boast of as good a band as any 
institution in this vicinity. If the men 
can play up to the standard of their 
instruments the Military Department, 
and the College as well, will have some- 
thing of which to be justly proud. 



This last week the members of the 
rifle team had their pictures taken. 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 2. 1927 



The Military Department states that 
were it not for the seniors the town of 
Amherst would have been completely 
destroyed during the last week. But 
through the skill of the senior militarists, 
who fought the battles (on paper) the 
inhabitants were saved from certain 
captivity. 



'20 i 16 Stanley L. Burt writes of 
interesting experiences since graduation. 
He has engaged in farming in Cuba with 
"Fred" Poey. When the hurricane struck 
them last fall they lost everything. Since 
that time they have reorganized and now 
have considerable acreage of tobacco, 
peppers and potatoes. 

'26 Harry Block is now employed as 
a chemist in the U. S. chemical warfare- 
laboratory at Edgewood, N. J. 

'26 William K. Budge is working for 
his master degree at Penn. State. Hs ie 
a graduate assistant in Dairy Manu- 
factures. Address: University Club, State 
College, Pa. 

'26 Dominick DeYito has turned to 
education and is an instructor in mathe- 
matics at New Castle, Del. His home 
address is 1543 N. 33d St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

'26 Harold S. Jensen is a cnemist 
with Proctor and Gable Co., 4650 Winton 
Rd., Winton Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

'26 Edwin L. Tucker has gone in for 
dirt agriculture at Croton, Mass. Home 
address, Baldwinsville, Mass. 

w'26 Merrill A. Bee-m is employed in 
the Canal National Bank, Portland, Me., 
and writes that he is proud that he is an 
Aggie man. His home address is 71 
Lawn Avenue, Portland, Me. 

FG Kenneth B. Simmons is a land- 
scape architect in the employ of Aggie's 
illustrious alu.nnus, A. D. Taylor '05, at 
4614 P rO tpOCt Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

'10 Harold C. Woolle-y is an orchanl- 
ist at Montsweag Farm in Wiscasset, 
Maine. 

'O'.t Harold O. Noble is a landscape 
engineer at 'Terrace Park, Ohio. 

'17 Paul W. I.otham is employed by 
the Travelers Insurance Co. at Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

'21 Viola Cameron is teaching in 
lasthampton, Mass. 

'24 Russell Noyes is studying for an 
A.M. in Knglish at Harvard Graduate 
School of Arts and Science. 

'03 Philip W. Brooks is engaged in 
real estate in San Francisco. 

'17 Leland J. Graham is department 
manager for the New York Wholesale- 
and Jobbing House. 

'.HI Arthur N. Stowe of Mount Dora, 
Florida, has resigned from business. 

'04 "Mike" Ahcarn, head of the 
physical department of the Kansas State 
Agricultural College, will represent the 
Missouri Valley schools at the conference 
of the National Football Rules Com- 
mittee which will be held in New York 
City, March 4 and 5. 

'13 Herbert C. Brewer has just been 
appointed Director of the E ducati o n al 
Bureau for Chilean Nitrate of Soda. In 
this capacity he will have charge of the 
work of the Bureau in the Cnited States, 
Canada, Hawaii, Cuba and Porto Rico. 

Mr. Brewer brings to this work a very- 
varied experience. Following graduation 
from college he took service in Honolulu, 
and while there had charge of a number 
of different agricultural enterprises. Later, 
on returning to this country, he first saw- 
service with the sulfate of ammonia 
organization and later on became editorial 
manager of the Soil Improvement Com- 
mittee of the National Fertilizer Associ- 
ation. More recently still he has been 
agronomist for the organization which 
has just promoted him to the directorship. 
His address will continue to be at 57 
William St., New York City. 



Bowie 

Morawski 

Robertson 



28 
28 
26 



FACULTY NOTES 



Last Tuesday evening the Pacific 
Lodge of Masons gave a reception i„ 
Prof. Alexander McKimmie, in honor of 
his recent appointment to the position 
of district deputy grand master of the 
Mason if Order lor the 17th district 
This honor was conferred upon Prole 
McKimmie by the State grand worship, 
ful master, and it is a fitting recognition 
of several years of prominent service in 
the affairs of the Pacific Lodge, Last jfetj 
Professor McKimmie was worshipful 
master of the Pacific Lodge. Officers 
from the various lodges in the 17th dis- 
trict were present Tuesday night and the 
speech of welcome was made by Worship 
ful Master Harry Kidder. Refreshments 
were served and cards and a radio hel|je<l 
to entertain those who were present. 



Prof. William F. Robertson who has 
been instructor in Horticultural Manu- 
factures since he graduated in 1920 has 
accepted a position with the Za Ret 
Company of Boston and will probahly 
leave Amherst about March 12. He H 
to fill the position of a factory manager. 



A reunion of all the boys in Amherst, 
together with their friends and parent-, 
who attended Coach Harold M. Gom'i 
camp last summer was held at his bone 
last Thursday afternoon. The thrill of 
camp life and the joys of summer wen 
vividly brought back to the boys b] 
means of moving pictures which sjcr 
taken at Camp Lnajerog last summer. 



An annual reunion of Yak alumni was 
held on Washington's birthday .it tin 
Lord Jeffrey Inn. Among those who so 
listed in the Yale Alumni Directory U 
residents of Amherst are President 11- 
ward M. Lewis, Dr. Charles A. I' 
who received his Ph.D. in '01, Director 
Samuel T. Dana '07, Dr. George I 
who received his Ph.D. in '00, and Prof. 
Leon Bradley who received his Ph.D. in 
'25. At the banquet Dr. Peters gave I 
review of Yale from the undergraduate 
standpoint, as seen through the eyes of 
his son Anelerw Peters, who is a S0ph> 
more at Yale. 



Professor Victor A. Rice contrilmtnJ 
the leading article to the New England 
Homestead for February under the In ad 
ing of "Are You Interested in Br«dM| 
Steers?" 



Professor Richard E. Muller of the 
Floriculture Department has written an 
illustrated article on "The Little Ore-en- 
house and Where It Goes" for the March 
number of Garden and Home Builder. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEV\ PRICES 

Mens Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - - V •» 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels ... L» 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - • *•» 

MSB'S Half Sole* '•" 

Work Guaranteed — Corner of Pleasant and 
Amity Sts. Open till 8 P. M. 



Members of the class of 1918, who are 
located in or near Amherst, met at a 
dinner last Friday evening at which plans 
for a reunion of the class in 1928 were 
started. 

Last Saturday house dances were held 
by the Q.T.V. and Theta Chi fraternities 
in their respective houses. Both were 
very well attended and dancing con- 
tinued till midnight. 



Temple University's new library' >s to 
be dedicated to ths memory of Dr. Russell 
II. Conwell. More than 2000 volumes, 
which were a part of Doctor Conwell's 
private library, have been given to the 
University and will be housed in the new 
building. 



TRACK TEAM LOSES 

(Continued from Page 1) 
fresher team in the deciding race. Capt. 
"Stan" Hall ran a fast lap in the final 
quarter, however, reducing the handicap 
which had been handed him to about four 
yards. 

Woodbury, sophomore entrant in the 
high jump, performed very creditably by- 
tying for first place with a leap of five and 
one-half feet, and will probably be 
groomed to fill the shoes of Tucker, who 
graduated last June. For Tech, Milde, 
star freshman from Springfield, featured 
with two firsts. _, |g 

The summary: 

30-yard dash— Won by Milde, Tech; Mahoney. 
Attic, second; Kay, Annie, third. Time, Is. 

.'i0-yard hurdles — Tie for first between French, 
Tech, and Mahoney, Aggies; Wilcox, Tech, third. 
Time, 4 3-.">s. 

300-yard run— Won by Milde, Tech: Kay, 
Attic*, second; Hall, Aggies, third. Time, 3S Ml. 

One mile run — Won by Hennebery, Aggies; 
Schappelle, Aggies, second; Meigs, Tech, third. 
Time, 1..*.) I -."». 

(Continued on Page 4) 




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Look into it now for you" 
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P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield l^ 3 M 
Greenfield, Mast. 



^Mnttn ttt AmhprBi-- 1 kT n S T e /w in , hl ^^^^^^^^^'^autyof ■ Now ln0**d sprin* which It typi,i,J in the weaves and 
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newest models from Walsh's. 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



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many other College learns and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



FINAL EXAMINATION 

SCHEDl 1 1 

MARCai 14-19, 1927 


Monday, March U, 7.S0-9.S0 a. 

Prases -' in n caaai a 

i.t'imun 2 e, Bg 1 , Boc .">1 

(Julian) Ak l\ Tv 

AuEc2fl 113 & 114 Auron 77 

Drawt— ta wn lag 71 

AgK<156 102 Unel i. ..i,l K) 


m. 

*; M 

I 1 1 !• 

li- 
no 
in 

Wll 1< 



Monday, 10-W a. m. 

DrawL'ti lit II Wll 1 in ... 1 | k 

K.ii.i.iu- aj m laim um 11 1 * ii mm 

DtJn Bl PL Ii I ..ml I...I.I SI Wll H 

Bat 81 Bl D i hem si 



sa 

Bat II 

lien. I. .'il 

German ;.i i 



mi 
III e 



l<n BQ 1 
IMI ! 

\ ea <■•>"! 78 



Ml I" 

S18 

III l) 



-h | 



Baal 

Mi Psttmoa i n. ii ; 
Mr. I'lime- lio.i 1 1 

Mi. Kami lirj 



Wedm-iuluy, 10-12 a. in. 

Mi Ni. hobofl * ■ Ami 



I- nt 88 

lle.ii 71) 



Monday, 2-4 p. in. 

BS8 M G Ami • M (.eiiii.tn 8] II 

Hot -"-:« I'll B Micro 60 

t Melll OL' (, M I'olll 81 

lion :.i in c I'om If 



(. 28 



< ; SB 

M 18 
wn I 
in it 



Spring: 



Spring 



Tueaduy, March 15, 7.50-9.50 a. m. 



I* K-n. 1 1 '_••> 
<.ei mail . _ i | M 
I iii iii.in L'1» 
Mil M I 



III C 

G Am I 

I II A 



At U 81 lit, 1 1 t 

Bat 88 no 

111 1 I l.e.v .11 I'll K 

Math .'.:s MB B 



Kill he. 81 

Wn Card .">'_' 

7ii 
a w k>i 88 
i lie-in st; 
l'.mlt 77 
Yet 7ti 



Tueoday. 10-12 a. m. 

I CAsd, 96.88 Dairy 77 

H..t 88 Ilk II I luit M Iks 70 

> II A. I It D I ..ml liai.l 81 

l'om .".I Wll A V«t 7;» 



Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 



French .'. ill. v 



VII 

c An. i 



German 3 IV 



An II 



\ I 



I 

ua 



Atroa .".ii 

l- nt ..ti 

Hon 1 .'. 

French 76 
Hon M 



111 11 
II l Ii 

in 

l,r 

( . L'ti 

818 

VI. B 



11. M 

FLO 

wn 

VLB 



110 
I II K 

I II e 
Ml II 

II M 



Wednesday, 2-4 p. m. 

Pays 88 i I u < n \ An iins7t; 
Forestry at. i ii n i: n t 77 

K III Jfell KB K 



i 11 11 
i It K 

I II e 



Ml 

Ml II 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Thursday, March 17, 7.50-9.50 a. ni. 



Mil 2 
Gov 88 

Mil L'ti II 

At l-.l 88 

I Bfl 18 

Mil 81 



Bl U, t II A 

1 II I'- 
ll Ami 

ill 

111 

I. 2<1 



Spanish 51 

.\t l'.i 78 
I- nt w || 
Math 77 
Mil 70 



Thursday, 10-12 a. in. 



Our Spring Bostonians are beginning 
to arrive. Step in and look them over. 
They are better than ever. 

$7.50 to $10.00 

B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



W ftliu-s.l.lv 

Aa I- 

< beni 

i 
Math 

jr. 



March In, 7.50-9.50 a. ni. 



II I 

MB B 

i II A 



Matli :.l 

Mil In 81 

r.niit :.i 
At Bat 7s 



MB <; 

ill 

\ I. It 

IL' 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

I PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken letti 
eccurately replaced 
UK. BEN ALARM CLOCKS end other 
rellahle make* 



Hon °ii 

An 1 1 us 54 



t Ik- in 8 

Chen .'i 



ill f 

MM 

PL H 



Km 



Ml II 
Ml 

I n k 

M It It 
II I 1) 



I H K 
( II A 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

i \ 1 1 
.too, 

warn a i 

Ml. Ill 

7.. 10 



. i.W/| 
Blase e. Ihanrz's Novel 
•M IRK MISIKI M" (OUT 

► ••a «« nil .\ii« ■ Terr] * Aa 
leinlii Murcno. , The siraut 
SOt, tin- most I'lirtllliiil lavs 
ttorj svst shov.il aa the 
screen, Paajrad attalnst the 
liackitreiuntl of a world up In 
arms; Ii tells with ireinend 
•MS power a slory of passion 
and redemption mi. Ii 
).."'i|. never seen. 
News and h'ahle* Mable 

Normand In "Should Man 
Walk Home." 

Mat. Child, in. Adults J5c 
K.ve., Hoor, <V Hal., 40c 



Thursday, 2-4 p. m. 

ff. Ami 
( 88, Jn 



Friday, Match 
EatUoh '."» 
Mi. Prince 



n I 



7. 50-9. 50 a. m. 

Mi. Kami 101 

Mr. Ni, li..I . .it (. Ami 



Friday 

Ml (I 
4.45. 8..10 



Saturday 

.1.00 
b.45 h <ti 



"A I II II K JOIKM.V.' 
All aboard for the treads! 
little Joy-Kide ever a trip 
of unlimited fun and excite- 
ment on tin- overload limit 

ttl. A HaiiHi iiolliienlul e>- 
press takes a proud li.-atily 
Into ■ new world of thrills 
and romance. With Claire 
Wlndoor, Win. Haines and 
Harry Carey. 
Short Sol, J,, | i reel Com My 



lle.m Glbeon iii "THK in \ 
M-.K DUDB." lai.s .ii over 
I he country eta Un Mils ashls 
boot. With Blanch M.I...I- 

f.\ and directed hy Keavee 

Baaon. 

News and Comedy 



Mali. ■_' 

Mi Barber 

Ml. It.. .it. lie- 



I'riday, 10-12 a. 
Mr. 

Mi. 
G \ml 



m. 

M.i.lnmi M I! II 

Moon M BDIG 



At !•"• 81 
\t I ' 

\.i II.mSI 

1 . 78 
t hem 80, 8 



K5 



Hy Arrangement 
Para \i 

Mi. ... 51, 

S|,.inMi 7(i 
/....I M 



You will And an excellant 

. . . SHOE HI l-AIKINC SHOP ... 

equipped with the most up-to-date Good year 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOK SHINING PARLOR 

at 11) Amlty-St., . Opp. New Theatre 

H'« undrrsltind yuur ri-jinrrmtnls and art pre- 

pared la mttl your nttds. 

All work guarantied. Shoe! \hintd and dytd, SO, 

VINCENT GRANHONIGO, Prop. 



Attractive Gifts 
in 

BRASS, LINENS, ETC. 

at 
$ 1 .00 and less. 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. * 



DIAMONDS 

Robert C. Ames 

WATCHES 



Tel 



HIGH GRADE 

REPAIRING 

46 PLASANT STREET 
451-R Gor. Hallock 

LOOK FOR THE BIG SIGN 



THOMPSONS TIMK1.Y TALKS 
" There Ain't No Mayhe In My Baby's 
Kyt-s," played l>\ Paul Ashland, his 

( >n luMii. ( iiliiini.i.i record, No. x.'fiil). 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST HANK 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the Reason of '26 
and '27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

First boUM Miiith of c<mipus. 
Telephone 511 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON Offer these values for DOLLAR DAY, March 5. 
all wool bicuses, overcoats, sheep lined coats and all lined gloves. Topkis $1.00 Unions at 79c. 



Corduroy Breeches $5 grade at $2.75. 20 percent off 
Many other items that will save you money. 

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James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



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»• 



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Who discovered the X-Ray? 

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DEALERS IN 

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AMHERST 



»nly by 
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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1927 



GR1PPLBO AGATE TEAM 

i « on i in mil from Pujle I) 
di-played at Wcsh-van, for tin- Agau-s 
tallied eight times (ion) the free try mark. 
Webber was high scorer in this respect, 

since lie dropped four throng the hoop. 

Not surh good fortune was ex|>ciiciu eel 
with double deckers, lhouy.li, for several 
tantalizing attempts dipped out of the| 
iron ring. 

"Kay" Criftiii and "Squash" McKwcn 
lilayed a gre-at defensive game, intercept- 
ing passes and following in with skill. 
Tompkins was also very aggressive. The 
New Hampshire men were all larger than 
the Agates, and consequently the latter 
were hard pressed. "Blondie" Thomas 
was successful in getting the tap for 
M.A.C., but to no avail. Both teams 
used a similar type of play including 
position defenses. 

The physical condition of the M.A.C. 
quintet is very unpromising as it ap- 
proaches its final lap. Captain Parten- 
heimer has a bad ankle, and "Kay" 
Griffin has a "charley horse". Three 
difficult games remain on the program, 
Middlebury and Vermont abroad, and 
Tufts at home. The summary: 

New Hampshire Mass. Aftlile 



YE AGGIE INN 



Bean Contest 



YE AGGIE INN 



..:■■ x TO ALL-One chance with every 25 cent purchase in the store- (Not including candy or tobacco.) 
A chance to win a $5.00 Fountain Pen, $3.50 Pipe or $2.50 of valuable merchandise. 

CONTEST Closes March 1, 1927 



Crate, rf 
Cotton. If 
Clark. If 
Ke-lse-a. c 
Nkora, rg 
Bridge, tK 
Seliurman, lg 



. F. P. B. 1 I' 

3 1 7 McEwen.lg 

1 1 IS Griflin, rg 113 

Thomas C 2 2 6 

113 Tompkins, If 10 2 

1 1 Reed. If 

1 9 Webber, rf 14 6 




4 




l'art'lieiimr, rf 



Totals 
Referee 



9 5 23 
-Rogers. 



Totals 



5 8 18 



Mi. Si.- lair's solos NH accepted with 
applause. Numbers worthy of mention 
are: "Trade Winds" and "Ho! Jolly 
Jenkin!" His encore, "Mandy Lou", was 
exceptionally delightful. lloweyer, it 
would have pleased the audience if ■ 
soloist had been chosen from one of the 
( ,1. e Clubs since there is one worthy of 
the honor. 

( .lee club work by the Aggie girls is a 
new ovation. However, their perform- 
ance showed excellent training and results 
which pleased the audience. "My Mar- 
guerite" and "Big Brown Bear" presented 
considerable action and life which are so 
often lacking in Aggie's (dee Clubs. Con- 
sidering the number of girls registered in 
the College, this is a musical organization 
of which Aggie may well be proud. 

The Men's Cdee Club should receive 
considerable praise for their success this 
year. Several expressed the opinion that 
this year's club is one of the best to 
represent M.A.C. "They seemed to know 
their words, their music, and presented a 
good stage appearance." We are requested 
to mention two excellent numbers: "Roll- 
ing Down to Rio" and "Morning". 

The entertainment was very pleasing 
and worth while. Much credit is also 
due the coach whose untiring energy has 
enabled these clubs to succeed. 



Honor Council, reported for that body 
and gave a summary of its dealings since 
last Student Forum. He said that there 
have been seventeen cases brought to its 
attention, ten of which have been ac- 
quitted and seven convicted. A spirited 
discussion of the value of the Honor 
System followed, which revealed the fact 
that some think it to be a failure and to 
be entirely inadequate for our needs, while 
others consider it highly successful and 
to be functioning as well as might be 
desired. A rising vote of confidence- 
showed that the large majority of the 
students believed in it and favored its 
use here. 



district and helped make the slides which 
he used. 

The club members are blazing a new 
and more direct trail to their cabin in 
the mountain, which will save consider- 
able time in making the trip. 



OUTING CLUB TAKES 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Gordon accompanied a geological expe- 
dition from Princeton which visited this 



TRACK TEAM LOSES 

(Continued from Page 2) 

600-yard run— Won by Dan Lamay. Tech, 
Hall, Aggies, second; Nottebaert, Aggies, third. 
Time. 1.42 2-5. 

High jump — Tie for first between Topelian, 
Tech, and Woodbury, Aggies; Shreeve. Tech, 
third. Height, 5ft. 6in 

1000-yard run— Won by Schappelle. Aggies; 
Meigs, Tech, second, Hathaway, Tech, third. 

Time, 2.37. 

Shotput— Won by Dresser, Aggies; Protovidi, 
Tech, second; Carlson, Tech, third. Distance, 

35ft. lin. 

Four-man relay— Won by Tech (Carpenter 
Tabox, French, Milde); Aggies (Schappelle. Kay, 
Hennebtny, Hall). Time, 8.15. 




WINTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY 

at reduced prices this month 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



MUSICAL CLUBS GIVE SOCIAL 

(Continued from page 1) 

Amherst audiences. Her pleasing per- 
sonality, and excellent technique on the 
violin pleased the audience. She is to be 
especially complimented on her rendition 
of the Spanish Dance. Mrs. Cance was 
ably accompanied by Mr. Arrington at 
the Steinway. 



HONOR SYSTEM GETS VOTE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
letters on desks or otherwise defacing 
school property. Neil C Robinson '27, 
in a talk emphasized by well-directed 
sarcasm, urged the potential artists not 
to waste their talents here. 

George F. Hatch '27, president of the 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Oream, Milk Shake., Fresh Fruits, Refreshment, and Sodas, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

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SMOKES OF ALL KINDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 



• t 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 




When the plutarchs 
start plut arching 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



AT THE night sessions, when class philosophers 
vie with class Merry Andrews in deciding the 
heavy problems of the world— or burlesquing 
them — notice the royal guest, Prince Albert. 
Chiming in with the spirit of the occasion. Fill- 
ing the air with the finest tobacco-aroma ever. 

Do you smoke Prince Albert? It will bring 
you more pleasure and satisfaction than you 
ever thought a pipe could give. The instant 
you throw back the hinged lid and release that 
wonderful P. A. fragrance, you suspect you are 
in for some grand smoke-sessions. 

The very first pipe-load confirms your sus- 
picions. Cool as a gate-tender. Sweet as the 
week-end reprieve. Mild as the coffee in Com- 
mons — mild, yet with a full body that satisfies 
your smoke-taste completely. Get yourself a 
tidy red tin this very day, 

i>R!NBE ALBERT 

—no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. it told everywhere m 
tidy red lint, pound and half- 
pound tin humidors, and 
pound cryttal-flast humidort 
with tpongt-moittener top. 
And alwayt with every bit 
of bile and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert protest. 




O 1927, R. J. Reynolds Te*acco 
Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Ready to wear and Tailored to Order 

Our showings of foreign and domestic fabrics in Spring Topcoats, Suits and Sport clothes is more complete, comprehensive and appealing this season 
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Agricultural 

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gffrg iMaifflarfrttHgtta (foUrStait 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1927 



Number 20 



Debating Team Loses Two 
Contests by 2- 1 Decisions 

Middlebury and University of Vermont Win Decision by 

Narrow Margin 



On Thursday and Friday of last wt-ck, 
dn varsity debating team lost two split- 
decisioa contests to the University of 
Vermont and Middlebury. Although de- 
bated, the fact that in both casts the 

ea were divided in their opinion, so 
that the slightest circumstance might 
have altered the decision, shows that the 
nam has improved much since their first 
appearance here. 

In the debate at Burlington on Thurs- 
day night, the question was again the 

.llation of the war debts, but this 
time with the M.A.C. team upholding 
the affirmative. Apparently they failed 

to convince the judges of the validity of 

their case, for the decision was 2-1 in 

favor of the Vermont team, the m e m bers 
df which were Lawrence A. rHace, Carl 
II. Wcdell, and Emory C. Mower. In 

Loth debates the M.A.C. team had its 
regular line-up of doldberg, Harris and 
rlaaktns. 
I in Friday the Aggie debaters journeyed 

Middlebury, where they engaged in 
.mother argument on the same quest JOB, 

but iliis time defending the negative of 

the case. Although they did their Inst 
work of the season, the decision was again 
2-1 against them. The members of the 
Middlebury team were Samuel \V. Pattee, 
Edward F. I.andon, and (luy F. Page. 
Next Thursday night the M.A.C. team 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Animal Husbandry Club 

Elects New Officers 



Roper Will Head Club During 
Coming Year. 



At the meeting last Wednesday night 
of the Animal Husbandry Club, OSttCSCi 
ler the coming year were elected. Those 
kited are: Hartwell E. Roper of Closter, 
N. J., president; Miss Harriet E. Proctor 
of South Weymouth, secretary; Lloyd W. 
Jewitt, 2-yr. class, of Middlebury, At., 
ria president; and Charles G. Kellogg, 
-yr. class, of Benson, Vt., treasurer. 

The Club this year is to have control 
of the judging on High School Day. This 
event promises to be very interesting as 
the club has been very active during the 
past months in this matter. 

At the meeting the members of the 
club were given a talk by Mr. James 
Watson of the New England Homestead, 
who summarized the situation of the live 
stock industry in New England today. 



Seven Attend 
Big Conference 

College Well Represented at Meeting 
of Student Missionaries. 



Over last week end seven students from 

^1 AC. attended the Connecticut Valley 

Inti Ti ollegiate Missionary Conference held 

M Williams College. The official repre- 

ktfativce of the M.A.C.C.A. were: 

Charles E. Walkden '29, Miss Phoebe 

Hall '28, and Miss Elsie Haubenreiser '.30. 

Besides these there were present Miss 

ariiKta E. Sargent '29, Miss Irene L. 

I HartU-tt '29, Miss Margaret E. Swett '30, 

""I Miss Miriam Loud '30. At this 00* 

there were several prominent 

"-• A report is to be made in 

|dttpd soon. 

Last Thursday afternoon there was held 

lesion sponsored by the M.A.C. 

■A. under the leadership of Mr. Ap- 

y, of India, on the subject "The 

^"lon.ihstu; Movement in India". Mi. 

Appasamy spoke earlier in the day at 

e Rotary Club and as he had more 

eats that day it was very fortti- 

*n that he was able to speak to the 

poup here. He has studied at Columbia 

I niverMty, at Harper's Theological 

s *Ool 1 and at Boston University, and is 

the most ardent disciples of 

^n'lhi. M r- Appasamy is now one of 

e greatest spiritual and political leaders 

Mia, At the discussion he expressed 

"la that he thought missionaries 

*oul<| be welcomed in India today if 

\ ty ca,r >e in the right spirit. 



PREXY TO BE GUEST 
OF BOSTON ALUMM 



Undergraduates Also Invited to 
Annual Banquet. 



Cheese Exhibit 

Attracts Interest 

Several Hundred See Display by 
Dairy and Home Ec. Departments. 



An invitation has been extended liy the 

M.A.C. Alumni Club of Greater Boston 
to all undergraduates and special students 

of the College to attend the annual 

alumni banquet of the Chid. The banquet 
will be held during vacation on Friday, 

March 26, at li p. m. at the I'nivciMtv 
Club, which is situated at the < oi mi of 
Trinity Place and Stuart Street, Boston. 

Undergraduates will lx- admitted at the 
reduced price of 11.50, provided they 

secure their tickets at the Alumni Office 

before March 18. 

At this meeting the Club will entertain 

President Edward M. Lewis for the first 

time since he was made president of the 
College. Beside-, the alumni, < iovei nor 

Alvan T. Fuller and members of the 

(.Continued on Page 2) 



BOSTON ORCHESTRA 
WILL PLAY AT PROM 



Has Furnished Music for Proms at 
Ilatvaid and Yule. 



Those attending Prom thi- season will 
be favored by the iiiiimc of Parleys 
Breed's exceptional band of Boston. 
Although this team may Ik- unknown to 
main, it has distinguished itself suffi- 
ciently to play at !>oth the Harvard and 
Yale proms. The commit tee is certainly 
fortunate in U-ing able to secure the 
services of such ■ mnowned combination 
for the Junior Prom. 

It is requested that the president of 
each fraternity get in touch with Alec 
Hodson, chairman of the committee, as 
soon as possible in order to decide which 
houses will be given over to the girls 
during Prom season. 

Although this is primarily a social for 
the Junior class, many Seniors have 
signified their intentions of taking ad- 
vantage of this opportunity to attend 
their last Prom as undergraduates. The 
Junior class is backing its Prom with the 
same spirit that made the Soph-Senior 
Hop last Commencement one of the best 
dances for many years. 



Two-Year Five Drops 

Two Final Contests 



Season Record is Eight Victories 
and Five Defeats. 



On March .'i and -1 the Dak) and 

Home Rco no m ic s Departments staged a 

very BtSCOSSSfttl and well at tended cheese 
exhibit. Several hundred people took 
advantage oi the op|>oi t unit v to sec the 

many varieties of cheese that had been 

collected for this exhibit, and to leain 
more of t In- food value of cheese' and how 

these various cheeses could be used to 
advantage in the diet. 

Professors Frsndssn. Smith end Mack 
were e>u hand to explain to interested 
parties the names and merits of the 
various cheeses. Professor Know lion and 

her •.indent assistant! were kept busy 

demonstrating the man) ■^tractive dairy 

dishes tucfa as cottage- cheese pie, whey 
Hull, COttage cheese tarts, whey punch, 

and whey hone) . 
All the members of the- two departments 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Agates Trim Vermont 

In Startling Upset 

Burlington Paper Pays Tribute to M. A. C. Team in Account 

of 20 17 Victory 



EXPECT VICTORY 

OVER TUFTS FIVE 



Agates Hope to Knd Season With 
Victory Over Old Rivals. 



TRACK MEN WIN 
AT SPRINGFIELD 

Five Men Win Medals. 
Ilenneberry Breaks Record. 



Of the six men who went with Coach 
Derby last Sat lire lav lothe 104th Infantry 
track meet in Springfield, live- were fortu- 
nate enough to win at least one- medal. 
The most s|H-c tae ular thing, perhaps, ami 
the winning of the Rolls Royce Mile by 

Vincent rlenneberry '127, in the time- of 

1 minutes, BO seconds. In winning this 

mile Henneberry broke the indoor mile 

record which had been held by Roger 
(Continued on l*.»u«- 1 



New Art Exhibition 

In Memorial Building 

Display is Work of Birger Sandzen, 
Kansas Artist. 



The 1927 Ma ie basketball cpini 

let concludes iis season on Wednesday 
afternoon when Tufts conns to Amherst 

a- the- final opponent of the- year, The 
Jumbos have a formidable quintet, in- 

e hiding such stars as Kllis, crack shot and 

one of the has) forw ar d s in New England. 
The Agates are confident <>i victors, now 

ever, for the Vermont scalp hangs in the 
M.A.C wigwam, .nui Vermont has de- 
feated Tufts. 

Hie- M.A.t . players might well In- 
tel incel the big game- hunters. The 
Antt) Mule and the Maine- hears wrought 
heavy damage early in the season, and 
then the New Hampshire Wildcats and 
(Continued on Page I) 



PHI SIG WINNER IN 

INTERFRAT. SERIES 



Beats Alpha t.amma Rho in Final 
Came by 18 — 17 Score. 



The M.A.C Two-Years closed their 
basketball season with two defeats at the 
hands of Northampton High. Valley 
Champions, and the strong I'ittsheld 
quintet on Friday and Saturday of leal 
week. The first contest was lost by a 5 
to 17 count, while the Berkshire- team 
eked out a 17 to 14 win. Captain Holland 
featured for hw team in both encounters. 

The season as a whole has been success- 
ful, the Shorthorns having won eight out 
of thirteen contests, amassing Ht.'i point- 
to 147 garnered by their o ppo ne nts. The 

scores of the last two games: 



Northampton 




Two 


■ Year 






B. 


F 


r 




B. 


t 


P. 


Sullivan. If 


a 





4 


Bttttcn, is 





l 


1 


Holme*, it 











Steward, rg 


() 


ii 


(l 


J. Mille-r. It 











( !i.i~<\ Ik 


(1 





ii 


Meehan, rl 


t 





■j 


Holland, i- 


1 


•> 


1 


B. Miller, c 


a 





<\ 


I'.ct ->ns. rf 


o 


i) 


(i 


Ortitti. Ik 


i 


1 


■'• 


B, If 





a 


(i 


AUi-n, rg 


i 


II 


- 










Totals 


■ 


1 


13 


To- 


1 


'j 


.". 


R.-t. T 


iiH.ii 


MO 


i. 


Time 10-min 


qnal 


Pimfteld 






Two- 


Year 






g, 


F. 


P. 




B 


(- 


1* 


Bruno, rl 


6 





19 


( Bast, Ik 








(I 


0. Froio, rf 





1) 


o 


Butter-, rn 








n 


f, Froio. It 





> 


1 


Holland, ■ 


:t 


6 


13 


Controy. c 








n 


Otaat, it 











Foster, rg 





t 


1 


Parson ■*. rl 


l 





2 


Hebert, rg 








o 










Almstcad, lg 


1 





1 











The March exhibition of pictures at 
Memorial Building is something (|uite 
different from anything hitherto shown 
at M.A.C. It consists of 28 lithographs, 
quite large sized, and 4 woodcuts, of very 
striking appearance. These were made by 
Mr. Birger Sandzen, who is a teacher of 
art at Bethany College, Lindsborg, 
Kansas. Mr. Sandzen is of Swedish 
birth and education, but studied also in 
Paris. However, he is largely a self-made 
artist and his work shows very strong 
individuality which cannot be traced to 
any school. Bethany College, where Mr. 
Sandzen works is a famous western in- 
stitution founded and managed by the 
Swedish colony in Kansas, and having a 
wide national reputation, especially for 
its remarkable music. However, Mr. 
Sandzen's art work is also bringing con- 
siderable fame to the same college. 

The exhibition has some local interest 
from the fact that the locality in Kansas, 
largely shown in the pictures, is the one 
where Professor YYaugh and Professor 
Sears spent their boyhood, and the 
scenes are naturally familiar to them. The 
publisher of these pictures, Mr. Carl J. 
Smalley, through whose kindness they 
are loaned, carries on his work in Mc- 
Pherson. Kansas, which is Professor 
Waugh's old home town, the town of 
Lindsborg also being in the same county. 



Totals 7 3 IT Total- 4 6 14 

Referee — J. IsSOt. Time— S-minute quarters 



CvMPIS CALENDAR 



./>' -itrrUlly, hr not uorlilly wiu.' 



Wednesday 

I ill J, i:i. V.ir-ity BSstaCbsfi: Tuft.. 
Thursday - 

Junior Varsity lia-ketti.cll: SprinidirUI 
V.M.I A 

Vanity Debate: Colby. 

7 l"i p. m. In'tex Mc-e-ting. 
Friday - 
4..W B. m Collegian Meeting ■- Kilitorial 

Board. 
7 OO p. m. Social t'nion: Mri-fr^inKers. 
Sophomore ( lass Smoker, Social I'nion 
Room. 
Sunday 
9.10 a. m. Sunday Chapel: Dr. D. Brewer 
Fd-ly, Boston, Mast. 
Monday- Friday 

Winter Term Final Examinations. 



With the winning of the final game last 
Monday night by the Phi Sigma Kappa 
fraternity, the Interfraternity basketball 
series was brought to a sin < esslul close. 
The Phi Sig quintet bee! the team from 
the Alpha (.annua Kho fraternity 18-17, 
in a closely fought game. Thompson 
teal tired the game for the winning com- 
bination while Moriarty was high scorer 
for the losers. 

This contest was unusual in that both 
teams played a game wholly different 
from that which they have beta playing 
thus far. It was a strictly man-to-man 
combat with neither team showing any 
BMpSrhw work, either offensively or de- 
lensively. Both teams were evenly 
matched as some of the best players in 
the league belong to the two clubs. The 
game, as a result of this, was fast and 
flashy. 

During the last week three games were 
fought with the following results: Sigma 
Phi Kpsilon beat the A.T.Ci. team, Alpha 
(iamma Rho beat Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
and Phi Sigma Kappa won over Theta 
Chi. This made the final game between 
Phi Sigma Kappa and Alpha f .anuria Rho, 
which took place as told above. 

The secret of the Phi Sigma Kappa's 
good playing in the series lies in their 
team work. The quintet has played to- 
gether extremely well and although there 
have been no outstanding high scorers, 
the results show that there has been 
pe r fe ct co-ordination. Robertson gained 
the largest numln-r of (mints. 



"Kid" (.on-'-. 1897 basket lull cpiintet 
made- history on the night of Match .'trd 

when they r eco ve red froca ■ slump and 
conquered Vermont, stale champions tad 

etsiwhile claimants ol the New Knglanel 

championship, by ■ SO to 17 count. The 
Agates exhibited good beldam fc, good 

condition, and good shooting, time 

nthUs for a court victory, It was the 

Catamounts' only home defeat of the 

season. The following story of ihe gams 
taken from the Hurhut^ion /-,<-,• Spttik ami 

linns give-, an cv client description of 

the c on t est 

"Ups etting the- dope and presenting 
one ol the ln-st quintets seen in action 
here today, the Massachusetts Aggies 

defeated Vermont on tin- I'.V.M. sartaea 

by a 10-17 tally. The- visiting hoopuien 
wen- rangy and fa-t wilh a . i.n k si v Ie ol 
play and an entirely new wrinkle, f >n 
the defense three men plavc-d bat k, eve-n 
at the tap oil whafl cine lorw.ud would 
play a |>osition U-twc-en the two back, 
giving a three man line- across the- tloor 
that was neaily impre-gnable while on 
the- offensive the- Ke-d clad quintet would 
pass the ball around in the back court as 
though stalling lor time- until one- player 
would suddenly get free and race- for the 
basket with the ball. They resorted to a 
few long shots at different session but 
ncailv all their |M)ints c anie from step 
shots afte-r this slow but pretty style of 
play had c«|Mnec| the- Catamount de- 
fensive. The Aggie quintet plavc-d a 
great game- de-spite the- fact the v had U-en 
trimmed in the previous night's play ami 
were- necessarily tired from their long trip. 
The- tats showed signs of stalen«-ss and 
it is little wonder considering the tough 
SChedufa they have been through tin- past 
few weeks. 

Marvin tapfeed the- ball into his own 
territory the first play of the game ami 
Piice- anel Prentice missed successive tries 
at the basket before the striped net men 
got their hands on the ball and started 
in their stalling offensive. Thomas made 
a sudden dash to the- sidelines but instead 
of shooting snap|H-fl a short pass in to 
(•Continued on Page ]) 



Middlebury Wins 
Close Contest 



Aggie Quintet Fails to Hold 
Half- lime Advantage. 



First Frosh Smoker 

Proves Big Success 

Program of .Entertainment 
Meets Popular Approval. 



Ihe Irishmen held their initial smoker 

in the Sex ial Union room on Friday night, 
March 4, at which the class m e mb e r s, 
with the help of some upper -classmen, 

put on i program that met with popular 

approval. 

P r of ess or Marshall (). I.amphe.ir, the 
faculty Speaker of the evening, gave- some 

enlightening suggestions for the benefit 
of the dam, with special reference to the 

future. His talk, illustrated by interest- 
ing stories, was e-njoye-fl by all. The 
remainder of the program consisted of 

selections l»> David C. Bradford '28 as 

"Lady latima", readings by William l.. 
C.rant ".i<> anel Demetrius I., t.alanie 'U7, 
anel two wrestling matches. Pipes and 
tobacco, and cigarettes we-re ps 
around tej all, while ice-cream and cake- 
const it uteri the ref reshtnent part of the 
program. 

The committee in charge included 
( .eorgc If. Harney, Raymond S. Mann, 
and Paul T. Phinney. 



The Middlebury Panthers outplayed 
the Agates on the Middlebury floor on 
March 2nd and won by a score of 23 to 
17. The Agates were ahead, II to 9, at 
half time, but Sorenson, left forward on 
the Genoa Mountain team, dropped 
several long shots through the net at the 
resumption of hostilities, ami the Middle- 
bury team was nivir subsecpiently in 
danger. 

"Hlonelie" Thomas gave- M.A.C. its 
first two |foints, and Captain Parte-n- 
heimer contributed f'JUr more- on a long 
throw anel an Under- the basket attempt. 
The Opposing players also kept adding 

counters, Franaoni, Sore-ns«m, Palmer, 

anel Hasseltine garnering f>ne- double- 
dee ker apiece. "Ray" (.rilhn placed 
Aggie at the front with two tallies just 

before the gun sounded half-time, 
A fusilade e>f long shots ov erwhe lmed 

the- Agates in the- ne-xt session, anel no 
M.A.C. scores win- forthcoming for 
some- time. With Middlebury far eheed, 
"Ray" 'irimn anel "Squash" McEwan 

reduced the inaigiri somewhat by con- 
tributing the only Aggie Hoor goals of 

that period. 
Numerous shots failed to penetrate the 

hoop, anel the foul shooting wis rather 

mediocre. Sorensae end Prensoni starred 
in Middlebury '■ last game <>( the season. 
Tin- score; 



Mm. i 


lg 


lie 






Mlclellebury 








It 


F. 


P. 


B. P. 


P. 


Kane. If 







g 





Frasonl. rf 3 1 


a 


Ree<l, If 




1 


1 


1 


Sorenson, If .'> 1 


n 


Griffin, rf 




1 


1 


7 


Saldutti o i) 





Thomas, c 




1 





2 


Palmer tk 10 


•i 


McEwen, lg 




1 


■ 


2 


It. Heine, In 1 


•j 


Part'heimer, 


rn 


1 


1 


ft 







Totals 



7 3 17 



If.ticl- 



in :» £J 



Refereje: — Obrien .,1 Ruil.tiul. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1927 



Til MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Puplished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

William L. Dole 27 Editor-in-Chief 



B-LSWOBtH Baknakd '28 



Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial William L. Dol* 

Athletic* Hakolii E. Clakk 

W. Gori>on Hunter 

11. .WARD \V. HlNIER 

C.mpui New. Ernest L. Spencer 

John B. Howard Jr. 
Eric Singleton 
Faculty k Short Course* Edward H.Nichols 
Intercollegiate Kdltor Josephine Paniica 

Peraonal* Editor Frances C. Brick 



•27 

•2H 
•29 
•30 

•2s 
•30 

:«) 

•29 

•27 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
(i-,- M ■ Clac.g '27 Business Manager 

lIw's H WH.TAEER '27 Advertising Manager 
JciTn E "White -27 Circulation Manager 

DOl'GLAS W. LORING "28 

Edwin A. Wilder 28 

Harold K. Ansell 29 

Lawrence A. Carruth 29 

William A. Egan 29 

Frederick D. Thayer. Jr. &> 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

We have just returned from .i brief 
\isii .it the Amherst town fting We 
noted that there were many Amherst 
CoilegB students in the balcony and that 
the AfJBJKi men were noticeable by their 
ahseiue. This may or may not be Munih- 
< ant . Think it ovt i 

* * • 

From how many finals are you excused 
'the ri^ht way"? 

* * « 

The fact that the baseball team st.ut- 
practice this week shoulil please- many. 

* * * 

We note with interest that we have 
drawn our faculty from all over the 
United States and from several other 
parts of the world. The New Knslanders 
and the delegation from the middle west 
have the largest enrollment but t he- 
others are making their influence felt. 
This is another good thing to know 
when we are spreading propaganda for 
our Alma Mater. 



PERSONALS 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. MARCH 9. 1927 



WITH THE ALUMNI 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cent.. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



E««*r«d at aecond-ckss matter at the Amherst 
PoTtffi Accepted for mailing at »pec.al rate 
Stt^pr^sSdfor in action ,1103 Act of Oc- 
taber. 1917. authorized August 20. 1918- 



PASSING THE TORCH 

•AH things must come to an end. We 
are now on the threshold of turning over 
our privilege of imposing our ideas on 
our readers to another. We wish to pave 
the way a bit for our successor. Rwt, 
let us say that the Editor-in-chief of the 
Collegian is nothing more nor km than 
the megaphone of the entire editorial 
staff of the paper. On the other hand, 
we have tried to be ju-t that and we 
believe that the future will find none who 
con* iou-ly set out to be otherwise. The 
Collegian does not set out to voice the 
opinion of the entire student body, Bute" 
the student body hap.xns to be of one 
opinion. Neither data the Collegian pro- 
pose to express the ideas <>f the majority, 
but merely the kteas of the CsUtfisa. 
Therefore, you will help ywaadves and 
the Collegian by presenting your own id. BJ 
in the form of communications whenever 
your views differ from those expressed in 
these comma*. 

If any feature of tin- paper set bm 
lacking in some essential quality, and we 
,,r- certain that several features of the 
paper ran U Thus CI Kit b ed, do not rant 
about it in some obscure corner, in fact, 
lib- will be much more pleasant for the 
members of the Cotfrfia* staff, if you make 
yourselves on ful .>- well as obnoxious and 
Mil. mit constructive criticism. It is hard 
for ,i!i> one man or any imali group d 

p, ,,;,;, ..nit-, and if trM } 

hear nothing but destructive criticism 
the} ma) : ■'" h remarks 

and therefori fail to • ''>'• 

'Ih. I der*. "W. 

aim to i '• lb lp "-• 



SPRING FEVER 

like to ■ term of Indus- 

try and the Term of Indolence Appli- 
cation t< 

with the winter season and play to 
ring, rhere i- con- 
ed in these <>! «s an 
merit for more winter -port-, at MA 1 
but that is in. ktental al this tii 
point that we wish to present no 
the negative side of the same qui 
applied to -[.ring. The usual spring 
contains much outdoor recreation, i 



. We 

n will Ik 



nothing at all, 

fee! sure that the i om i 

no exception. 

nderst 
not decrying outdoor r» 

Ottfielve* all tbe -.pnti. 

spring exert be thai 

with. We also oi 

cottege we < .in . | wi 

j-, usually almo ucn 

the --pring as in the other two-thirds of 

the college year. We reaHae thai our 

own house is largely glass but we wish 
to throw out this idea nevertheless, 
hoping that somewhere it may find 
fertile ground. Spend a few more of 

those hours of lassitude in studying next 

spring and fewer of the opportunities 

at M A < will die unused. 



Wi are 
VVe owe 

d all 
away 

. ail the 

Hid there 
a liable in 



AGATES TRIM VERMONT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
McEwen who dropped in a side shot. At 
the tap-off the ball was sent into Aggie 
territory but Price recovered and passed 
to Prentice near the center of the court 
where the lanky forward dropped one in 
to tie the count. On the next play Prentice 
attempted a shot but Kane interfered 
and knocked the ball out of bounds. 
Marvin passed the ball to Price who was 
uncovered and the blond back sent 
Vermont into the lead with a step shot, 
t.rirhn missed a proffered free try when 
fouled by Moody but Thomas retrieved 
the ball and tapped it in to tie the score. 
Thomas and Prentice missed successive 
tries from the foul line and then Price, 
getting the ball at the side of the court, 
dropped in a long one. The Aggies called 
time out. At the resumption of play, 
Price took a pass from Prentice and 
dropped in another long one to give 
Vermont an 8-4 lead. Partenheimer was 
fouled by Moody and sank a free try but 
Thomas missed when fouled by Price. 
Post was fouled by Thomas and shot 
Vermont's only ace of the game. Thomas 
heaved a long one which missed by inches 
but the big center caught it on the re- 
Wnind and sank a side shot. Moody 
came through with a spectacular side 
shot on a regular signal play, one of the 
prettiest pices of teamwork in the contest. 
C.rifhn gr ab bed the ball from a melee and 
(kibbled in for a step shot. Recti made 
! on two proffered free tries, when 
fouled by Price, to tit- th.- snarl at 11 all. 
(aptain Marvin called time out for 
Vermont. Right at the start of play the 
\isitors got a hold of the hall again and 
Started their old stalling offensive with 
< .rifnn finally making a diffii tilt shot over 

Price's head just before the half ended 

13-] 1 in favor of the Aggke, 

Vermont got away to a frying start t< 
th.- second half. Muddy shot .1 pass t. 

Post n.ar the trie throw line and the littl. 
flash in his last try f..r Vermont dropped 
in .1 beauty. P re n t i ce dodged by ftuti n- 

hcimer, made a pretty feint and dribbk 

into .1 -id. shot to give the Green and 
(,.,!. I .1 short livid had 15-13. Thoi 

took a pas- from t.rittm and i.e.- lor 

.[!< to drop in and ti. 

tin- count at 1") all. i.riinn footed by, 
Prentice, missed on a free try. Reed 

anxious and foul, d Pi h right und< t 
the netting but Vermont's stellar back 

■ .1 mi a free try. Reed got over a 
pretty pla\ with the Aggjes back in their 
Jd Stalling Kami'. Reed raced Price d 
the BOOT and then shot a. ror.- tin floor to 

i.- \e ... wild pas. by Thomas and -.ink 
an overhand spectacular heave which 
a^ain gave the Aggie* the lead 17-16. 

Ibr. Vermont fans began to go frantic 

a- tli. visitors with a two-point lead h 
around in tin backcoUfl and played with 
the ball while the Green and '.old tried 
to break up their stalling and par 

with little result. Marvin called time out 

for Vermont. Price was fouled by M< 

en and missed the try. Reed t Inn 

aUo missed a bran- of proffered points 

when fouled by Mood>. Prim tool: a 

from Post Beat the free try line and 

sank a basket to tie tin score white th<- 
( ataniount fans shrieked Utah joy to the 

roof. That was the end, though, as tar 

as the f.reen and '.old were ron< end. 

Marvin committed s technical foul on the 
tap-off .Hid Griffin coolly collected tne 

point, Vermont again 'ailed lor time. 

I line minutes to go and trailing by a 

single point, it looked as if the- ( atS had 
plenty of time to pull the game from the 
fire Price missed a tough shot which 
looked perfect only to ilice off the rim 



Spring is coming and several are already 
alleited by the seasonal fever. Tom 
l.awlor went to classes the other (lay 
with his leggings on the wrong legs, and 
Mort Cleveland so forgot himself that he 
wore a freshman cap with his uniform. 

P 

Kddie Nichols tried a futuristic style 
and unwittingly went to supper in one 
brown and one black shoe. 

P 

And the pins are falling! Leonard 
Thomson, hitherto known as the "woman 
hater", after spending a week end in 
(.reenfield, lost his fraternity pin. Con- 
gratulations, Tompy. 

P 

Ray Mann gave an aesthetic dancing 
exhibition last Sunday evening in front 
of the Sig Kp house. He was appropri- 
ately clad in "evening dress". 

P^— 

Brud Brockway and Dutch Barnard 
kept up their bridge record when they 
won a challenged bridge game at the 
infirmary by a score of 204() to 936. 
P 



FACULTY NOTES 



'11 Henry B. Morse is connected with 
the Portsmouth Dye and Chemical Co. 
of Portsmouth, N. H. 

'JJ Stuart I). Sansson is Deputy Cit\ 
Clerk of Hermosa Beach, Calif. 

'86 Dr. W'infield Ayres is a physician 
in New York City with offices on Madison 
Avenue. 

w'U5 Charles Sylres is a trainman on 
the Saa Diego Klectric Railway Company 
in California. 

'03 Edward B. Snell is a civil engineer 
in New York City. 

X<> Charles W. Clapp is a civil en- 
gineer of the Rapid Transit Railway Co. 
in Tampa, Florida. 

'25 Kmil Corwin has withdrawn from 
Woronoco to accept a position with the 
Griffith-Stillings Co. of Boston, an adver- 
tising concern. 

'08 J. A. Hyslop has been elected to 
serve as president of the Entomological 
Society of Washington for the year 1927. 

'22 Victor N, Cluff has recently 
married Anna M. Thompson of Worcester. 



l.ast Sunday Prof. Fred C. Sears, Prs> 
lessor of Pomology and Head of th. 
Department, left for Michigan State 
College to complete the exchange of 
professors lietween that college and this 



West side windows were at a premium 
at the Abbey last Sunday night during 
the Hadley fire, and a chance passerby 
would have entertained no doubt in his 
mind that he was in the presence of a 
co-ed hangout. 



CLASS NOTES 

At a meeting of the Senior class but 
Wednesday, William ('.. Amstein of South 
Deerfield was elected to the latcr-daa 
Athletic Board. 

The class of '29 held their regular 
meeting at this time, at which Harold K. 
Ansell, urged as many as possible to tr\ 
out for the position of cheer leader. 

At a meeting of the freshmen held at 
the same time, it was decided to post|xui, 
the entertainment and dance to be given 
by the class members, from March 11 to 
some date to be decided next term. 
Postponement was necessary on account 
of the pressure of academic work at thi, 
time, and because the original date con- 
flicted with Social Union. 



MILITARY NOTES 



i 



TRACK MEN WIN 

(Continued from Pafts » 
Friend '23, whose time was 4 minutes, 
50 4-5 seconds. 

In the 1000-yard run, Schappelle of 
M.A.C. and Svenson of Worcester Acad- 
emy ran neck and neck nearly all the way. 
Both runners alternated during the race, 
and despite a spurt by Schappelle, 
Svenson won by a small margin. The 
time of the race was 2:31 3-5. 

Two Aggie men were in the final heat 
of the 300-yard run. Captain Hall won 
the first trial heat, and John Kay secured 
third in the same heat. In the final 
Captain Hall got a bad start because of 
a mixup with the fast Jackson Sholz at 
the first turn. As a result, he was unable 
to place more than third. John Kay 
came in fourth. Time, 38 seconds. 

Nottebaert '-7 won second place in the 
s]K<ial 880, which was a handicap race, 
in a time which came as a surprise to the 
spectators. Although it seemed that he 
had almost no chance against ( ieorge 
l.eness of New York, he got a good start 
and secured second place. The rest of 
the runners were left (mite a long dis- 
tance in the rear. 

Mahoney, the only M.A.C. man not 
to place, nevertheless ran some good races. 

On the whole, the M.A.C. team did re- 
nin. .rkably well, considering that they 
wen- running against world famous men. 

MAC, was scheduled to run a relay 

with Springfield College, but owing 
to the ineligibility of two of their men, 
this raee was postponed. 



The results of the First Corp Area 
match were received last week by the 
Military Department. The Mass. Aggie 
team took sixth place out of the eleven 
teams competing. The score was 7273 
out of a possible 8000. The match was 
won by the Norwich team, with a score 
of 7823. The Rhode Island State College 
took second place. Incidentally, it may 
be said that Norwich and Rhode Island 
have the best teams in the history of 
college shooting. 



FLORICULTURE CLUB MEETING 

The Floriculture Club held its final 
meeting of the winter term last Thursday 
evening in French Hall, at which time 
Mr. Butler, of the Butler & Ullman Co. of 
Northampton, gave an informal talk to 
the members of the Club. Mr. Butler 
reviewed in detail the accounting system 
which he uses and traced the different 
steps through which each sale goes in 
being recorded. 



Tonight there are to be moving pic- 
tures in Bowker Auditorium, of some of 
the phases of Military Science. The 
purpose of these pictures is to show that 
all the activities of Military Organiza- 
tions are not connected with destruction 
of life and property. 



DEBATING TEAM LOSES TWO 

(Continued from Page 1) 

will have its final opportunity to break 
into the win column when it meets the 
Colby University team here. The ques- 
tion will be a wholly new one, namely 
Resolved, that the United States Ciovern- 
ment should take immediate steps to 
recognize the Soviet government of 
Russia. The home team will uphold the 
affirmative, and a spirited contest is in 
prospect . 



PREXY TO BE CUEST 

Continued from 1'nUe 1) 

Board of Tru lei I of the College 1 i. , 

been in\ ited. 

It i- hoped that the undergraduates, 
who live in the vicinity of boston, will 
.rail themselves of this opportunity to 
rme acquainted with the Gab and 
meet the alumni. Further information 
concerning the program may be bad l>\ 
calling at the Alumni < rrhce. 



and the "t their hands on the ball 

again and proceeded to hold it. < .ritlin 
the ball in a melee near I he (inter 
and rand I'nntire half the length of the 
court, beating him to the net l>\ a margin 
of inches and sinking a twin counter. 
Griffin got ahold of Marvin's tap and 
started another rare for the net, hut 

Prentice forestalled him. Referee Swa- 

llield railed a foul on Bunny but Griffin 

failed to colled and then the Agates got 

ahold of the ball and kept it in their 
possession for the majority of the remain- 
ing seconds of play although Vermont got 
in a few wild heaves which did little 
damage. Thomas and Griffin starred for 
tin- Aggies with no individual performer 
for the locals." 

The line up and summary: 



EXPECT VICTORY 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the Middlebury Panthers mauled the 
Agates, but the Aggie warriors wreaked 
vengeance on the Vermont Catamounts, 
and are now out to down the Jumbos. 

Two regular players will participate in 
their last hoop contest for the Maroon 
and White, Captain Merril H. Partem 
heimer of (ireenfield and Raymond C 
(.riftin of Southwick, while Thomas J. 
Kane of Westfield, another senior on the 
squad, may also sec service. 

(aptain Partenheimer has In-cn a 
regular pl.ner for three seasons, and has 
already bean named twice on Spalding's 
All New bngland basketball team. He is 
one of the three hading sroieis DO I he 
Aggie quintet this year. 

"Ray" Griffin is also one of the lead- 
ing point getter-, and has distinguished 
himself for two years by his good shoot- 
ing and his exceptional Speed. He is a 
logical contender for a position on any 

All Ni w England team. 

The type of pby pursued it M.A.t . 
this year has aaesssitsti <l gaud t< am work. 

and both of these play'efs, although of 
outstanding abilit\, have s.inili. -<l pel 

simal advancement to co-operation. Re- 
sult: a successful season mcludis 

out of twelve victories to date, ilespiie 
tne loss ot three All-New England players 
from the raster last June when Jones, 
Temple, and Sniih y were graduated. 

A victory this afternoon will keep the 
home slate el. an, for no team has tri- 
umphed over the Agates on the Drill 
Hall floor this year. Tufts has bun 
defeated by Aggie basketball teams at 
least once every -.ease q for the la-i >e\< n 
-■ a-ons.andthe n cord should be extended. 



GRADUATE SEMINARS 
The Graduate Seminars, which Started 
February 28, and which have been held 
every Wednesday during Assembly p 
have licen well attended by both graduate 
and faculty. At the Seminar held 
week, l'rof. Newlin of Amherst College 
si>oke on the subject of a Liberal l.'luca- 
tion. This talk was very interesting. The 
meeting this week will Ik- given over to I 
disrussion of the talk of last week. ThW 

have been 4t) to SO present at these nun 

ings t tuts far. and rati rest is growing esd 
week. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW I'RICES .,„ 

Men? Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - • »f» 
Mens Half Sole*. Rubber He«lf - - - «•» 
Mens Rubber SoIm. Rubber HeeU - - '■* 

Men's Half Soles l " 

Work Guaranteed— Corner of Pleasant and 
Amity Sts. Open till 8 P. M . 




Matt. A little 

I 
K.uir, If O 

Reed, If I 

Griffin, rf ■'• 
Thotm 

■ n. Ik 1 

part heimer, 1 8 " 



!• P 



Vermont 

l< 



Totalt 
Referee 



1 Ml 



I'li-nti' e, if 
I'., i. rf 
Marvin, i 
Prlet, Ik 
MootHe, ik 



Total* 



I P 


i : 

ii i 

| 
n 



i n 






CIIKKSK EXHIBIT ATTRACTS 

(Continue! frem I'afte I) 

are very enthusiastic about the possibili 
tii s of more extensive use of cheese. Pro 
lessor Frandsen feels that dairy peopk 
so closely located to our large consuming 

(inters have a wonderful Opportunity lor 

the development of the soft cheese indus- 
try. This will not only open a in.iiket for 
by products now ronsidered of little 

importance, but should add very materi 

ally to the revenue of I he dairy farmer 
as most of these fanes cheeses sell at a 
high price. I le also feels that the develop 
incut of these by products will have a 
value in taking care of the surplus of milk 
thai may develop in the SOI distant 
fill lire. 



You Want 
to Get Ahead 

The Life Income Plan •£ 
make your efforts count by 
" helping you save regularly. 

It will put you $15,000 to the 
good by age 55, or guarantee 
you a life income then. Mean- 
while it will protect y°" r 
family with $10,000 life insur- 
ance, and pay you $100 a 
month whenever disabled. 

Look into it now for you' 1 
want it some day. For book- 
let. 'Pension Yourself", write. 

Connecticut General 
Life InsuranceCompa"? 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield l^ 3 

Greenfield, Mess. 



"All that has been said about twenty-five cent cigars has been said about a five cent one." Likewise Suits. We despair in describing IIICKKY-KRKR- 
MAN suits here. Why not give us an opportunity to show you how superior Mickey- Freeman are to their competitors. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College 1 earns and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



Two-Y 


ear Final 






Exam. Schedule 


March 14, 15, 16, 1927 




Monday. March 14. TH T.U a. 


in 


B*f SL' 


CM A Hon Mfp BI 


Kl. M 


An llus M 


.lid I'onit m 


AV> 


D.iity S.'f 


PL o 

Monday, III- 12 a. m. 




II.. II BJ 


I'll C I'om SJ 


1 1 1 ■ 


Micro si 


m M Bag. BJ 

Monday, 2-4 p. in 


t II A 


An lag s7 


ItS, 111 Toult SJ 


110 


An llii- SJ 


IS l'om S7 


III 1' 


HSBM K< n 


111 Rur So, SI 


t H \ 


Tueaday. March IS. 7.SO-».S0 a. 


m 


Hu> law SI 


i ii i) Hem i". si 


31J 


II.. mi- Bi B] 


BU l'om SI 


\\ H B 


An Hus S7 


1 uf.il.1 \. 10-12 a. n>. 




llort SI 


mi Moii - 1 


KM ( 


Motors S2 


12 lloit So 


ill II 


V«| l ianl SL' 


KM D I'oult BI 


no 


Farm Mut SI 


MM 

Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 




An Knu SI 


BM An Mus S6 


12 


Ag Knit M 


111 Mort SH 


KM K 


Kk Be si 


11.1.114 VegC.anlsl 


Ml D 


Wednesday. March lb. 7.SO-9.S0 a 


. m. 


Korentry SI 


KM M Mort Si 


KM P 



attempted, .m<l ooasequentl) srers srorth) 
ul rccognitioa. The following will receive 

tluir class ntiinciaU: Adams, BartSCA, 

Bond, < <«\, l\lt, Pillsbury, Warren, 
Zuger, .iml Rile) (maaager). 



Spring: - - Spring: 

Our Spring Bostonians are beginning 
to arrive. Step in and look them over. 
They are better than ever. 

$7.50 to $10.00 

B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



NUMERAL AWARDS 

The Interclass Athletic Board voted to 
award numerals to the I'rtshnian hockey 
players at a recent meeting, but decide d 
to with-holo numerals for interclass 
basketball and interclass hockey. The 
basketball series ended in a tie IkUsiiii 
the Juniors and the Sophomores, while 
only four game of the hockey series could 
Ik.- played, so the committee felt justified 
in not awarding numerals in either case. 

The Freshman hockey team completed 
a more ambitious »■ ludiili- than is usually 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

1 PLEASANT STREET, (up om llakt) 

OculUta Prescriptions fitted. Broke* l«oa*> 
accurately replaced 

BIC; BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makee 

Attractive Gifts 
in 

BRASS, LINENS, ETC 

at 
$ 1 .00 and less. 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



MODKl.s ON DISPLAY 

The two models lor a memorial to 

commemorate the s erv ic es si President 
ButterSeld to Use College, which are Iks 
result of a competition b et wee s groups 
of students in Laadscspe Gardeemg 80, 
conducted under the supervision <>i Prof. 
I i. ink A. Waugh, save be ta placed on 
display in the Memorial Building for ■ 

lew weeks 

Tor the comp et ition the class was 

divided into two groups ol ten members 
each, The models were rendered as one 

oi the regular daily class esercises, The 

area directly in front of Btoc h bfidge Hall 
was designated as the site ol the memoi ial. 



Town Hall, Amherst 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

Last Thursday night a dinner was held 
in honor of Exchange l'rof. Victor (iard- 
nei ul Michigan, who is to be at M.A.C. 
for a short while. This dinner was given 
by the Division of Horticulture, l'rof. 
Frank A. Waugh, Head of the Division, 
was toast master. Among those present 
were l'rof. Ray M. Koon, Head of the 
Market < .anlen Held Station at Wal- 
tham, and l'rof. Victor A. Tiedjens, also 
of the Field Station. 



The Ex|»erimenl Station now has in 
piess a bulletin descriptive of the results 
set tired from the use of different |>otash 
salts as fertilizers. Some of thi* research 
work k<*'s bach •"(•"> \e,us and was initiated 
by the late Dr. ( . A. (ioessmann, and 
former Dim toi William P. BfOOhs, The 

bulletin will be ready for distribution 

about the middle of March. 



You will And an eicellant 

. . . snoi kkpaikim; shop ... 

equipped with the moat up-to-date l.oodjroar 
Machinery and a modern 

■ ■Ol ■■INI NO PARI OK 
at IM Anilty-St.. • Opp. New Theatre 

II V undtrtlanii y«wr re/uirtmcHts anil art pre- 
pared U> meet your nrtd\ 
All work nunrantttd. Shots ihintd and dyti. BO, 
VIMJKNT t.KANKONM.O. Prop. 



INGERSOLL 

The Ford of the Watch World 

Robert C. Ames 

46 I' lea sa nt St. 
Cor. Ilallock 



JEWELER 
Tel. 451-R 



Wed. 
Ilium. 

M | I INKK 

MB, 

HnW -A I 

snail 
7.10 



Friday 

.ISO 

Ma, s.js 



Saturday 
J J* 

Mi « io 



Pontile Hill li.Mil.lr Hill 

I .mi j I BfSjMMa ,,nd J. hum 
Klrk»i»Hl In lit I IKK 

lilts IN I III K UN." 

I'r.ipiMsl KHiiproniliMN] 
by a in. m »he i hough i a dear 
frlnul It wae all a part of 
i he muni a- inn ml I, 'it black- 
mail *i Ih-iim", cw r i in limit- 
On! either idle ,,l the Atlan- 
tic And Hurry I nnHdoii In 
bl» lirtl feature lenttih • uni- 
edy, "TRAMP, TRAMP. 
TRAMP." II luiifthe were 
Horlh a dollar It would coal 
\mi a in 1 1 linn t<mee "Trump- 
I r.,ni|i I ramp " Interna- 
I lima I New* and P.thlea. 
KM. II AH PKHaV.H 



Norma .Shearer and Cm- 
rad Naftel In "THE WANING 
SKX." You never u* Nor- 
ma Shearer more charm I lift, 
mure brilliantly «h,,v» lnii her 
iin.i/li,i> talenu then an the 
lieniity who fouftht with 
modern weaponi to bold her 
man. SportllUht and 

BoMMtl Comedy. "Should 
Sleepwulkem Mtirry." 



Kenneth Marian and Viola 
liana la "TUB ICB FLOOD" 

the terrific cllmaa of thU 
Ureal drama of adventure 
and romance amid the paa- 
•lone of the froten north. 
News and Comedy 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TAI.K8 

Reduced prices on most all lines this 

month. 
Sporting Goods, Records, and others. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



DRURY'S BAKERY 

— AT— 

120 Pleasant Street 

is open for the seaaon of '26 
and »27. 



Order EATS for parties, 
receptions and hikes. 



W. B. DRURY 

120 Pleasant St., 

I* irsi house south "f campy. 

Telephone 511 



OUR NEW SPRING SUITS are here and for your approval. Would like to see you all and show them to you, 
Also New Topcoats and more coming. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 

New Location, Opposite Town Hall 



"Ask Me Another 



«• 



The latest craze: 40 information tests 

Ray Stannard Baker rated °4 

Three average citizens made scores of 

52, 68 and 78. What do you rate? 



SAMPLE 01 rSTIONS 

What ■ ni ' 

\\ bo <li.il orcred i In- X-B 

Wlr •■ in ili'- Bible? 

Who paid "What thb country need* 

mod i- ■ good ii' ■ t '.' 

What I* John L> Rocfeefeller'i niddl*. 

n.i.' 
Who laid "I ewrald ratbei be riuht 

than • "t "•' 



To Get the Best, Buy 

"Ml -NSINCVVI AR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers Step-Ins Vesta 

Combinations 



SOLI) KXCI i BiVELl BY 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

At the Service of those who appreciate 
Better Shoe Repairing 



192 7 

M.A.C. STATIONERY HAMPSHIRE VELLUM, 49c 

A. J. HASTINGS 

\'< wsdealer and Stationer 



Watch for our Specials on all Shoes and Men's furnishings on Dollar Day-Saturday, Mch. 5 

GINSBURG'S, 19 Pleasant Street 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



AMHERST. MASS. 



The Beat in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Tk» 5 te*aJbL Storm 



SING LEE HANP LAUNDRY I ABSOI.l I H.V NKW M MBKKS 
No. 1 Main St., Am Herat, M**« Another five New N urn her* of < Allege 



Our i.munittf Flret r:iaee 

Our •'•II. y Guaranfewe) 

rrpairino and all kinds of 
wasiiim; done at rbasonahlf. 
PBticsa. 

Oppo*<*C |»,„ r Offirr 



Oxford* that »ati*fy everybody. 

Shoe Repairing l>tw*rtmmt 

JOHN FOTOS 

SM.F-Sr.RVK.r. SHOE CTOi- K 



as the 



Best The Best Known. Next time you buy a shirt insist on a Manhattan, the shirt with the perfect 



Manhattan ShirtS - - K 7nmco\\Z Tot $3.00 there's no shirt made that can compare with it. Sold only hy 

T1YANNIS 



EXETER 



CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 1927 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 



The l'ni\. oi .Minnesota psychology de- 
|)arimini baa discovered through "'per* 
Min.ility tests" thai the men students arc 
not "\soiimi haters" aad thai the women 

are disposed to admire mcinlxrs of the 

opposite six. Wli.it will iluse heretical 

scientists discover next? \\'i c.\|>c( t tliem 
soon to headline the discovery that pretty 
^iils tend to Im-coiuc conscious of their 
beauty and that on the whole I'hi Beta 
Kappa students In-tray unusual mental 
development. — The New Student. 



I )o not inhale. It is injurious to scholar- 
ship. That is the conclusion Dr. J. Kosslyn 
Erp of Antioch Cottage arrives at in his 



Razor Blades — Tooth Brushes — Usterine — Handkerchiefs — Candy 

YE AGGIE INN 



Key Containers — Alarm Clocks 



Shaving Cream Tooth Paste 

RESTAURANT 

— BUT Of BTUDBNT BOARD 

ICK CREAM MILK SHAKES, BTC 

— Tobacco Fountain Pens Fraternity Stationery Massachusetts Seal Stationery Watch Fobs Tobacco Pouches - Bill Folds 



Palmer Day won the Bean Contest by 
guessing 4788; actual count, I7. r >2 



STORE 

—STUDENT SUPPLIES of All Kinds 

U. S. Post Office Service — Chocolates, etc. 



New Amherst Theatre 

M»tinee» daily at 3. Evenings 6:45 and 8: 30 
Today and Thursday 

Harold l.loyd 

in 

"TIIK KID HR Oil IKK" 

PRICKS: Mat. & Kve., - Children. Ilk 

Adulls. etc 
Kvrnlnfts. nil seats, - - 40v 

Friday only 

5 Acts VAl'DKVII.I K S Act* 

Photoplay attraction "OBEY THE LAW" 

PRICKS: Matinee Children, - MC 

Adults, - - Mk 

Evenlnftn, All seats, Mk- 

Saturday only 

Adolphe Menjou In 
•TIIK HEAD WAITKR" 

I'.iilie NeWH Ohrlslie Comedy 

Monday and Tuesday 

Corrinne (.riltiili in 
"8YNOOPATINC St I " 

I'.nln- News l.loyd llumilion Comedy 



Wednesday and Thursday 

A Emm Crey story with Jack Holt 
"MAN OK TIIK FOREST" 
Felix Cartoon "TIIK COLLEGIANS" 
medy 

COMING ATTRACTIONS 
March 2.K. Clara How in "IT" 
March 21 22, "BKN I1UR" 
March .11. "THE BIO PARADE" 



hook, "The Student Who Smokes" baaed 
on a statistical study of the problem. 

These genera] conclusions are drawn from 
his study: 

"The smoker smokes localise it is a 
BOdai bahit. He has low scholarship be- 
( 'a use he is socialile. Scholarship demands 
the exercise of attention which cuts off 
the individual from his fellows. This 
solitude of mind is incompatible with the 

gregarious instinct. 

"The habit of smoking devitalizes am- 
bition. 

"That some poJeM or poisons in the 
smoke acting upon the central nervous 
system produces a deterioration of nervous 
tissue leading directly to a lower mental 
output." — The New Student. 



challenge and l>oth students and alumni 
quickly reaponded. 



Smith College is the only women's 
college to debate Cambridge University 
this year. They debated the unusual 
question chosen by Smith, "Resolved, 
That this House deplores the present 
attitude of Cambridge University towards 
women." 



According to a recent survey at Ohio 
State University, a fraternity man latars 
under a greater financial strain than do 
his unaffiliated schoolmates. A conserva- 
tive estimate places the expenses of a 
frat men at $3 a month above htat of a 
non-frat. 



ton Univerak) by a board consisting of 
regents' commissioners recently appointed 
by Governor Hartley, about 7,000 stu- 
dents went out on strike. After being 
requested by the deposed president to 
refrain from any further demonstration, 
the students promised to return to their 
classes. Dr. Suzzallo's dismissal is being 
Opposed by many alumni and business 
men of the state. 



Members of the Yale Student Council 
must pledge that they are willing to 
enforce the honor system by reporting 
all violations before putting their names 
on the ballot. Laxity of enforcement 
caused the failure of the honor system 
experiment last year. 



The Triangle Club of Princeton Uni- 
versity has donated $100,(00 toward the 
building fund for the new theatre. The 
students are to have a theatre which will 
seat about fifteen hundred, which will be 
utilized exclusively for amusements, and 
student purposes. 



Protesting against the dismissal of Dr. 
Henry Suzzallo as president of Washing- 



Abolishment of compulsory gymnasium 
work at McGiU University has been 
announced. This measure was adopted 
because of lack of suitable quarters to 
hold the classes. The work will be re- 
sumed as soon as facilities are prcpracd 
to handle the students. It is expected 
that there will be no resumption of the 
work this year. 




The New Shoes for 
Spring are here 

Fine Black & Tan Leathers 

$5 to $10 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

Incorporated 
275 High St., Holyoke 



The editor of the Chicago Herald- 
Tribune issued a challenge to the students 
and alumni of Marquette University to 
erect a memorial to Father Marquette, 
S.J. The Marquette Tribune accepted the 



The College Candy Kitchen 

A fine place to go and take your friends for 

LUNCH or DINNER 

Ice Cream, Milk Shakes, Fresh Fruits, Refreshments and Sodaa, 
Salted Nuts. Page & Shaw, Park & Tilford, Boxes Ready 

to be Mailed. 

SMOKES O F ALL K INDS 

ICE CREAM FOR YOUR FRATERNITY AFFAIRS 
Do not Forget that Special SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 
the place for the college man" 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 




[Upper classmen in smoke-shop, buying Camels] 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Top in quality— first in popularity 



EXPERIENCED smokers have proved it. 
Discriminating tobacco lovers by the 
million rediscover it each day and every 
evening as the friendly Camels are 
lighted. There simply is no better ciga- 
rette made. The choicest Turkish and 
Domestic tobaccos grown are bought for 
Camels — and such blending for taste 
and fragrance! Only the largest to- 
bacco organization in the world could 
produce a cigarette like Camel. 

In terms of popularity, Camel quality 
has reflected itself in the greatest pref- 
erence ever given a cigarette. There 



never was a tobacco word so famous, 
or a cigarette so good. First in popu- 
larity, because the best — that is the story 
of Camel, the biggest cigarette success 
ever known. 

If you want such smoking enjoyment 
as you never hoped to find, just try 
Camels. Smooth, fragrant and mellowy 
mild, from the first touch of the flame 
to the final puff, Camel will mean a 
revelation to you of tobacco goodness. 
For pleasure unalloyed, for the best 
that's made regardless of price, "Have 
a Camel!" 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 



©1927 



I 



FOR SERVICE \N1) SATISFACTION- Spring topcoats that embody all the style, tailoring, good looks and long wearing qualities demanded by well groomed 
college men at prices surprisingly moderate. Spring suits in both three and four pieces ranging from $45 to $65. Never before have we shown a more com- 
plete and appealing assortment for men who appreciate clothing that will give real service and lasting satisfaction. 

SOUTHWICK BROS, & GAULT 



OUR FRIGIDA1RE 

KEEPS 

ICE CREAM 

RIGHT 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



M BUILDING 



BY COUNT 

WE CARRY 75 VARIETIES OF CANDY 



COME IN 

AND 

INSPECT 
OUR JEWELRY 



S^g jMaagariittggttfi Gkllematt 



Vol. XXXVII. 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1927 



Num 



21 



Charles E. Marshall 

Dies Very Suddenly 

Had Served College Many Years as Head of Department of 
Microbiology and Director of the Graduate School 



As a fitting tribute to Dr. Charles E. 
Marshall, who passed away very suddenly 
Sunday night, March 20, as a result of 
heart disease, the opening chapel of the 
term was dedicated to his memory. Dr. 
Marshall was Head of the Department 
of Microbiology and Director of the 
(Graduate School, and, as President Lewis 
intimated in his memorial to Dr. Marshall, 
he was essentially the man of science, 
with a poise which manifested itself in 
serenity at all times and under all con- 
ditions. 

Dr. Marshall came to M.A.C. in 1912 
from his position as Scientific and Vice- 
Director of the Experiment Station at 
the Michigan Agricultural College, at 
the request of President Kenyon L. 
Butterfield, to organize and direct the 
(Graduate School here. As a result of 
Dr. Marshall's efficient management and 
his high ideals the Graduate School has 
developed from an ill-organized and 
rather purposeless organization of two or 
three students to a strong department of 
the college with about fifty students at 
the present time. The Graduate School 
is now nationally recognized for its high 
attainments in the field of science. 

Dr. Marshall was born on an Ohio 

farm and trained in district and private 

schools until he was eighteen years old. 

He graduated from the Fredonia State 

(Continued on Page 3) 



AGGIE ALUMNI 
MEET INB0S10N 

President Lewis Guest of Honor 
At Big Banquet 



Those who were at the University Club 
in Boston last Friday evening had the 
privilege of witnessing one of the most 
enthusiastic and successful Alumni Ban- 
quets in many years. The fact that there 
were 221 present is sufficient to give an 
idea of the success of the affair and when 
the thought of that number of Aggie 
alumni, singing Aggie songs and yelling 

Aggie cheers is considered, it is possible 
(Continued on Page 4) 



PHOTOGRAPHS FORM 

NEW ART EXHIBIT 



High School Day 

Coming April 30 

Awards in Essay and Story Contests 
Will Be New Feature 



Saturday, April 30, is the day set 
aside as the Eighteenth Annual High 
School Day of this college, when high 
school students and teachers are invited 
to visit Aggie. This affords an excellent 
opportunity of inspecting the campus and 
buildings, and of becoming acquainted 
with the students and faculty. The pro- 
gram includes the Massachusetts Cham- 
pionship Live Stock Judging Contest, 
and the Interscholastic Fruit Judging 
Contest, which are scheduled to take 
place on April 29 at 1.30 p. m. The 
Interscholastic Championship Poultry 
Judging Contest will be held on Saturday, 
April 30 at 8.15 a. m. 

This year there is an added attraction 
in the form of two contests, one for the 
best essay of 800 to 1000 words on 
either of the following topics, "My Im- 
pressions of M.A.C.", or "My Debt to 
a Great Book", and one for the best 
short story of 1000 to 2000 words. Two 
prizes will be offered in each contest, the 
first being $25 and the second $15. These 
will be awarded at the High School Day 
exercises. 



CAMPUS 4-H CLUB 

IS BEING ORGANIZED 



First Meeting Will Be Held 
Next Tuesday Evening 



The campus 4-H Club of M.A.C. has 
been organized and will hold its first 
nutting next Tuesday evening, April 5 
at 7..30 p. m. in the Memorial Building. 
The purpose of the Club is to keep alive 
'he spirit of service attained through 
club work and to pass it on to others, 
*ad to stimulate friendship among former 
dub members. 

1 he executive committee representing 
the four classes is as follow. s: Ella M. 
Buckler and Robert W. McAllister from 
'he senior class, Phoebe H. Hall and 
W xander C. Hodson from the junior 
class, Taylor M. Mills from the sopho- 
m ore and Miriam J. Loud and George 
w. Noble from the freshman class. At 
'he first meeting officers will be elected 
a "d a definite program will be adopted. 

Any four- year student who has been in 
**H club work as a member or leader is 
eligible to membership and is invited to 
** Present at the first meeting on Tuesday 
evening. A two-year club is also in the 
•ormation and will be announced soon. • 



Unusual Display Is Work of 
Professional Photographers 



A number of remarkable pictorial 
photographs, secured by Professor Frank 
A. Waugh from the Newark Camera 
Club of Newark, N. J., are at the present 
time on exhibition in the Memorial 
Building. These pictures constitute the 
first exhibition of professional pictorial 
photography shown at M.A.C. and will 
be a revelation to those who have not 
understood what the camera artists of 
the country have been working on during 
the past few years. These prints show 
excellent workmanship and many of them 
compare favorably with high-grade etch- 
ings. 

All sorts of scenes are portrayed by 
these photographic prints, but probably 
the most interesting are landscapes, 
domestic scenes and portraits. Among 
the pictures on exhibition is one entitled 
"The Reapers" by J. B. Pardoe, a print 
of beautiful workmanship in a somber 
effect, and represents a typical New 
England harvest scene. Several figures 
are at work in the foreground, while to 
the rear appear woods of which the tops 
of the trees are clearly silhouetted against 
a colorful late-afternoon sky. This re- 
markable photograph reminds one of 
"The Gleaners" and "The Angelus" by 
Milet, and is so exquisitely finished that 
one would easily mistake it for an etching. 

The Newark Camera Club from which 
these photographs were secured is a 
famous organization and includes a num- 
ber of nationally-known artists. The 
prints on exhibition in the Memorial 
Building represent such famous men as 
Mr. Henry Hall, Dr. J. B. Pardoe, Mr. 
William Ramsay, Mr. H. Richardson 
Cremer, Mr. Harold C. Amos, Mr. Louis 
L. Fiend and others. 

It is hoped that many will take ad- 
vantage of the opportunity which this 
display offers to see the great work that 
camera artists of today are doing. This 
exhibition in the Memorial Building will 
well repay a visit. 



Recent Graduate 

of College Dies 

Barbara A Huke '26 Passes Away in 
South Hadley Falls 



Miss Barbara A. Huke, member of the 
class of 1926, passed away last week after 
a brief illness, at her home in South 
Hadley Falls. Since her graduation she 
had been attending the Yak- Graduate 
School, continuing her work in micro 
biology, which she started while here at 
Aggie. Four weeks tafore her death, she 
was forced to leave her work and return 
home. 

At the time of her death she was 
twenty-one years old and lived with her 
mother, Mrs. Mary E. Huke in South 
Hadley Falls. The funeral was held at 
her home at two o'clock last Thursday 
afternoon. Members of the class of '2H 
and of the faculty of MAC. as well as 
many friends attended the funeral ser- 
vices. 



New Collegian Board 

Goes Into Office 



Ernest L. Spencer Will Serve As 
Editor-in-Chief 



With the beginning of a new term the 
Collegian starts off with a changed edi- 
torial BotnL Ernest L. Spencer '28 
heads the editorial board and will Ik- 
assisted by Ellsworth Barnard '2S who 
is serving a* MaaSfjng Editor. For the 
first time in several years the memtars 
of the Collegian l>oard will not be handi- 
capped by lack of money and under the 
efficient leadership of Erm-st Spencer the 
pajMr should show considerable improve 
ment. 

Harold K. Clark '2S will remain a> (In 
head of the athletic department and will 
be assisted by Charles S. Cleaves '29 and 
John B. Howard Jr. '.*}(). The campus 
department is headed by Filward H. 
Nichols '29 and he has as his assistants 
Carl A. Bergan '30 and Erie Singleton 
'30. Charles E. Yerner '2 ( .» heads the 
Faculty and Short -Course department and 
Josephine Panzica '2H will take charge of 
the alumni news. 

Coincident with the changes in the 
editorial board of the Collegian a revision 
of the business department has also 
taken place. Edwin E. Wilder '28 was 
elected Business Manager, Harold K. 
Ansell '28 is to fill the position of Adver- 
tising Manager, and Douglas W. I.oring 
'28 will serve as Circulation Manager. 
Laurence A. Carruth '29 and William A. 
Egan '29 will assist in the various depart- 
ments. The competition for new fresh- 
man meml>ers of the business department 
will begin in a few days. 



Aggie Quintet Picks 

All-Opponent Team 

Vermont and Williams Men Given 
Four First-Team Positions 



Mass. Aggie's basketball team, not to 
be outdone by other fives, picked an all- 
opponent basketball quintet at the close 
of the season last term. Vermont and 

(Continued on Pate 2) 



Spring Football 

Starts at Once 



Candidates for Neit Year s Team 
Eipected to Report 



Spring football practice will open at 
once this term. Uniforms will be issued 
during the first week, probably on Tues- 
day and practice sessions will be held on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays until the ad- 
vent of hot weather. All aspirants for 
varsity berths next fall are expected to 
report to Coach (k>re. 

The training secured during the spring 
term has proven very helpful during the 
past few years, and with the 1927 football 
season starting a week earlier than usual, 
spring practice has an added significance 
this year. Several positions in the line 
and backfield will be left vacant by the 
graduation of senior letter-men in June, 
and veterans man be displaced if substi- 
tutes of outstanding ability with a will 
ingness to work can lie found. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"The r ueb of our life is a mingled 
yarn, %ood and had together." 

—Shakespeare (All's Well) 



Thursday — 

7M0 Interfraternity Conference 
meeting. 
Friday— 

8.00 Friday Night Dance. 
Sunday— 

9.10 Sunday Chapel, Mr. Joseph H. 
Twirhell of Williams College, 
Williamstown, .Mass. 
Tuesday— 

7.00 Literary Club Meeting. 

7.30 Campus 4-H Club meeting in 

Memorial Building. 
Girl's dlee Club Concert at the 
Congregational Church, Amherst. 



Quintet Ends Season 

With Win Over 7 fifts 



n 



n 



31-23 Victory Brings Season Record to Eight V 
and Five Losses 



BASEBALL MEN 
RETURN EARLY 



Twenty Candidates Report at 
Practice in Amherst Cage 



Twenty candidates for the 1927 base- 
ball nine returned to Amherst several 
days in advance of the opening of the 
spring term and reported to Coach "Red" 
Ball for the earliest preseason practice 
in several years. Profiting by the vacation 
at Amherst Cottage and the generosity of 
the Amherst Athletic Department, the 
Aggie ball-tossers held practice sessions 
in the Amherst cage. Three workouts 
were scheduled on Thursday and Friday, 
including an evening practice. 

PrOSpSCtl for a successful nine appeal 
favorable at present, if a dependable 
staff of hurlers can be developed. At 
present "Norm" Nash, a senior, is the 
only twirler who has had varsity experi- 
ence. On the receiving end, Briggs and 
Lane, substitutes last year, are warming 
up the pitchers. , 

(Continued on Page 2) 



TRACK TEAM EXPECTS 
SUCCESSFUL SEASON 



Thirty-five Candidates for Varsity 
Twenty-five for Frosh Team 



There are prospects for a very success- 
ful spring track season this year, with 
thirty-five men for the varsity and 
twenty-five men for the freshman team 
re|»orting every day to Coach Derby. 
There is some very good material in the 
two groups which needs only to be 
trained to turn out some excellent per- 
formers. 

Last year's graduating class took with 
it five valuable men from the track team. 
The men lost were: Captain Loren 
Sniffen, New Kngland Intercollegiate 
broad jump champion and star in the 
dashes; Edward Tucker, high jumper 
and pole vaulter; < .era Id Thompson, 
hurdler and broad jumper; Lawrence 
Jones, javelin thrower; and Harold 
Thurlow, weight thrower. The loss of 
these men makes a big gap to be filled 
from the ranks of the newcomers. 

However, there are still several letter 
men left, Captain Fred Swan, half miler; 
Stanley Hall, quarter miler and broad 
jumper; Newell Schapelle, Eastern Inter- 
collegiate champion in the 880; and a 
half miler, Vincent Henneberry, winner 
of the Rolls Royce mile at the Springfield 
meet recently held; and Malcolm Dresser, 
discus thrower and shot putter. In 
addition there are two members of last 
year's cross country team who are 
looked upon to help out the team. These 
(Continued on Page i) 



Closing the basketball season with a 
fast tl to *J victory over Tufts on 
March 9, "Kid" (.ore's "Opportunists" 
terminated a successful schedule of 
thiitccii games, eight ,,f which were wins, 
a vary creditable record for a tpjintel 
which included three* new nun in its 
lineup during t he season. 

The outstanding accomplishments of 
the 1927 quintet wen- the conquering of 
Northeastern, W.P.I., Williams, and 
Vermont. Northeastern, rated a favorite, 
ie. , -ived a .'t.{ to 17 setback at the hands 
of the Agates in the Boston "V". Wor- 
cester Tech, winner of ten out of fourteen 
contests, was nosed out in an overtime 
game at M.A.C. Williams was also 
halted when its quintet was at the height 
of its |X)wer. The high-water mark of 
the year was the deieat administered to 
Vermont, 20 to 17, at Burlington, a 
trick turned by no other team this year. 
The Agates were undefeated on the 
Drill Hall floor, but lost to West Point, 
Maine, Wesleyan, New Hampshire and 
Middlcbury by small margins in all but 
the first case. Clark, B.U., Trinity, and 
Tufts fell before the Aggie onslaught. 

The "stalling" offensive of the Agates 
proved its worth as an effective type of 
play, for few of the op|M>rients could keep 
the Agates from scoring, and many more 
found it exceedingly difficult to penetrate 
the Aggie defense. This style of basketball 
> Continued on Page 4) 



Freshman Baseball 

Candidates Report 

Twenty-Three Try for Positions on 
Yearling Team 



Display Collection 

Of Colored Glass 



Unique Eihibit May Be Seen In 
Prof. Waugh 's Office 



An exhibition of uniquely co l ored glass 

Kin-, consisting largely of vases, jai 

l)owls, is Irf-ing held in Professor I rank 

A. Waugh's office in Wilder Hall. These 

lieaiitiful glass pieces were sent to M.A. 
('. for the porpOM "f exhibition by Art 
E. Etter, a former graduate student in 

Landscape Architecture, and repi 

the type of work Ix-ing done by the 
("olorcraft Artists in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Perfume buttles, powder taxes, cigar- 
ette jars, (lower jars and rose tawls. all 
in harmoniously blended colors, are on 
show in this exhibition. Among the 
various combinations of colors appearing 
on this glass ware, probably the most 
attractive are arrangements of orange 
with black, and black with soft blue. 
Numerous shades of individual colors are 
also shown, chief among which are blue, 
green, yellow, and pink. 



Freshman baseball candidates rrported 
to Phil Couhig on Monday, March 28, 
for their first practice. Twenty-three 
appeared with a few more expected to 
come out soon. Batting practice will be 
the work for awhile until the ground 
loses its sogginess and becomes available 
for fielding practice, which time is not far 
away. The battery candidates have been 
working out steadily since shortly before 
the end of the past term and bid fair to 
be in good condition when practice games 
start. 

Burgess, assistant manager of baseball, 
is working out a schedule to be announced 
soon, included in which will be games 
with the Amherst College freshmen, 
Williston, Turners falls High, Cathedral 
High of Springfield, and at least three 
others. The annual soph-frosh numeral 
game during Commencement week is to 
complete the eight game schedule. 



PROM COMMITTEE 

MAKES FINAL PUNS 



Tea Dance Is New Feature of 
Prom Season 



The I'rom ( 'ommitfee is going forth 
with its preparation with renewed vigor 
btcafJM of the large response which has 
COflSe from the menitar> of the upper 
I Isaacs during the past few days. All 
present indii ation* tend to show that the 
Miming 1838 Prom will l»e one of the 
most attractive evw held in Memorial 
Hall 

'I be Prom season will \»- brought to a 

fitting close by a novel tea dance. The 
inu-ic for thi> o cca si on will I*- lurnislicd 
by NeWCOOlb'l Radio Broadcasting Or- 
chestra of ten pitOtl. Thai i losing fea- 
ture h schedu l ed to Ik- held in the Memo- 
rial Building from 9 to p. in. A more 
definite annoum ement regarding further 
derails will be printed in the next issue. 
The patrons and patronesses for the 
I'rom Dance will !»• as follows: President 
and Mrs. Edward M. Lewis, Dean and 
Mrs. William L. Ma< Inner, and Professor 
and Mr-. Geoff)! W. Alderman. Those 
looking forward to attending I'rom should 
signify their intention to some member 
of the Prom Committee within the next 
two weeks. This is important in order 
to insure that all may have favors. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1927 



TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Puplished every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



EKNEST L. SPKNttk "-'H 

■UiwoviH Barnard '28 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Athletic* Harold E. Clark "2k 

(mari.es S. CUUVM '29 

John B. Howard Jr. "30 

Campu. New. Edward H. Nichols '29 

Carl A. Bergan '.'«) 

Eric Singleton '30 

faculty It Short Courtei CKMUN H. VftSMBS -'<) 

Alumni Josephine Paniica '28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Edwin A. Wilder '2K Business Manager 

Douglas A. Loring '28 Circulation Manager 

Harold K.